New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Difference between dry hopping & flameout hopping?




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-24-2011, 02:25 AM   #1
aidan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Nelson, New Zealand
Posts: 344
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default Difference between dry hopping & flameout hopping?

I'm trying to figure out the difference between dry hopping and adding hops at flameout since both are supposed to be for creating aroma.

So far I've done both on all my brews. But I'm wondering if both serve the same purpose or if they achieve different results?

I'm guessing that one difference is that the flameout hops also contribute a bit towards flavour whereas the dry hopping effect is limited to aroma - but I dunno, that's just a guess.

So if you have a limited amount of hops, which gives you the best bang for your hops, flameout or dry, or split between both?

And what is ideal amount of time for dry hopping? I see 7-10 days mentioned in some posts, just wondering if you are wasting the hops with anything less than 7 days?

Searching the posts for answers the best I've found is:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Well, the flame out additions ARE different than dryhopping. Dryhopping is done after fermentation, because the active fermentation causes tons of co2 to be produced and blown off, and blowing off all of those lovely hops aromas. That's why it's done later.

The flame out additions are not really blown off by fermentation, because the oils are already "in" the wort, if that makes sense. Adding hops after the wort is cooled, but before fermentation is over, is not going to give you the effects of either. I'd say that you'll "lose" the hops aroma that you would have had from adding them at flame out, before chilling.
from http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/understanding-hop-schedule-229240/index2.html, but that does not answer my questions.


__________________

Blogging about the experiences of a new home brewer at BeerAndGarden.com

"Pursue Hoppiness With Diligence"
aidan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2011, 02:50 AM   #2
trevorc13
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Posts: 403
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Dry hopping for about four days is how I get the biggest fresh hop aroma. Flameout hops give a subtle hop aroma.



__________________

Thanks for the input

trevorc13 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2011, 02:52 AM   #3
aidan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Nelson, New Zealand
Posts: 344
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by trevorc13 View Post
Dry hopping for about four days is how I get the biggest fresh hop aroma. Flameout hops give a subtle hop aroma.
So do you reckon you don't get as much bang for the buck with flameout hops? Or do they achieve something else that dry hopping does not achieve?
__________________

Blogging about the experiences of a new home brewer at BeerAndGarden.com

"Pursue Hoppiness With Diligence"
aidan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2011, 02:57 AM   #4
MalFet
/bɪər nərd/
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
MalFet's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: NYC / Kathmandu
Posts: 8,143
Liked 1197 Times on 790 Posts
Likes Given: 533

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aidan
So do you reckon you don't get as much bang for the buck with flameout hops? Or do they achieve something else that dry hopping does not achieve?
They're different. Personally, I don't love dry hopping, but I do significant flame out additions with most of the beers I make. Not to knock it for anyone else, but dry hopping tends to produce a more resinous tone than I usually like.
__________________

"Be excellent to each other." -Benjamin Franklin

MalFet is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2011, 03:04 AM   #5
jonmohno
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Corn, High Fructose Corn Fortress, IA
Posts: 5,780
Liked 402 Times on 356 Posts
Likes Given: 1156

Default

I dont know yet havent tried dry hopping but i will tell you this doing late additons, put it this way the aroma has been very short lived for me,im talking not even 3 week bottled contionioned,maybe i didnt use enough i dont know i feel even flame out you still have to chill it giving at least 15 min steep time before its chilled to me it seems this will flavor it somebody correct me.

__________________
jonmohno is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2011, 03:12 AM   #6
weirdboy
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 7,738
Liked 388 Times on 314 Posts
Likes Given: 38

Default

I do both...

__________________
weirdboy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2011, 03:19 AM   #7
ThePearsonFam
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Virginia Beach, VA, Virginia
Posts: 884
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

So, primarily, hops contribute bitterness, flavor and aroma... no duh, right?

The longer you boil, the more the hops are isomerized, resulting in more bitterness. How much bitterness is mostly influenced by the amount of the hops, the Alpha Acid content of the hop contribution, the volume of wort being boiled, and the overall gravity of the wort. So, in order to isomerize, you really need to BOIL the hops.

So, the longer the boil, the less flavor and the more bitterness. The converse is true as well. The shorter you boil, the less bitterness and more flavor. Adding hops closer to flameout, will result in the least amount of bittering while adding flavor. It will add aroma too, but mostly flavor.

Dry hopping adds 99% aroma since it doesn't occur at high temps. As previously stated, it shouldn't be done during the more aggressive fermentation phase since the CO2 being released by the yeasties will drive the aroma right out the airlock/blow-off. Give it ~7 days in the fermenter before adding the dry hops. Don't worry about sanitizing the hops but use sanitary practices when opening/closing the fermenter, and DO NOT STIR (don't want to introduce oxygen). Leave the hops in there as long as you like, 7-10 days is fine. Some of the aroma will fade with time, so don't be afraid if it's really strong at first.

__________________
ThePearsonFam is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2011, 03:28 AM   #8
ThePearsonFam
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Virginia Beach, VA, Virginia
Posts: 884
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Let me clarify... since your question was between flameout and dry hop additions... Both are intended for aroma, yes, but you'll get the most, long-term aroma from your dry hop addition. The flameout is more subtle and will provide both flavor and aroma. Kinda difficult to describe the impact without actually shoving you nose in it and pouring some into your throat.

What style beer are you attempting to brew, or are you simply looking for general information?

__________________
ThePearsonFam is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2011, 09:07 AM   #9
aidan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Nelson, New Zealand
Posts: 344
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePearsonFam View Post
Let me clarify... since your question was between flameout and dry hop additions... Both are intended for aroma, yes, but you'll get the most, long-term aroma from your dry hop addition. The flameout is more subtle and will provide both flavor and aroma. Kinda difficult to describe the impact without actually shoving you nose in it and pouring some into your throat.

What style beer are you attempting to brew, or are you simply looking for general information?
Yeah, just general info, though I usually brew pale/amber ales, APA.

I used to be under the impression that the hops at flameout were for flavour, NOT aroma but reading old posts on this forum today I read that the flameout hops are actually for aroma, NOT flavour.

Anyone got any opinions on which gives you the best bang for buck for your hops? I guess flavour is more important than aroma when you are talking about hops impact, but aroma enhances the flavour so you need a bit of aroma too. But let's say you had a 100g of Cascade hops for a 6gal batch and you wanted the maximum hops impact with the given amount of hops and a target IBU of let's say 40. Ok, you would divide up your additions, lets say for simplicity, 60min, 20min, 0min and/or dry hopping. Your IBUs will come mostly from the 60min and a bit from the 20min and you figure the amounts to use for those 2 additions. Then with the remaining hops, you can split them between the 0min and dry - How do you divide them up for maximum hops impact? That's what I'm trying to understand. Up to this point I've put the bulk in at flameout and just a smaller amount for dry hopping.
__________________

Blogging about the experiences of a new home brewer at BeerAndGarden.com

"Pursue Hoppiness With Diligence"
aidan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2011, 11:10 AM   #10
MalFet
/bɪər nərd/
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
MalFet's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: NYC / Kathmandu
Posts: 8,143
Liked 1197 Times on 790 Posts
Likes Given: 533

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aidan
How do you divide them up for maximum hops impact?
Add them all at 60 minutes.

I'm sure that's not the answer you are looking for, but there's no better one unfortunately. Different hop additions do different things. Asking what gives "the most impact" would be like saying "I have $100 for food. What should I buy to maximize deliciousness?" You'll get a different answer for every person you ask.

If you are just looking for a standard hopping schedule, there are tons of good recipes on this board. Perhaps start with one of those as a guide? 1/2 oz Summit at 60min, 1oz Perle at 20min, and 1oz Cascade at 0min will give you something nicely SNPAish, for example.


__________________

"Be excellent to each other." -Benjamin Franklin

MalFet is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dry Hopping in the Keg.... RedHeadBrew25 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 11 07-19-2010 02:46 PM
Dry Hopping BigJefe Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 06-16-2010 09:44 PM
Dry Hopping ianhey Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 06-10-2010 07:36 PM
About dry hopping Righlander Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 19 07-26-2008 01:36 PM
Dry Hopping... rflem550 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 08-31-2007 07:01 PM