Home Brew Forums

Home Brew Forums (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Beginners Beer Brewing Forum (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/)
-   -   a couple more rookie questions (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/couple-more-rookie-questions-135323/)

HighLife 09-05-2009 01:22 AM

a couple more rookie questions
 
1st-besides a starter kit, what other hardware will I need ?
2nd-what is the average time that it takes brewing to being able to drink it (and does it depend on the style ?)
3rd- my dad grows leafy hops around one of his decks (for looks) would these be sutible to use?
Thank you for your patenice with a green horn :)

arturo7 09-05-2009 01:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HighLife (Post 1528317)
1st-besides a starter kit, what other hardware will I need ?
2nd-what is the average time that it takes brewing to being able to drink it (and does it depend on the style ?)
3rd- my dad grows leafy hops around one of his decks (for looks) would these be sutible to use?
Thank you for your patenice with a green horn :)

1- depends on what you got with the starter kit

2- minimun two weeks if your kegging a wheat beer, up to two+ years for a barrel-aged sour

3- depends on which species

HighLife 09-05-2009 01:37 AM

cool. thanks for the reply. I guess I'll start some more in depth research and go from there. thanks again

XXguy 09-05-2009 01:46 AM

Read the Wiki here - it's a great resource. Look at the top of this page.

Also - bigger beers = longer times.

Patience is a virtue when it comes to homebrew. Get a 2nd (3rd, 4th, 5th) fermenter rather than rush your beers. Yeast don't know you're in a hurry to drink.

Nurmey 09-05-2009 01:50 AM

It's hard to say because it depends on the kit but usually the only "extra" you need to get a batch in the primary is a large pot.

Six to seven weeks from kettle to glass is about normal. Three to four weeks in primary, 3 weeks in bottle to carb.

Unknown hops are usually used for aroma because you don't know the bittering factor.

HighLife 09-05-2009 01:50 AM

Thanks XX. yeah I'm not in a big rush, I was just curious if it took weeks or months, if not longer for some. It'll still be hard waiting for that first batch though.

HotbreakHotel 09-05-2009 01:52 AM

Most good starter kits will include the minimum you need to make a basic batch. As you get into it you will probably "evolve," but it should get you started. You'll need to think about a way to cool the wort. If you go to How to Brew - By John Palmer you will find a lot of great information. This is the book that got me started.

Generally speaking, if you are not kegging, the minimum would be about one month between brewing and drinking. Two weeks to ferment, two weeks to condition and carbonate. Patience is a virtue with brewing, but when you start it can be hard to be patient, believe me I know!!

You can use your home grown hops, but IMHO it may be beneficial to not to use them at first until you have more experience. But if they are ready to be picked now you can read about how to dry them and use them later. If you want to use them fresh it would be a harvest ale because the taste is way, way different. I'm working on a harvest ale now, and I am finding a lot of new challenges with it!

Good luck and have fun. There is lot's of good info on this site, and a lot of good brewers to help.

HighLife 09-05-2009 01:55 AM

Thanks to every one for all the great info. I'm looking forward to getting started, plus with Michigan winter coming I'll have lot's of time to experiment.Thanks again to you all

pretzelb 09-05-2009 02:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nurmey (Post 1528349)
It's hard to say because it depends on the kit but usually the only "extra" you need to get a batch in the primary is a large pot.

I just started and the pot was the only thing that I really felt like I needed to get going. But I suppose a nice spoon for stirring might also be on the list if you don't have tons of kitchen tools.

Regarding the time, my first 3 batches were around 2 weeks fermenting and then 2 weeks in the bottle. But my 4th batch is still bubbling after 2 weeks. I'm still not sure which is more normal but after you bottle I'd say 2 weeks is minimum.

If you have the room then multiple batches is a nice option. Say you make your first batch on the weekend. Set it aside and think about it for a week or two. Then make the second batch using what you've learned. Then it might be time to bottle the first, which leads to more learning. Then you can think about making the 3rd batch. Then comes bottling the 2nd. Then maybe it's tasting the first. Repeat. Or at least that's the theory.

LordHedgie 09-05-2009 05:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HighLife (Post 1528317)
1st-besides a starter kit, what other hardware will I need ?

Nothing really, except most starter kits don't come with a stockpot and you'll need that. The rest just makes your life easier.

Quote:

Originally Posted by HighLife (Post 1528317)
2nd-what is the average time that it takes brewing to being able to drink it (and does it depend on the style ?)

It depends entirely on style. That, and whether you force-carbonate into a keg or bottle condition/keg condition. I have a hefe recipe that I force carbonate, and it takes six days from brewing to drinking. That's not normal... If you're bottling, most beers will probably take four weeks (two in primary, two in the bottles), but some can take much longer...

Quote:

Originally Posted by HighLife (Post 1528317)
3rd- my dad grows leafy hops around one of his decks (for looks) would these be sutible to use?

Homebrewing is all about experimentation. Chances are they aren't great brewing hops, but who knows. I wouldn't use them in your first batch or two, but once you've got the brewing part down give them a try and see if they're any good.


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:26 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.