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Old 11-14-2012, 06:00 PM   #31
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I don't do this anymore, but...

I went through a lazy phase once. I keg-hopped a batch with an ounce of cascade (whole) in the serving keg (5g). When the keg was kicked, I racked the next batch on top of that, without cleaning it or removing the hops. To top it off, I did it one more time later (3 times total). FYI, the hops were in a hop bag-like bag, tied to the top portion of the dip tube with an extension to ensure that it hung low enough to be in the beer but not interfere with the dip tube.

Never noticed anything grassy or off, although I'm sure I ran the risk of many different things happening there.
Supremely lazy, I love it.
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Old 11-15-2012, 05:04 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by WhoZiT View Post
I don't do this anymore, but...

I went through a lazy phase once. I keg-hopped a batch with an ounce of cascade (whole) in the serving keg (5g). When the keg was kicked, I racked the next batch on top of that, without cleaning it or removing the hops. To top it off, I did it one more time later (3 times total). FYI, the hops were in a hop bag-like bag, tied to the top portion of the dip tube with an extension to ensure that it hung low enough to be in the beer but not interfere with the dip tube.

Never noticed anything grassy or off, although I'm sure I ran the risk of many different things happening there.
On another note, my kegs aren't chilled. I don't have a kegerator/keezer. Instead, I use a refrigerated jockey box-like server, so my kegs are at room temp. They're cold in the winter, though.
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Old 11-15-2012, 12:55 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoZiT View Post
I keg-hopped a batch with an ounce of cascade (whole) in the serving keg (5g). When the keg was kicked, I racked the next batch on top of that, without cleaning it or removing the hops. To top it off, I did it one more time later (3 times total).

Never noticed anything grassy or off, although I'm sure I ran the risk of many different things happening there.
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On another note, my kegs aren't chilled. I don't have a kegerator/keezer. Instead, I use a refrigerated jockey box-like server, so my kegs are at room temp.
This is interesting. So how long would you say the hops were in the keg at room temps?
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Old 11-15-2012, 10:23 PM   #34
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This is interesting. So how long would you say the hops were in the keg at room temps?
I'd say a keg lasts 7-10 days around here, depending on whether or not I have the second faucet hooked up and whether or not my BIL is in town. So, 20-30 days?

It was also late spring, so ambient temp was maybe 20 c.
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Old 11-16-2012, 03:31 AM   #35
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I was rereading How to Brew and came across this:

"Grassy
Flavors reminiscent of chlorophyll and fresh cut grass occasionally occur and are most often linked to poorly stored ingredients. Poorly stored malt can pick up moisture and develop musty smells. Aldehydes can form in old malt and can contribute green grass flavors. Hops are another source of these green flavors. If the hops are poorly stored or not properly dried prior to storage, the chlorophyll compounds will become evident in the beer."

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Old 11-16-2012, 09:57 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by phatspade
I was rereading How to Brew and came across this:

"Grassy
Flavors reminiscent of chlorophyll and fresh cut grass occasionally occur and are most often linked to poorly stored ingredients. Poorly stored malt can pick up moisture and develop musty smells. Aldehydes can form in old malt and can contribute green grass flavors. Hops are another source of these green flavors. If the hops are poorly stored or not properly dried prior to storage, the chlorophyll compounds will become evident in the beer."
Since oxygen is a major component of this, I'm guessing that keg hopping with properly stored hops is a good combo. I'm also guessing here, but dry hopping in the primary or secondary fermenter-some of the desired aroma may be lost through the airlock and the undesirable aromas may be more prominent. In the keg-no oxygen and the desirable aromas are retained, so the undesirables may not be as noticeable.
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Old 11-29-2012, 07:05 PM   #37
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A bit late to the party on this one, but I'm trying to see if I can fix a batch that I dry hopped for too long with fresh wet hops.

I "dry" hopped with freshly picked whole cones out of the backyard, a blend of cascade, centennial, and columbus. The hops sat on the beer for 14 days - I've dry hopped around that long with no ill effects before, so I didn't taste it until the 14 days was up.

At that point, I discovered a strong vegetal, almost asparagus like aroma, and a hint of it in the taste.

It's been about a month sitting in the keg, and it's not going away. Trying to decide if I may have ruined this batch.

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Old 12-05-2012, 09:33 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoZiT View Post
Since oxygen is a major component of this, I'm guessing that keg hopping with properly stored hops is a good combo. I'm also guessing here, but dry hopping in the primary or secondary fermenter-some of the desired aroma may be lost through the airlock and the undesirable aromas may be more prominent. In the keg-no oxygen and the desirable aromas are retained, so the undesirables may not be as noticeable.

Sorry for not replying in a timely fashion as I didn't stay subscribed to it. You could say that, but there's more than one way for the grassy/veggie taste to happen. I reread How to Brew again and just came across more info. This is a direct word-for-word quote in the book from Chapter 1, Section 5.1, under the paragraph about "Finishing" hops.

"A word of caution when adding hops at knockout or using a hopback - depending on several factors, e.g. amount, variety, freshness, etc., the beer may take on a grassy taste due to tannins and other compounds which are usually neutralized by the boil. If short boil times are not yielding the desired hop aroma or a grassy flavor is evident, then I would suggest using FWH(first wort hopping) or Dry Hopping."
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