Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Dry Yeast vs. Liquid Yeast
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-21-2010, 12:32 AM   #1
Senneffe
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 10
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default Dry Yeast vs. Liquid Yeast

Is there much difference?

__________________
Senneffe is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-21-2010, 01:39 AM   #2
Schnitzengiggle
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 2,664
Liked 29 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 16

Default

When it comes to fermentation, they are both yeast, and will both consume sugars, however, dry yeasts aren't available in as many different strains as liquid cultures. You definitely cannot make a true Witbier, or Hefeweizen without the proper yeast. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think you can get those yeasts in a dry variety. There are many more choices with liquids, but liquids do require starters, and are more expensive.

There are many here that will argue about liquid vs dry, but I am from the philosophy of "what type of yeast do the breweries I like use?"

Anyhow, there are some great clean fermenting dry yeasts, but again, for certain styles liquid cultures are a must. Price will be one of the largest factors.

__________________
follow me @ Broken Glass Brewery

Okham's Razor - simplest explanation is usually the correct one.

My DIY Kegerator - My DIY Fermentation Chamber - My DIY Portable Pump Box
Schnitzengiggle is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-21-2010, 01:49 AM   #3
Senneffe
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 10
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I was looking at different extract kits and saw an additional fee for liquid yeast.

__________________
Senneffe is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-21-2010, 02:25 AM   #4
ajf
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ajf's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Long Island
Posts: 4,643
Liked 99 Times on 93 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

That's because liquid yeast costs more.
I almost always use liquid yeast, simply because the yeasts I like for most of my brews aren't available in the dry form.
However, if I make an APA, I will use S-05 because I can't taste the difference between that and the liquid equivalents, and it is easier and cheaper.

-a.

__________________

There are only 10 types of people in this world. Those that understand binary, and those that don't.

ajf is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-21-2010, 03:16 AM   #6
samc
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 5,420
Liked 55 Times on 52 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

If you are just starting out I recommend you use dry, unless you are making a style that does not fit with dry. I started with dry, move to liquid and now mostly use dry as it is more consistent and easier. For the beers I brew I can not detect any difference.

I did recently brew a Munich Helles and used dry, it was a beer I think would have done better with liquid yeast, live and learn.

__________________
samc is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-21-2010, 03:25 AM   #7
marubozo
I can has homebrew?
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
marubozo's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: SW Michigan
Posts: 30,659
Liked 5371 Times on 5229 Posts
Likes Given: 222

Default

If you're brewing a style that doesn't depend on the yeast lending a particular flavor it isn't going to matter much whether you use a fairly neutral dry or liquid yeast. But as others have mentioned, some styles call for specific strains of yeast that may only be available in liquid form.

I use both types just depending on the style. I'll stick to liquid when I'm doing a wheat, belgian, or british style ale so I can get a good yeast to match the style. But if I'm doing a typical pale ale, IPA, or something I usually just go with nottingham of S-05 or something that isn't going to lend much of a yeast character.

So, six of one or half a dozen of the other. Both will make great beer.

__________________
marubozo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-21-2010, 08:53 PM   #8
shanecb
Kvlt Brewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
shanecb's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,139
Liked 20 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schnitzengiggle View Post
You definitely cannot make a true Witbier, or Hefeweizen without the proper yeast. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think you can get those yeasts in a dry variety.
There actually is a dry form of hefeweizen, but the only brand I've seen is Safbrew (I think it's WB-06). But in general, yeah your choices with using a liquid yeast are way better.
__________________
A particular love for ancient, obsolete, or lesser-known style from both the US and abroad.

We are the Sons of Winter and Stars
We ́ve come from a far beyond time
Forever the fire burns in our hearts
Our world shall never die
- Wintersun
shanecb is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Liquid Yeast--Do Kits in Sequence or Split Yeast Pack? osagedr Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 02-27-2010 03:24 PM
Kit comes with liquid yeast, first time brewer I think I want dry. Which dry yeast? rival178 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 10-22-2009 03:10 AM
Pitch dry yeast or re-order the liquid yeast? damrass Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 08-04-2008 03:17 AM
Do commercial breweries use dry yeast or liquid yeast? fat x nub Commercial Brew Discussion 5 08-01-2008 03:52 PM
Liquid yeast longer to start than dry yeast? ndhowlett General Beer Discussion 2 01-07-2008 07:26 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS