New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Creamy Foam on top of beer after 4 weeks




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-03-2010, 02:30 AM   #1
Bassman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 255
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default Creamy Foam on top of beer after 4 weeks

Last week I went to bottle and had a bit of a problem, I posted about it in the bottling & kegging forum. I had to rack the beer back into the fermenter with the priming solution in it. So it roused up the yeast a lot. I was advised to give it a week to settle again. Tonight I took a peek and I noticed a creamy foam on the top. It smells fine, a bit yeasty, but fine.

My assumption is that the temperature in my apartment raised a few degrees and the CO2 came out and raised some yeasty foam to the top. When I went to bottle last week I was .002 higher than I expected in terms of specific gravity. I'm not so much worried as curious as to why it happened. It smells great, like I wrote, which is good. Should I bottle in the next few days?



__________________
Bassman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2010, 02:49 AM   #2
Suthrncomfrt1884
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Rockford, Illinois
Posts: 4,079
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Keep checking your gravity. If it's the same after two readings a few days apart, go ahead and bottle. It sounds like your priming solution caused a little extra fermentation. This created a krausen and that's probably what you're seeing.



__________________
He who drinks beer sleeps well. He who sleeps well cannot sin. He who does not sin goes to heaven.

Another HERMS rig...
Suthrncomfrt1884 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2010, 02:49 AM   #3
cvstrat
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 691
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

So you're saying you racked it onto priming sugar and didn't bottle it? I'm not sure that was a great idea unless there was a huge amount of suspended yeast.

If that's the case I'm not sure how you'd know exactly how much of the priming sugar is remaining. That could make it difficult to know how much to add in again. That variation in your expected gravity is pretty small which is totally fine. That's actually pretty close so it's good. I'd say perhaps use a little less priming sugar than last time and go for it.

__________________
cvstrat is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2010, 03:20 AM   #4
Bassman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 255
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I had racked into the bottling bucket and added the priming sugar. I then had a problem with my bottling bucket leaking, which was my fault. There was no way to bottle so I racked it into the only appropriate container, the fermenter. That happened last Tuesday.

I'll check the gravity tomorrow and Thursday. I'm also going to prime a little less. It's a Pale Ale so I can go lower than 4 oz.

__________________
Bassman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2010, 12:14 PM   #5
dzlater
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,030
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 105

Default

I'd just let the yeast ferment out the priming sugar you already added and then start over.

__________________
dzlater is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2010, 12:28 PM   #6
Suthrncomfrt1884
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Rockford, Illinois
Posts: 4,079
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dzlater View Post
I'd just let the yeast ferment out the priming sugar you already added and then start over.
+1. No need to add less priming sugar. The original priming sugar should ferment all the way out.
__________________
He who drinks beer sleeps well. He who sleeps well cannot sin. He who does not sin goes to heaven.

Another HERMS rig...
Suthrncomfrt1884 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-04-2010, 12:49 AM   #7
Bassman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 255
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I did a gravity test and a visual/taste test. My gravity is 2 points lower than I measured it when I went to bottle it. My guess is that I roused the yeast and it did a better job fermenting. Also I thought I had a little too much residual sweetness last week and I tasted less of that this week. I may be getting some fruitiness/apple but this was 1968 yeast and I think that makes sense, I am not getting tartness. The beer is still quite cloudy and I'm guessing if I waited a week more it would not hurt.

__________________
Bassman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-04-2010, 04:42 AM   #8
dracus
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: cincinnati, ohio
Posts: 296
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Only 4oz. I always put 5oz of priming sugar in my batches sometimes more in the case of a hefeweizen.



__________________
dracus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
3 weeks 70? Is anyone's beer really that good after only 3 weeks in the bottle? TheH2 Bottling/Kegging 29 12-11-2012 07:39 PM
My first glass of beer from my kegged batch... all foam. The second? all foam. 3rd? nerdlogic Bottling/Kegging 24 11-15-2012 02:14 PM
pouring a glass from keg: beer, foam, beer bmbigda Bottling/Kegging 11 12-21-2010 09:28 PM
All Foam no beer at 10 PSI Matt Bottling/Kegging 2 12-25-2006 09:30 PM
Velvet Beer and other "creamy" beers NEPABREWER Recipes/Ingredients 3 04-23-2006 01:48 AM