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Old 01-19-2012, 11:12 PM   #1
rhythmiccycle
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Default does more yeast cause alcohol to form faster ?

I know more sugar causes more abv, and more yeast does not. But does more yeast affect the rate of alcohol production?

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Old 01-20-2012, 12:22 AM   #2
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Sort of, a large growth phase form a low pitch rate will consume more energy so less alcohol can be made.

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Old 01-20-2012, 01:56 AM   #3
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Thanks for the reply. 2 follow up questions. (1) does liquid yeast have a higher alcohol potential then dry? (2) are the re any negative side effects by adding more yeast?

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Old 01-20-2012, 01:58 AM   #4
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Dry vs. liquid has no bearing on alcohol tolerance, but yeast strain does.

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Old 01-20-2012, 02:11 PM   #5
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Some strains will attenuate a little more than others. Coming in dry or liquid form has nothing to do with it.

High pitch rates lower the growth rate. If you continue to repitch you'll soon end up with a population of older cells. There is a point where higher pitch rates will no longer speed up the fermentation rate. This has a lot to with the amount of oxygen in the wort. Oxygen is usually the limiting factor in the growth phase. Too much oxygen can lead to less alcohol too.

ABV calculators are not accurate simply because they can't account for energy loss in the growth phase.
http://www.probrewer.com/vbulletin/a...hp/t-1452.html

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Old 01-20-2012, 03:28 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhythmiccycle View Post
I know more sugar causes more abv, and more yeast does not. But does more yeast affect the rate of alcohol production?
A large pitch of yeast limits the growth cycle and ferments out quicker than a smaller pitch.

Sounds like you want Turbo Yeast. 20% ABV given enough sugar and it's done in 5 days. Taste like bunk but I'm sure you're not looking for best taste if your concern is speed of fermentation and ABV level.
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Old 01-20-2012, 05:32 PM   #7
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Thanks, this is all new to me. The beer I made so far taste pretty good, but I want to make stronger beer. I'll try the turbo yeast.

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Old 01-20-2012, 06:14 PM   #8
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No don't try the turbo yeast. Ish. Let's just say its not used to make beer and leave it at that.

If you want to make stronger beer, you need to pitch multiple packets of dry yeast, 2 or 3. Or better yet make a starter with liquid yeast thats of adequate size. Google "Mr Malty", and open up the yeast calculator. It'll give you an idea of how much yeast to pitch based on what you're brewing. It sometimes seems really high, but it's at least one yardstick available for brewers.

And try not to ferment on a clock. Big beers take time or they will taste like rocket fuel. 3-4 weeks primary is common plus 1+ month secondary or extended time in bottle prior to consumption.

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Old 01-20-2012, 09:47 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solbes View Post
No don't try the turbo yeast. Ish. Let's just say its not used to make beer and leave it at that.

If you want to make stronger beer, you need to pitch multiple packets of dry yeast, 2 or 3. Or better yet make a starter with liquid yeast thats of adequate size. Google "Mr Malty", and open up the yeast calculator. It'll give you an idea of how much yeast to pitch based on what you're brewing. It sometimes seems really high, but it's at least one yardstick available for brewers.
If you want a more cost effective route you could buy a packet of yeast and some yeast nutrient(or use a multivitamin), add them to 75-85*F water with molasses with the rough SG your brew will be at. Let it sit for a couple days, make sure to aerate. Then siphon off the spent wort and add fresh wort for a couple more days.

This will allow the yeast population to propagate and multiply two to three times.

Read up on the subject a little, what I stated is a very brief description and I didnt include many details.

Read this link, but you will be buying yeast so you can start at stage 2 or three propagation.

Growing Yeast from a Plate - German brewing and more

BTW, you dont necessarily need flasks, beakers, stir plates, etc(though it probably works better)... I've done it successfully with just a mason jar, a pot, molasses, multivitamin, hydrometer, etc... just be sure to sanitize everything and work carefully. The yeast just needs nutrient, oxygen, and sugar to start reproducing.

Good luck
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Old 01-23-2012, 02:58 AM   #10
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I'm going to try burtonridr's tip. I'm new to home brewing, the first thing I'm trying to learn about is the yeast and abv.

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