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Old 05-20-2011, 03:18 AM   #1
Hartzelly
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Default Corn sugar and cane sugar priming

Ok quick question ive heard that you can use 2/3 cup of cane sugar as a subsitute for priming instead of the 3/4 cup of corn sugar but it would take maybe a day or two longer for the yeast to break down the sugar to carbonate with barley if none at all taste difference is this true? and if so what about using powdered cane sugar its alot more of a fine sugar..

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Old 05-20-2011, 03:26 AM   #2
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I've used both and notice no discernable taste difference between the two.

I don't know what you mean by "a day or two longer for the yeast to break down the sugar to carbonate with barley" - but I've not noticed any difference in time in carbonating after priming with corn or cane sugar.

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Old 05-20-2011, 04:18 AM   #3
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oh ok sweet so its fine to use cane sugar then, and oops i just missed spelled it meant you can barely tell a difference did it take yours any longer to carbonate? or is it about the same?

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Old 05-20-2011, 04:24 AM   #4
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About the same - give it three weeks at room temperature. And go by weight, not volume, when you measure the sugar.

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Old 05-20-2011, 02:09 PM   #5
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Something to note, it takes less Table Sugar (Sucrose) than Corn Sugar (Glucose) by weight to achieve the same carbonation levels. I use the below calculator when I prime my beer.

http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html

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Old 05-20-2011, 02:11 PM   #6
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It takes as long as it needs to take regardless of the sugar used. The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

Temp and gravity are the two factors that contribute to the time it takes to carb beer. But if a beer's not ready yet, or seems low carbed, and you added the right amount of sugar to it, then it's not stalled, it's just not time yet.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

If a beer isn't carbed by "x number of weeks" you just have to give them more time. If you added your sugar, then the beer will carb up eventually, it's really a foolroof process. All beers will carb up eventually. A lot of new brewers think they have to "troubleshoot" a bottling issue, when there really is none, the beer knows how to carb itself. In fact if you run beersmiths carbing calculator, some lower grav beers don't even require additional sugar to reach their minimum level of carbonation. Just time.

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