Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > dry hops to a stout?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-23-2014, 10:57 AM   #1
Jimbob3000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 39
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default dry hops to a stout?

I've just brewed a fairly simple stout and I'm thinking of adding dry hops at the secondary.
This is the recipe I followed:

Pale malt 3120g
Torrefied wheat 905g
Chocolate malk 300g

Start of boil 18g Challenger

As I said, I am thinking of adding dry hops at the secondary because with just 18g challenger at the start of boil, there doesn't seem to be much to it.

The hops I have available are Fuggles, Target, Challenger, Cascade, Styrians. If any of them, I'd probably go for about 15 or 20g of either Cascade or Styrians.

Any thoughts on this?

__________________
Jimbob3000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2014, 11:34 AM   #2
Gameface
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Gameface's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 1,218
Liked 229 Times on 146 Posts
Likes Given: 309

Default

Not trying to be a smart ass but that's a stout? More wheat than chocolate malt and zero roasted barley.

I say go for the dry hop. Styrians, but just shooting from the hip on that one.

Sent from my SPH-M840 using Home Brew mobile app

__________________
Gameface is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2014, 11:42 AM   #3
Jimbob3000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 39
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Yeah...looks a bit rubbish to me too! It was basically leftovers and following Graham Wheeler's Burton Bridge Top Dog Stout.

20g Styrians you reckon?

__________________
Jimbob3000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2014, 01:54 PM   #4
Gameface
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Gameface's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 1,218
Liked 229 Times on 146 Posts
Likes Given: 309

Default

I'd do 20g cascade and 20g Styrian

__________________
Gameface is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2014, 02:04 PM   #5
DocScott
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Rockland County, NY
Posts: 800
Liked 108 Times on 84 Posts

Default

I think you'll end up too light and not the correct flavors for a stout. You definitely won't get the nice roasted flavors needed for a stout from the grain bill you listed. You may get somewhere in a brown though.

With that said, just don't call it a stout! In terms of dry hopping it, it depends on what you want from it. If it was a stout, I would say do not dry hop it (as if you're trying to brew to style, a strong hop aroma would be out of place). Since it is not a stout, you can choose where you go with it - if you want more of an american brown (the wheat is kinda outta place) but you could use some of your cascade. If you want more english brown, I again, wouldn't dry hop.

This recipe doesn't really fit into any style per se, and it doesn't have to be "to style". If it were me, I'd let it ride without dry hopping and see how it turns out. I'm in the mindset of less is more usually.

__________________
DocScott is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2014, 06:31 PM   #6
Queequeg
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 560
Liked 45 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 49

Default

If you dry hop, I would rack to secondary after 3 weeks in primary, then give is another 3 or 4 weeks to mature before dry hoping. Being a darker beer (looks like a brown ale to me) it will need longer to mature out the green flavours and hashness. If you dry hop and then age in the bottle the hop aroma will largely be diminished (which is why dark beers aren't classically dry hopped). By maturing off the yeast cake first and then in the last week dry hopping you'll have a better beer after carbing is complete in the bottle.

I have never tried this myself but it is something I won't to get around to, probably with an imperial stout. I'll rack it after 3-4 weeks to be glass carboy, cover it and leave it in the larder for as long as I can. Then I'll dry hop a week before bottling and repitch a small amount of yeast.

btw dry hopping is out of style for a English stout or brown ale. Typically English dark ales just have bittering additions and the flavour aspect should carry over from this. Hop Aroma is out of style. That said I love hoppy dark ales.

__________________
Queequeg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2014, 07:28 PM   #7
Jimbob3000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 39
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Ok. So it seems as though i haven't actually got a stout on my hands at all, ha. By the sounds of things it isn't going to do any harm, so long as i add them at the right time, and it may well end up a decent hoppy dark ale. As it stands, the ingredients aren't hugely inspiring so i think i may as well add them.

__________________
Jimbob3000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2014, 07:35 PM   #8
Jimbob3000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 39
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Just to check... you think 3 weeks primary, shift to secondary and leave for 3 weeks, add hops and leave one week, prime and bottle.

__________________
Jimbob3000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2014, 09:42 PM   #9
Queequeg
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 560
Liked 45 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 49

Default

Yep that's how I would do it. That way you can mature the beer without losing the benefits of dry hopping. Report back with the result, I am very interested to see how it turns out for you.

At 7 weeks you shouldn't need to repitch the yeast, but you can always add a little dry yeast to the priming bucket, it can't hurt. It wouldn't even have to be the same yeast as used in the fermentation. A fast flocking strain like US-04 would be good.

__________________
Queequeg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2014, 09:46 PM   #10
Walzenbrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Nashville/Clarksville, TN
Posts: 85
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

There's a reason you don't see a lot of hoppy stouts.

Not saying don't go for it- but either it'll be awful or you have a cult classic on your hands

Good luck


Guides, Walkthroughs and Tips for New Homebrewers:

Http://thebeginnersbrew.com/


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew

__________________

Beginner Brewing Tutorials:
http://thebeginnersbrew.com

Walzenbrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stout n Hops HopSong Recipes/Ingredients 1 12-20-2013 05:37 PM
Too much hops in stout Straight6TT Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 01-04-2013 01:00 AM
Hops for stout DanVSTL Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 07-29-2010 06:03 AM
Hops for a Dry Stout Prionburger Recipes/Ingredients 6 10-21-2009 09:05 AM
Hops for a stout Ó Flannagáin Recipes/Ingredients 16 03-20-2007 08:24 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS