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Old 04-18-2010, 06:23 PM   #1
jerzeedevil13
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Default cooling wort question

So my pot ( 8 gallon ) is too big for my sink, I have a double sink.
Is it ok to pour hot wort into cold water in fermenter ? I have an ale pail that just fits in the sink. Will this have any negative effect on the beer ?

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Old 04-18-2010, 06:28 PM   #2
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Make sure the cold water has been boiled and chilled, and not just from the tap (even filtered).

Even better is to get a wort chiller.

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Old 04-18-2010, 06:30 PM   #3
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You risk hot-side aeration (wet cardboard) flavors. I've poured hot wort (post mash not post boil) at 170F and not had problems. But right after the boil might be more of an issue.

Ideally you need to get or make a chiller.

Otherwise, you can buy some bottles of water. Remove the labels. Freeze and sanitize the bottles. Then put the frozen bottle in your wort to lower the temp.

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Old 04-18-2010, 06:37 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beernik View Post

Otherwise, you can buy some bottles of water. Remove the labels. Freeze and sanitize the bottles. Then put the frozen bottle in your wort to lower the temp.
good idea, never thought of that
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Old 04-18-2010, 06:39 PM   #5
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I guess my best bet is to invest in a chiller or maybe get a 5 gallon pot that can fit in my sink since the boils are only 2.5 to 3 gallons anyway.
The 8 gallon almost seems like a waste.

The bottle idea seems like a good one if you can get the labels off without any glue being left behind.
Thanks for the advice guys.

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Old 04-18-2010, 07:07 PM   #6
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I would definitely recommend getting a wort chiller. Makes a real difference to your beer and makes cooling the wort quickly very easy.

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Old 04-19-2010, 12:48 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerzeedevil13 View Post
I guess my best bet is to invest in a chiller or maybe get a 5 gallon pot that can fit in my sink since the boils are only 2.5 to 3 gallons anyway.
The 8 gallon almost seems like a waste.

The bottle idea seems like a good one if you can get the labels off without any glue being left behind.
Thanks for the advice guys.
If your stove can boil more it would be a good idea to do it, more boil will make better beer. Then use a few sanitized ice bottles once it is in the ale pail and cool that sucker down.

Look into some foam eliminator and I bet you could boil over 5 gallons if your stove can handle it. My stove can do 5 gallons no sweat, and with the foam eliminator I can do a boil 2 inches from the top no boilover. The stuff I use is called Five Star Defoamer from Austin Homebrew Supply. Highly recommended.
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Old 04-19-2010, 03:59 AM   #8
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An 8 gallon pot on a stove should be able to span 2 burners. If it does, you should be able to do a full boil.

A spray bottle of water is pretty good for controling boilovers.

The frozen bottle solution wasn't my idea. I remember someone on here posting it a long time ago. Rubbing alcohol or "goo gone" should take any glue residue off.

When I was doing partial boils, I'd semi freeze two gallons of bottled water and pour them into my 3 gallons hot wort. I could get it down to 140F pretty fast that way. Then I'd use ice baths to take it the rest of the way down.

Speaking of which, you could do that in a bath tub.

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Old 04-19-2010, 05:03 AM   #9
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I had the same problem. What I did was go to home depot and get the cheapest copper tubing and just turn it around my pot and attach some tubing so it can connect to my sink and expel into my sink. Total investment might have been about 60 bucks including connectors and tubing but I do have 50ft of copper tubing in the chiller. Works pretty well and can bring my pot down to pitch-able temps in about 7 minutes.. maybe 10 on a bad day if the temperature of the input is high. Yes it's money but it makes life easy on brew day.

Bath tub would also work. I would not downsize the kettle though.

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Old 04-19-2010, 04:26 PM   #10
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I use my bathtub and a couple of 10lb bags of ice in the water to make an ice bath. adding the bags one at a time to the water will get it down to pitchable temps in about 12-15 minutes (I do it with the pot covered cause god knows what bacteria is floating around the bathroom- this makes the chilling take longer). then i use cold top off water in the fermenter...

i can't wait to move out of an apartment into our new house so i can brew outside...

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