Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Dry Enzyme resulted in 1.002 FG
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-09-2013, 03:04 AM   #11
JLem
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,641
Liked 168 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bleme View Post
Even if you have 100% fermentable wort, shouldn't the yeasts attenuation have kick in a few points back?
No, not really...the attenuation listed for a particular yeast strain is for a "normal" beer wort, which will have a variety of sugars - some which can and some which cannot be fermented/metabolized by the yeast. In this instance, the wort was not "normal" and all the sugars that could not have been metabolized/fermented were converted into ones that could.

As long as the yeast is capable of fermenting a particular sugar (and conditions are still conducive to yeast health) then the yeast will keep on fermenting. This is why if you use an ale yeast to make hard cider it can take it down to a specific gravity below 1.000 - the sugars found in apple juice are completely fermentable by the yeast, so it doesn't matter if the yeast's normal attenuation is only, say, 70%.
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-09-2013, 05:49 AM   #12
rayfound
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Riverside, CA
Posts: 179
Liked 30 Times on 21 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JLem View Post
This is why if you use an ale yeast to make hard cider it can take it down to a specific gravity below 1.000 - the sugars found in apple juice are completely fermentable by the yeast, so it doesn't matter if the yeast's normal attenuation is only, say, 70%.
Ask me how I know!

I was given a Mr Beer kit, and while I had no intention of using the kit that came with it, I took the yeast and added apple juice + sugar (to 1.070) into the little mr Beer keg. It will apparently not stop.

My cider started at 1070... I figured it was done at 1012. Then I knew it was done at 1001, now I'm not sure what to think at 0997.

It is dry but pretty tasty though.
__________________
rayfound is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-10-2013, 06:45 AM   #13
HopZombie99
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Auckland, NZ
Posts: 101
Liked 16 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 60

Default

I measured it again today and its 1.000 now. hahahahaha! Still tastes ok tho. Bitter, but not unpleasant. Hopefully once I get it carbed up it'll be fine. The worst case scenario is that it is a lesson learned.

From the sample I took to measure the gravity, it will still be a nice beer. Nice dry beer....

__________________
HopZombie99 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-10-2013, 10:00 AM   #14
jakeperks
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Telford, Shropshire
Posts: 69
Liked 11 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HopZombie99
...it will still be a nice beer. Nice dry beer....
And at around 8.3% you won't really care after a pint or three :-)
__________________
jakeperks is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-10-2013, 11:34 AM   #15
JLem
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,641
Liked 168 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HopZombie99
I measured it again today and its 1.000 now. hahahahaha! Still tastes ok tho. Bitter, but not unpleasant. Hopefully once I get it carbed up it'll be fine. The worst case scenario is that it is a lesson learned.

From the sample I took to measure the gravity, it will still be a nice beer. Nice dry beer....
It is possible for the gravity to drop below 1.000, so it might not be done. Make sure you have stable readings before bottling.
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-10-2013, 09:54 PM   #16
HopZombie99
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Auckland, NZ
Posts: 101
Liked 16 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 60

Default

Yes, I measured it at 1.002 a few days ago and it was 1.000 yesterday, so ill be sure to wait for it to finish before packaging.

Dry enzyme is crazy stuff man. At least as an experiment I know what it does to the beer.

I'm hoping for a good beer still. More potent than I was expecting but good.

__________________
HopZombie99 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2013, 12:36 PM   #17
DrunkleJon
I'm good enough. I'm smart enough. And doggone it, people like me.
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
DrunkleJon's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Alexandria, Virginia
Posts: 4,409
Liked 1065 Times on 795 Posts
Likes Given: 523

Default

Now that is a dry beer. Worst case scenario it could be used as an gasoline additive in a pinch.

*Your drunkle does not advocate using homebrew in your car's gas tank.

__________________
DrunkleJon is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2013, 03:24 PM   #18
gingerdawg
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 389
Liked 33 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Is there a limit to how much the enzymes will convert?
If he added more un-fermentable sugars, would the enzymes enventually poop out? or will they continue to convert to fermentable sugars?

__________________
gingerdawg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2013, 03:49 PM   #19
JLem
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,641
Liked 168 Times on 148 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gingerdawg View Post
Is there a limit to how much the enzymes will convert?
If he added more un-fermentable sugars, would the enzymes enventually poop out? or will they continue to convert to fermentable sugars?
Generally, enzymes will function as long as conditions are right. They don't get used up in the process, though they may degrade over time. However, if temp or pH changes drastically, the enzymes will denature, which will render them useless. I have no idea what the optimal conditions are for the dry enzyme the OP used, so it is possible that the beer environment may not be ideal and so the enzyme is slowly degrading. Not sure if there is any way to tell though without adding maltodextrin and see.
__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2013, 11:52 AM   #20
HopZombie99
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Auckland, NZ
Posts: 101
Liked 16 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 60

Default

As a follow up, the beer that was the reason for the OP turned out fine. It was stronger than I intended and it definitely lacked a bit of body, but the beer was mos def drinkable. As an experiment, the dry enzyme gave me a good 2% abv over and above what I thought I would get. The end result was a thin but drinkable beer.

Thanks to all for the advice given.

CHEERS!

__________________
HopZombie99 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
To enzyme or not to enzyme? Pectin CodyA Cider Forum 23 11-05-2013 12:48 PM
Decoction resulted in astringent beer. Is low gravity to blame here? Input please. bigbeergeek All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 6 07-31-2012 05:53 AM
Technique or practice that resulted in biggest taste difference mklojay General Beer Discussion 46 05-08-2012 11:14 PM
Tea ball resulted in metallic flavor? bovineblitz General Techniques 4 05-28-2010 05:32 PM
Dry Enzyme The Apprentice General Techniques 0 08-22-2005 10:54 AM