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Old 01-04-2013, 07:02 PM   #21
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I have had excellent extract beer and there is a recipe or two that I will continue to make even if everything new is all grain.
I like all grain because I like to do it, it's cheaper and I think I have more ways to tweak the recipe, but I'm sure there are many many extract brewers that can make beer I only dream of making.
The extract come from a mash after all.

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Old 01-04-2013, 07:11 PM   #22
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Does anyone have a easy recipe with instruction? I have wanted to try ag but it is all greek to me!
Have you looked at the AG forum here?

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Old 01-04-2013, 07:13 PM   #23
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...or maybe get your feet wet,like I did,with partial mash with a bag & a 5G SS BK. Partial boil,partial mash works pretty good so far. kinda fun experimentin!
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Old 01-04-2013, 07:15 PM   #24
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How long does all grain take from start to pinching the yeast? From what i understand its takes a lot longer than extract? How much longer?
As for time, that's like asking how long to cook dinner.
Depends on what you are cooking!
The extra time though is milling the grain if you do that. I'm still waiting to buy a mill so I don't do that.
After it's milled, substitute your steeping time for this.

Heating the water to mash temperature. Varies with your setup but stove top to the most bad ass propane setup can vary from nearly an hour on an old stove to 15 minutes with hot tap water.
Mashing is going to take about an hour most of the time. Sparging doesn't take long at all if you batch sparge. You heat the sparge water while the mash is going on so that doesn't take long.

After that you've got wort. Boils the same as an extract. Cools the same as extract if you do a full volume boil.
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Old 01-04-2013, 07:16 PM   #25
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How long does all grain take from start to pinching the yeast? From what i understand its takes a lot longer than extract? How much longer?
Depends on your equipment. This is about what it takes me for my equipment (keggles and big propane burners) and my 10 gallon batches...

Extract:
Heat water to steeping temps - 20 minutes
Steep grains - 20 minutes
Heat water to boiling - 15 minutes
Total: 55 minutes

All-grain:
Heat water to mashing temps - 20 minutes
Dump water into MLT with grains, stir it up and mash - 65 minutes
Vorlaufing and batch sparging - 25 minutes
Heat water to boiling - 20 minutes
Total: 130 minutes

If you fly sparge, that could add an extra hour, or so I've heard. Never fly sparged, so I don't know.
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Old 01-04-2013, 07:18 PM   #26
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My all grain batches are better than my extract batches. That said, my processes got better at the same time. Pitching rates and fermentation temperature management make a huge difference in the final product.

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Old 01-04-2013, 07:21 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by 45_70sharps View Post
I have had excellent extract beer and there is a recipe or two that I will continue to make even if everything new is all grain.
I like all grain because I like to do it, it's cheaper and I think I have more ways to tweak the recipe, but I'm sure there are many many extract brewers that can make beer I only dream of making.
The extract come from a mash after all.
I converted the BCS Robust Porter recipe to a five pound partial mash and I liked it so much I've never made it any other way. I do the mash on my stove top while I'm heating up the rest of the full boil volume outside on my burner.

Utilizing late extract additions is also a real important tool, I think, to have in your arsenal if you are an extract brewer. One of the owners of my local shop is an extract brewer, her husband brews AG, and she makes some of the best danged beers I've ever tasted!
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Old 01-04-2013, 07:26 PM   #28
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I here that! I've made some pretty darn good extract beers thart I think I'll go back to with a tweak or two from my partial mash experiences. but I'm sure others have done the same. Learn new stuff,go back & improve the old stuf kinda thing. What say you?
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Old 01-04-2013, 07:27 PM   #29
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I converted the BCS Robust Porter recipe to a five pound partial mash and I liked it so much I've never made it any other way. I do the mash on my stove top while I'm heating up the rest of the full boil volume outside on my burner.

Utilizing late extract additions is also a real important tool, I think, to have in your arsenal if you are an extract brewer. One of the owners of my local shop is an extract brewer, her husband brews AG, and she makes some of the best danged beers I've ever tasted!
I've got a Black Butte that's an extract with specialty grains that I will probably continue to make for a very long time.
It's just too good to mess with!
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Old 01-04-2013, 07:29 PM   #30
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I just want to give my two cents here (maybe it’s only worth a penny.) I do not believe that I can taste a difference if fresh extract is used. I am mostly all-grain now, but not because extracts have “off” flavors. I like the hobby, and all-grain brewing gives me more to do on brew day. Furthermore, I can also control my all-grain extract in many interesting ways. For example, I can have higher alcohol vs. more body based on the mash temperature. You can also control the body, head, and color all based on your mash procedure.

I just think that all-grain brewers have made, and generally have learned from (and hopefully avoid) many of the mistakes that we do as new home brewers. We learn which sanitation techniques work best for us, how to adapt our temperature controls, effective yeast management for our unique setups, and so on. What I am trying to say is that all-grain may not have that “twang” because the average all-grain brewer is not making the mistakes a first time brewer often makes.

That is not to say that you can’t make a bad all-grain beer. I made two this past year that I did not like.

Just make sure you control all your temperatures, with special care taken to make sure that your fermentation temperature is correct for your yeast. (Or, your yeast matches the temperatures that you have for fermenting.) Make sure that you use effective sanitization procedures. Use fresh extract. And finally, give your beer time. If you do all this, I do not think you will be able to tell the difference between extract and all-grain.

Mark

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