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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Dry yeast aeration?
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Old 04-30-2008, 11:45 AM   #1
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Default Dry yeast aeration?

I'm planning on doing my first extract brew this weekend. I'm using an APA kit from the LHBS and it comes with Safale-US05. I've seen in passing somewhere that dry-yeast has been pre-aerated so the wort doesn't need aeration; is this true?

If not I may try the olive-oil-and-pin trick as sloshing a load of wort around seems like a recipe for trouble in a small kitchen

Thanks,
Steve

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Old 04-30-2008, 12:39 PM   #2
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I have never heard of pre-aerated yeast.

When using dry yeast re-hydrate, which means putting the yeast into some warm (90 degree F) water and letting it come back to life gradually for 30 minutes before pitching.

I aerate all my wort before pitching though. I think this step is required for good results.

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Old 04-30-2008, 12:44 PM   #3
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But aeration doesn't have to be a chore! You aerate when your pour the cooled wort from the brewpot into the fermenter. You aerate when you stir it with a sanitized spoon. It really doesn't take much for an extract brewer to aerate. If you're adding water to a wort (like if you boil 2 or 3 gallons, and then add water to bring you to 5 gallons), you aerate when you pour in that additional water.

I wouldn't add olive oil or anything to it until you are doing full all grain brewing and find that you need to do that. I don't add any substance to my beer to aerate.

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Old 04-30-2008, 02:23 PM   #4
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An air pump would safe you a lot of work aerating your wort. I am thinking of getting one myself. Shaking 23 litres of wort like crazy is very hard work.

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Old 04-30-2008, 03:05 PM   #5
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Yooper's right, aeration isn't a chore....After you pour and slosh your boiled wort into your top off water you're almost done aerating...Now you have to thoroughly mix the wort with the top off water, so you can get an accurate hydro reading anyway. I use long handled slotted stirrer from my LHBS;



I "whip" my beer for about 5 minutes, then take my gravity reading and pitch my yeast.

Viola...It's aerated!

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Old 04-30-2008, 06:36 PM   #6
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I think you are confusing aeration with a starter. Dry yeast shouldn't be used to make a starter as it has been grown under ideal conditions to maximize energy stores and lipid stores so it is ready to go. You still need aerated wort for it to be pitched into so it can reproduce a few generations before switching over to fermentation.

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Old 05-01-2008, 12:17 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Got Trub?
I think you are confusing aeration with a starter. Dry yeast shouldn't be used to make a starter as it has been grown under ideal conditions to maximize energy stores and lipid stores so it is ready to go. You still need aerated wort for it to be pitched into so it can reproduce a few generations before switching over to fermentation.

GT
I think where I've got the wrong end of the stick is the lipid issue. My understanding is that aerating the wort is necessary as the yeast need the oxygen to generate lipids for budding during the initial growth phase. If, as you say, the dried yeast already has lipids supplied during preparation then the oxygen shouldn't be necessary? This is where the olive-oil comes in, it can supply the lipids so aeration can be skipped, which is desirable for long-term stability. More info here if you haven't already seen it.

Thanks,
Steve
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Old 05-01-2008, 12:18 AM   #8
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Old 05-01-2008, 12:22 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s3n8
When using dry yeast re-hydrate, which means putting the yeast into some warm (90 degree F) water and letting it come back to life gradually for 30 minutes before pitching.
This bit confuses me. I see this a lot, including in John Palmer's book, but the yeast instructions say to pitch directly into the wort?
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Old 05-01-2008, 12:24 AM   #10
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Well, yes, the yeast need lipids, but that is sort of a separate issue from the O2 angle. I know that there is discussion of using olive oil in lieu of aeration in big breweries. Still, the way the yeast (dry yeast that is) is produced, adding a little o2 for homebrewers is the preferred method. Here's some reading on it:
http://www.danstaryeast.com/library/...n_vs_wort.html

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