Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Double IPA 5-6% ABV
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-06-2012, 05:22 AM   #21
grimstuff
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ukiah, CA
Posts: 252
Liked 18 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 49

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brettwasbtd View Post
Whats going on with the carapils and sucrose? They seem like they are used for the exact oppossite reasons: one for more body, the other for less... couldn't you decrease the carapils and not use the sucrose? Im confused at this combo
Here's how it makes sense to me:

CaraPils = body without flavor; contributes to mouthfeel, but not a lot to malt backbone. Head-retention characteristics of crystal.

Sugar = providing alcohol without contributing to backbone. Lighter body, but only because it provides alcohol. More of a gentle balancing act than adding X-amount of sugar to equal X-amount of lightness.

The two things they have in common are contributing to the character of the beer without adding maltiness. I think where it gets confusing is when we think of sucrose and dextrins as being on opposite ends of the same "body" spectrum. Body isn't always easily defineable, at least not to me. I'm not looking for any dominate malt notes with this recipe, so the dextrin malt is great for making a lighter-bodied, but not thin, beer. In its absence you'd use either more 2-row or crystal (more or different flavor) or more sugar (more alcohol, possibly sweetness). And I'm not looking for either a lot of malt flavor (definitely not cloying crystal) or much sweetness or booze.

Vinnie lists Carapils second when relating the simplicity of a DIPA grain bill, and it's used in the actual Pliny recipe, along with sugar. Of course, the proportion of Carapils in this recipe is much higher (11.7%) than it is in the 5-gallon Pliny recipe (4%). So as to the final effect, I'll have to wait and see.
__________________
grimstuff is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 12:24 AM   #22
brettwasbtd
Awesomeness Award Winnner
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
brettwasbtd's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Damascus, MD
Posts: 1,411
Liked 43 Times on 38 Posts
Likes Given: 78

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by grimstuff View Post
Here's how it makes sense to me:

CaraPils = body without flavor; contributes to mouthfeel, but not a lot to malt backbone. Head-retention characteristics of crystal.

Sugar = providing alcohol without contributing to backbone. Lighter body, but only because it provides alcohol. More of a gentle balancing act than adding X-amount of sugar to equal X-amount of lightness.

The two things they have in common are contributing to the character of the beer without adding maltiness. I think where it gets confusing is when we think of sucrose and dextrins as being on opposite ends of the same "body" spectrum. Body isn't always easily defineable, at least not to me. I'm not looking for any dominate malt notes with this recipe, so the dextrin malt is great for making a lighter-bodied, but not thin, beer. In its absence you'd use either more 2-row or crystal (more or different flavor) or more sugar (more alcohol, possibly sweetness). And I'm not looking for either a lot of malt flavor (definitely not cloying crystal) or much sweetness or booze.

Vinnie lists Carapils second when relating the simplicity of a DIPA grain bill, and it's used in the actual Pliny recipe, along with sugar. Of course, the proportion of Carapils in this recipe is much higher (11.7%) than it is in the 5-gallon Pliny recipe (4%). So as to the final effect, I'll have to wait and see.
I guess I can see where you are coming from. Still not the approach I would use. A low ABV beer like this I would probably be trying to keep the alcohol lower, so the sucrose wouldn't even been on my mind. Also my attempts at something like this are closer to the 4% range so it might be why I wouldnt include the sucrose
__________________
Shegogue Brew | Pronounced "Shuh·goo" | http://shegoguebrew.blogspot.com | BJCP Certified Judge B0999
brettwasbtd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 12:47 AM   #23
BreezyBrew
Fully Fermented.
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BreezyBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: New Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,887
Liked 228 Times on 176 Posts
Likes Given: 66

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brettwasbtd

I guess I can see where you are coming from. Still not the approach I would use. A low ABV beer like this I would probably be trying to keep the alcohol lower, so the sucrose wouldn't even been on my mind. Also my attempts at something like this are closer to the 4% range so it might be why I wouldnt include the sucrose
Maybe I'm just ignorant but I wouldn't think a 4% beer would have any body at all.
__________________

- 99% Perspiration 1% Beer
- "Take your own experience as the gospel" -Denny

BreezyBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 01:13 AM   #24
ShinyBuddha
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 347
Liked 17 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyBrew

Maybe I'm just ignorant but I wouldn't think a 4% beer would have any body at all.
A few styles have 4-5% with nice body. Weizen comes to mind first....but then this thread is looking for a 5-6% IIPA, not 4%.
__________________
ShinyBuddha is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 01:18 AM   #25
brettwasbtd
Awesomeness Award Winnner
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
brettwasbtd's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Damascus, MD
Posts: 1,411
Liked 43 Times on 38 Posts
Likes Given: 78

Default

Wheats, some milds, scottish ales. With the right grain bill/yeast attenuation you can make a full flavored beer as low as 3-4%. "Body" in a beer is a delicate dance between residual sweetness and dextrins, carbonation level and IBUs in my mind. General I only think to use sucrose if I wanted to a dry a beer out OR if I making a higher ABV beer and I dont want it to have too much body. Anything under 5% and im not too worried about it having too much body, hence no sucrose

__________________
Shegogue Brew | Pronounced "Shuh·goo" | http://shegoguebrew.blogspot.com | BJCP Certified Judge B0999
brettwasbtd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 05:20 AM   #26
buttcord
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Posts: 62
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyBrew View Post
Can anyone tell me why this isn't a real thing? Personally, I'd love to drink a super hoppy 5.5% beer.
Are you kidding? Its called a frickin pale ale.
__________________
buttcord is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 07:55 AM   #27
MTate37
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 750
Liked 104 Times on 59 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Ughhh...I could use an extract low ABV IPA recipe. Too drunk right now.

__________________

Untappd: mtate37 - Untappd Wishlist

MTate37 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 09:57 AM   #28
ShinyBuddha
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 347
Liked 17 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by buttcord
Are you kidding? Its called a frickin pale ale.
It's not.........
__________________
ShinyBuddha is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 11:22 AM   #29
Paramecium
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Paramecium's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Long Beach, Ca.
Posts: 250
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShinyBuddha View Post
It's not.........
In my mind it would just be an IPA. A double tends to be in the 8% and up range.
__________________

Primary~ Empty

Secondary~ Mosaic IPA

Kegged~

Ransack Port Oak Aged RIS

Blood Orange Hefe

Bonne Nuit Saison

Paramecium is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2012, 01:21 PM   #30
BreezyBrew
Fully Fermented.
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BreezyBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: New Tampa, FL
Posts: 1,887
Liked 228 Times on 176 Posts
Likes Given: 66

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by buttcord View Post
Are you kidding? Its called a frickin pale ale.
I meant more in mouthfeel and hoppiness rather than abv.
__________________

- 99% Perspiration 1% Beer
- "Take your own experience as the gospel" -Denny

BreezyBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Double the ingredients, double the time? Ogie Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 06-16-2010 08:00 PM
Brewing a Double IPA - Double the yeast? airmike Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 03-24-2010 04:27 PM
Double I.P.A. double ingredient bill? nasmeyer Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 05-02-2009 01:24 PM
Double Batch Size = Double Ingredients? schneemann Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 10-27-2008 03:30 PM
Double the Recipe Double the Fun BearsWickedBrew Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 09-05-2008 04:57 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS