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-   -   Does it take longer to carbonate 22oz bottles VS 12oz bottles? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/does-take-longer-carbonate-22oz-bottles-vs-12oz-bottles-233105/)

biggerthanyou83 03-17-2011 10:10 PM

Does it take longer to carbonate 22oz bottles VS 12oz bottles?
 
Ok on know that on this forum everyone recommends 3 weeks for letting your bottles carbonate. However, I bottled 22 oz beers not 12oz beers. And I was wondering if you place your bottles in the fridge after the time it spent carbonating wouldn’t the beer turnout flatter because of the temperature of the gas before it went in the fridge compared to what your pouring it at?

Thanx for any help:mug:

Hammy71 03-17-2011 10:12 PM

22 oz bottles often take longer to carb. 3 weeks is the minimum with some beers taking longer than a month. After 3 weeks, put one beer in the fridge and try it.

Golddiggie 03-17-2011 10:16 PM

Haven't seen any difference between 500ml and 1L bottles so far... I have a few 750ml Belgian bottles chilling down now, that I'll be opening up before the weekend is over...

If anything, I would give them a day or two longer in the fridge for the CO2 to go into the brew. Plus, it will help the trub to compact tighter and the brew to clear up better.

I bottle condition as close to 70F as I can.... Right now, the room is in the 70-74F range (cooler where the brew is sitting)... I typically will sample just one after at least two weeks carbonating. I let them go a full three weeks before chilling one down for 4-6 days and trying it. I've been using all Grolsch and Belgian bottles, without any 12oz or 22oz that use caps. I will say that you should have the proper head-space under the cap/cork... That could make the brew not carbonate properly...

Of course, there are plenty of people who have posted about giving higher ABV brews more time to carbonate... So without knowing what you've bottled, it's rather difficult to say... It would also be nice to know how much priming sugar you used, and what temp the brew fermented at, or at least it's temp when you bottled it up...

joelshults 03-18-2011 03:14 PM

I always bottle my batches into 2 cases of 22oz bombers and then end up with a little left over that goes into a couple of 12oz bottles. In my experience, the 22oz bottles usually take longer to carb. Sometimes 1 to 2 weeks longer (4 to 5 weeks total bottle conditioning time).

Slightly off topic, but I've also found that since I've been doing long primaries (4 to 5 weeks), my beers take longer to carb than the first couple of batches I bottled after around 2 weeks. I assume it is due to less yeast in suspension. But all of this waiting, (even the extra carb time) makes the beers much tastier in the end. Patience is tough, but definitely worth it.

Revvy 03-18-2011 03:21 PM

A larger volume sized bottle usually needs more time to carb AND condition. I have some pints, 22 oz bombers and other sizes that I often use, but since I enter contests I usually also do a sixer or two of standard 12 ouncers for entering. And inevitably the 12 ouncers are done at least a week faster than the larger bottles....some times two weeks ahead of time...

Also the rule of thumb is 3 weeks at 70 degrees for a normal grav 12 ounce bottle....to carb and condition....It takes longer for the yeasties to convert the larger volume in the bigger bottles to enough co2 in the headspace to be reabsorbed back into the solution...A ration I don't know how much...

Big Kahuna gives a good explanation here...
Quote:

Originally Posted by BigKahuna (Post 823182)
Simple. It's the ration of contact area just like in a keg. The c02 will need to pressurize the head space (Which takes LESS TIME) in a bigger bottle (More Yeast and sugar, roughly the same head space) but then it has to force that c02 into solution through the same contact area...thus it takes longer.

The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

unionrdr 03-18-2011 03:33 PM

My 1st batch (avatar pic) was in primary only 12 days before bottling in the 740ml PET bottles from my Cooper's micro brew kit. This batch will be in primary for 4 weeks (4th week dry hop). It'll be bottled Sunday,but It looks like I better let those 11.2-12oz bottles sit for 4,maybe 5 weeks to carb up. It took 3 weeks to go down to FG,even with the starter I made.
But the flavor should outta this world! So,the longer in primary,the bigger the bottle,the more time to carb.

wedge421 03-18-2011 03:40 PM

It shouldnt really take any longer in theory. I mean a 12 oz bottle is going to have the exact same percentage of priming sugar as in a 22oz bottle. It may be a different weight amount but it is all relative.

unionrdr 03-18-2011 03:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wedge421 (Post 2749253)
It shouldnt really take any longer in theory. I mean a 12 oz bottle is going to have the exact same percentage of priming sugar as in a 22oz bottle. It may be a different weight amount but it is all relative.

If you're priming in a bottling bucket or the like,yes,I concur. But with the sucrose pills in the bottle,it seems like it's a little different.?...

Revvy 03-18-2011 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unionrdr (Post 2749269)
If you're priming in a bottling bucket or the like,yes,I concur. But with the sucrose pills in the bottle,it seems like it's a little different.?...

It doesn't matter whether it's bulk primed or not...Theories are great, but like I said, I do it all the time, and it always takes the larger bottles longer than the 12 ouncers. Like I said kahuna explains it, and there's hundreds of threads where people are having that experience, of the larger taking longer and asking then asking about it.....

AnOldUR 03-18-2011 05:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Revvy (Post 2749560)
Theories are great....

Well here's one to support the 22oz taking longer.

When trying to convince people to not carbonate in growlers, you have talked about the CO2 pressure building up in the headspace and then being absorbed into the liquid. There's the same amount of surface area and volume in the neck of a 22 or 12 ounce bottle. Wouldn't the greater ratio beer to surface area make the CO2 absorb slower in the larger bottle?


edit:
Should of read the whole thread first.
Now I see your BigKahuna quote.:o


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