Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > dead yeast not dead -- how to cultivate and preserve?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-24-2008, 12:40 AM   #1
FSBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: SE Asia
Posts: 187
Default dead yeast not dead -- how to cultivate and preserve?

I posted earlier about a liquid yeast that arrived here after 3 weeks in transit. I made a starter for it Friday night to see if I could use it Saturday night in a batch of dopplebock. Zero activity, nada, nichts, etc.

I'm a lazy fellow, and couldn't be bothered to dump it out, but I went ahead and made my beer with a packet of dried yeast.

Monday night (day 3) I took a close look at the starter and can see some tiny bubbles making their way to the top. You have to look closely, but they're there. Now I'm thinking since these liquid yeasts are suppose to be better, and I can't really get them in here due to transit times, maybe I should work on cultivating this yeast and preserving it for a future batch. The question is, what would be the best way to do this?

I thought about making another cup or so of boiled water & DME and adding the yeast fuel we've been discussing in the other thread. What suggestions do you all have? If that is successful, what is the best way of preserving it until my next lager?

The yeast was a wyeast lager yeast.

__________________
FSBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2008, 12:48 AM   #2
Danek
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 1,276
Liked 11 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Depending on how long until your next brew, this might be of interest:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=35891

__________________
Bottle conditioning: Pliny the Elder clone; Tramp's Overcoat Barley Wine
Next up: Vanilla Porter
Danek is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2008, 06:36 PM   #3
fratermus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: 75081
Posts: 1,190
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FSBrewer View Post
I thought about making another cup or so of boiled water & DME and adding the yeast fuel we've been discussing in the other thread. What suggestions do you all have? If that is successful, what is the best way of preserving it until my next lager?

The yeast was a wyeast lager yeast.
I have been having a great deal of fun innoculating agar slants from liquid yeast packs (and pitching the remainder into the batch-at-hand). I have not innoculated from a starter for hygiene reasons.

I bet you could just refrigerate the whole starter and hit it with the new wort/energizer a couple of days before the next lager run.
fratermus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2008, 12:31 AM   #4
FSBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: SE Asia
Posts: 187
Default

Yes, that first reply with link sounds like an interesting possible long-term solution for me, but getting the equipment might be troublesome for me here.

Since this is a bock yeast I'm guessing it will probably be a couple of months before I'm ready to use it.

If I wanted to just store my starter in the fridge, what would be the best way to do so? I have mason jars and beer bottles at my disposal, but would the starter need to be able to breath? Or wait until the activity has more or less stopped and then cap it and store it? How long can it be stored for?

__________________
FSBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2008, 01:47 AM   #5
Hoosierbrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Muncie, IN, Indiana
Posts: 807
Liked 17 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I wash my yeast and then save it for months. You can store for up to a year in a fridge. I wold build it up some, let it settle out, then follow the yeast washing thread on here. I cultured pacman from a bottle of Rogue and am using to to ferment now and then I will get 4 conatiners out of it for additional batches. I will also wash those batches to keep it going. I store in mason jars.

__________________

Primary 1: Oatmeal Coffee Stout
Secondary: American Mild IPA
Keg 1: English Bitter

Next up: Double IPA for friend, Kolsch, Graff, American Wheat, Dunkleweizen.

Hoosierbrewer is offline
derekge Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-26-2008, 12:28 AM   #6
FSBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: SE Asia
Posts: 187
Default

Thanks, I just read this thread http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=41768 and it looks easier than I thought it would be. Would it be OK if I stored the yeast in a capped beer bottle in the fridge or shouldn't it be capped that tight? I don't have that kind of small mason jar.

__________________
FSBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-19-2012, 09:45 PM   #7
derekge
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 54
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoosierbrewer View Post
I wash my yeast and then save it for months. You can store for up to a year in a fridge. I wold build it up some, let it settle out, then follow the yeast washing thread on here. I cultured pacman from a bottle of Rogue and am using to to ferment now and then I will get 4 conatiners out of it for additional batches. I will also wash those batches to keep it going. I store in mason jars.
I wash my yeast too and have had the yeastie taste come through on some batches. From what I was told, the yeast cells will start to die after just 7-14 days. I would have my washed yeast sitting for a month or so and when I was pitching, I was adding dead yeast cells to my wort!

If you notice on white labs vials they have expiration dates and recommend to do a starter after that date. The dead yeast cells fall to the bottom and the good yeast remains on top (below the beer). This exact idea that Hoosierbrewer talks about was proposed to me: kick start your starter! Basically, do a starter for your washed yeast and let it sit. Wash it again (this time your getting the healthy active yeast) and make another starter with it. Then pitch this second starter into your main batch. Voila! you've just gotten rid of the dead yeast cells!
__________________
derekge is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is my yeast dead? BeerBelly Fermentation & Yeast 4 09-28-2009 03:56 PM
Is my yeast dead? jasonsimoneau Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 08-15-2009 04:55 PM
Dead Yeast dec Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 05-15-2009 07:00 PM
Dead Yeast? Holmesbrewer General Beer Discussion 8 08-22-2008 01:12 PM
Dead Yeast? bluedragoon85 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 15 07-29-2008 01:30 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS