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signpost 07-22-2012 02:42 AM

don't want to waste left over grains
 
So here's the challenge:

I have a half pound of Belgian Special B already crushed.

I have a brew sitting on a Wyeast 3522 Belgian Ardennes yeast cake that I am going to transfer to secondary for some bulk aging.

I don't have a ton of cash to do a big expensive batch.

What relatively simple (extract/steeping grains, maybe partial mash or small BIAB) recipe can I do that would make use of both of those without leaving me with other left-over grains.

A simple kit (thinking NB or MW) that I could add my Special B to would be good. Or some other simple recipe that my LHBS would likely have the ingredients for would be 2nd choice. For what it's worth, my LHBS has a decent selection of supplies, based on my limited exploring of their inventory. The reason I have the left-over grain to begin with is that I ordered it from NB and 1 lbs is the smallest increment they sell bulk grains.

I've never pitched a new batch on an old yeast cake, but I like the cost-effectiveness and time-efficiency (no time spent on a starter) of that idea. And I really don't want the Special B sitting around until it gets stale and/or forgotten and not used. Any help or suggestions would be great. I've done about a half dozen batches and have been happy with the results so far, so I'm feeling comfortable with the idea of altering pre-determined recipes with a little extra grain.

Maybe a Pale Ale with some belgian flavors? A basic dubbel? A slightly brown farmhouse ale? What would you do in this situation?

a6ladd 07-22-2012 05:35 AM

A nice Belgian Dubbel wouldnt be a bad idea. Maybe something like this:

6# Pilsen DME
.5# Special B
1oz Saaz 60min
.5oz East Kent Goldings 5min

Pitch onto your yeast cake, wait patiently, and enjoy :mug:

Cheers!

dogbar 07-22-2012 06:00 AM

Since the sunk cost on that half pound of special B is less than a buck, I really wouldn't let that factor into my decision on what to brew next.

mease19 07-22-2012 05:17 PM

This is one reason I kind of like kits - proven recipe and no materials overages.

Calder 07-22-2012 06:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by a6ladd (Post 4270043)
A nice Belgian Dubbel wouldnt be a bad idea. Maybe something like this:

6# Pilsen DME
.5# Special B
1oz Saaz 60min
.5oz East Kent Goldings 5min

Pitch onto your yeast cake, wait patiently, and enjoy

That!

I'd recommend only using a quarter of the cake, rather than the whole.

Replace a pound of the DME for plain table sugar. This will help dry the beer out.

If you can't get Pilsen, you can use light, extra light, or similar.

Use either DME or LME. 6 lbs of DME = 7.5 lbs LME. Don't worry about getting the amounts of extract exact.

signpost 07-22-2012 11:28 PM

Looks like we have a winner.

How would you recommend I go about using only a quarter of the yeast cake? Pour the wort into a different fermenter and scoop/pour out just part of the yeast cake? Or scoop out the excess and then pour the wort directly into that fermenter.

Also, I'm not that familiar with the difference between East Kent Goldings and Styrian Goldings, but I know I've used the East Kent in an english beer and I've read a lot of recipes for belgian beers that use Styrians. Are they relatively similar?

Calder 07-22-2012 11:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by signpost (Post 4271422)
How would you recommend I go about using only a quarter of the yeast cake? Pour the wort into a different fermenter and scoop/pour out just part of the yeast cake? Or scoop out the excess and then pour the wort directly into that fermenter.

Also, I'm not that familiar with the difference between East Kent Goldings and Styrian Goldings, but I know I've used the East Kent in an english beer and I've read a lot of recipes for belgian beers that use Styrians. Are they relatively similar?

After racking/bottling the beer, swirl everything in the bottom of the fermenter (it should become a slurry), and pour about a pint into a sanitized container. Most people use mason jars. That should be sufficient for your next beer.

SKG and SG are similar. In a Belgian, the hops are just part of the supporting act, while the yeast is the star, so you don't use too many hops. Any English type hops will do fine (Fuggles, Willamette, Goldings, etc)

Stauffbier 07-23-2012 12:13 AM

With half a pound of Special B, I'd just steep it in 2 -3 cups of warm water, strain it, put 1/4 cup of your yeast slurry in it to make a starter. After the starter takes off dump it in a mixing bowl with some flour, olive oil, pinch of salt, and the spent grains. Mix it up, let it rise, and bake a couple pizza's! Then go order ingredients for a new batch of beer while washing the rest of the yeast cake! :mug:

signpost 07-23-2012 01:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stauffbier (Post 4271526)
With half a pound of Special B, I'd just steep it in 2 -3 cups of warm water, strain it, put 1/4 cup of your yeast slurry in it to make a starter. After the starter takes off dump it in a mixing bowl with some flour, olive oil, pinch of salt, and the spent grains. Mix it up, let it rise, and bake a couple pizza's! Then go order ingredients for a new batch of beer while washing the rest of the yeast cake! :mug:

Hhhhmmm....

signpost 07-26-2012 03:49 PM

I think I need to brew soon. The longer I wait, the more I think about adding to the recipe. This is where I'm at so far:

6 lbs. Briess Pilsen Light DME
1 lbs. Belgian Soft Candi Sugar - Brown
8 oz. Belgian Special B
8 oz. Table Sugar (Sucrose)

1 oz. Sterling - 60 min.
1 oz. Liberty - 10 min.
0.5 oz. Styrian Goldings - 5 min.
0.5 oz. Styrian Goldings - 1 min.

I included Sterling and Styrian Goldings, because I'm more familiar with them and enjoy them.

So, I wanted to brew with that half pound of Special B, because I didn't want it to go to waste even though it wasn't expensive. I wanted to use the 3522 yeast cake, because it would save time and money. I realized another part of my motivation for using both of those. It has forced me to break away from just looking at pre-set kits. Even though I'm sure I'll buy recipe kits in the future, coming up with something that uses what I already have is more creative and fun for me. Might not be more fun for everybody, but I enjoy it.

Oh yeah, I read a recipe for a dubbel in Brew Like A Monk that included raisins. Hhhhmmm....


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