Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Cost
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-04-2013, 04:30 PM   #1
crowdent
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: St Louis, Missouri
Posts: 8
Likes Given: 14

Default Cost

I have been really interested in home brewing for sometime but I just never followed through with it. I have ask a local brewer if it was expense and he told me he stop because it was costing to much. Does it cost a lot to maintain?

Thanks


Thanks

__________________
crowdent is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-04-2013, 04:32 PM   #2
hoppheadIPA
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Navarre, Florida
Posts: 192
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

It's as expensive as you want to make it, or as cheap as you can get it.... Really, it's not expensive if you research and don't buy "bling" gear.

__________________
hoppheadIPA is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-04-2013, 04:34 PM   #3
twistr25
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
twistr25's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,400
Liked 113 Times on 106 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

Up front is the worst, but it depends on how big you want to go. 1 gallon batches you may just need a small bucket to ferment in and you can use a regular soup pot you already have for boiling. Bigger batches cost more to get the equipment. I am pretty well established now and really only spend on ingredients which average around $40 for a 5 gallon batch or about 50 beers.

__________________

____________________
Primary: Gin and Tonic IPA
Bottled: All Hallow's Eve Pumpkin Ale
Kegs: Dark Skies Black IPA Redux, Sunset Orange Kolsch Redux
Future:Who Knows
2013 Previous: Sunrise Honey Rye Pale Ale, Dark Skies Black IPA, Sunset Orange Kolsch, All Hallow's Eve Pumpkin Ale, Raining Hops and Dogs IPA

Awards/Recognition
Dark Skies Black IPA - 2nd Place at a local comp. Score of 39 from a BJCP judge

Twistr25 Recipes

GT Keezer Build

twistr25 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-04-2013, 04:36 PM   #4
twalte
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Roseville (Sacramento), California
Posts: 394
Liked 29 Times on 27 Posts
Likes Given: 38

Default

The cost is all on the front end to get started....after that, additional spending is not necessary but some like to upgrade equipment to larger, shinier or automated. In addition, you may want to start taking control of other processes like crushing barley, harvesting yeast, etc (all of which requires more equipment, but provides an ROI over time)

This poll has been going on which shows costs.

Once you get everything you need to brew, the expenses can stop except for ingredients. However, I am about $2k into the hobby with another $1k planned to finish it out. I will be done for a while and will have everything I need to brew for the next 30 years.

It's a great hobby...and you can start small with a homebrewing kit from Midwest or Northern Brewer. You could also play with one gallon batches if you want to limit equipment purchases and learn.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/poll...rewing-378239/

__________________

"You can’t be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline – it helps if you have some kind of football team, or some nuclear weapons but at the very least you need a beer"
- Frank Zappa

twalte is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-04-2013, 04:37 PM   #5
cramar
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 82
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Well, "expensive" is a relative term, but I'd say no, it's not expensive but it does cost money.
You can get a beginners 5 gallon fermenting kit plus recipe kit for, I dunno, $150 US or so, maybe a bit less, that should have everything you need to brew.
1 gallon kits are even less.

Price it out online, one you have the fermenting kit all you need is a recipe kit each time you want to brew, price it out.

__________________
cramar is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-04-2013, 04:40 PM   #6
rklinck
Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rklinck's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 672
Liked 66 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 49

Default

It does not have to be expensive. You can get a basic equipment kit from around $65 or $70. You also have to buy the ingredients for each brew. For beginners, ingredients for a 5 gallon batch (which makes about 48 beers) start at around $25 and go up based on the type of beer and how complicated you want to get. So you are paying $.50 per beer after the startup costs.

It gets expensive because most people get hooked and quickly decide that there are logs of additional equipment that they "need." I have been at it for about two months and I have already gotten a large brew pot, a turkey fryer to boil outside, accessories for the whole brewing process, and a kegging system for two kegs.

The upside is that I am quickly approaching the point that I will not need to buy any beer for home consumption because my pipeline of beers is getting full.

__________________
rklinck is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-04-2013, 04:42 PM   #7
kh54s10
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Tiverton, Rhode Island
Posts: 7,030
Liked 656 Times on 556 Posts
Likes Given: 170

Default

If you are going to brew to save money you will need to do several things. The first is that you will have to brew all grain. I think that the price of extracts prohibit you from brewing for less than you can buy commercially.

You will probably have to reuse your yeast and you will have to buy your grains in bulk.

The upfront cost for the equipment is pretty large. Even with BIAB, which requires less equipment there is a sizable upfront cost. I brewed for a year before my cost per bottle fell below $2.

__________________
kh54s10 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-04-2013, 04:45 PM   #8
crowdent
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: St Louis, Missouri
Posts: 8
Likes Given: 14

Default

I haven't seen his setup and when I did ask I got a quick answer . " he isn't doing it anymore" so I figured it was just a quick answer so I didn't ask more. Do most of you do it for hobby with a dream to become more or just a hobby?

__________________
crowdent is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-04-2013, 04:49 PM   #9
rklinck
Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rklinck's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 672
Liked 66 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 49

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kh54s10 View Post
If you are going to brew to save money you will need to do several things. The first is that you will have to brew all grain. I think that the price of extracts prohibit you from brewing for less than you can buy commercially.

You will probably have to reuse your yeast and you will have to buy your grains in bulk.

The upfront cost for the equipment is pretty large. Even with BIAB, which requires less equipment there is a sizable upfront cost. I brewed for a year before my cost per bottle fell below $2.
I have to disagree. You can buy extract only ingredient kits starting at around $25. That makes ingredient costs around $.50 per beer. There are certainly the start up costs (which can be as low as $70 for an extract brewer) and some incidental costs (e.g., the cost of water and increased use of either electricity or gas to brew), but those are rather small in the large scheme of things. I currently do partial mash BIAB and my batches run me around $30. I don't harvest yeast and buy my grains in increments of 5 pounds or less.
__________________
rklinck is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-04-2013, 04:51 PM   #10
twalte
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Roseville (Sacramento), California
Posts: 394
Liked 29 Times on 27 Posts
Likes Given: 38

Default

I enjoy it as a hobby...

I am constantly learning new things...so it is mentally challenging

I enjoy the brewing process....with a beer in my hand and good tunes

I enjoy testing and sampling in "the cellar" while it ferments

I enjoy the end result. There is something so cool when you pour a great tasting beer and you realize that you made that.

So overall, it is a hobby that occupies a great deal of my time.

__________________

"You can’t be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline – it helps if you have some kind of football team, or some nuclear weapons but at the very least you need a beer"
- Frank Zappa

twalte is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how much does it cost... for you? stevedasleeve Extract Brewing 60 02-05-2010 04:37 AM
How much will this cost? Mustangfreak Bottling/Kegging 10 02-07-2009 01:35 AM
Cost of CO2 DrugCoder Bottling/Kegging 39 01-10-2009 02:25 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS