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Old 03-26-2009, 11:27 PM   #1
daveooph131
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Default Controversy!!!

Ok so I went and made my final purchases today at a local shop...I'm going to brew my first batch this weekend.

When talking to the owner there were some things he said that contradicted what I’ve read in books or on this form. Can you help me clarify?
1) After cooling the wort he told me the “trub” will be on the bottom of the kettle and to siphon the wort into the primary until you just about hit the nasty pile up of cold break/trub/bad protein or whatever. (Thoughts / Opinions?)
2) The shop owner was against rehydrating the yeast….Apparently it is unnecessary and not that good for the yeast. (Thoughts / Opinions?)
3) He told me to purchase a kit. The kit was a Bavarian Hefenfeizen that has everything in a box. Hops/malt/adjunct/ect….Are kits like this good? Next time I think I want to purchase all the hops ect… separately.

Thanks – brew on

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Old 03-26-2009, 11:38 PM   #2
Shawn Hargreaves
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1) It doesn't really matter. Some people like to keep the trub out of their fermenter. Me, I just pour the whole thing in. It'll settle out over the next couple of weeks and won't make it into the bottles, so I don't see much point worrying trying to avoid it earlier on (and siphoning hot wort is not my idea of fun, much easier just to pour it through a funnel :-)

2) I've always heard that rehydrating dry yeast is a good idea, but that it will work even if you don't. This is just second hand, though: I mostly use liquid yeast these days, but did rehydrate every time I brewed with dry yeast.

3) It really depends on the kit. Assuming it's a good recipe, buying a kit that includes all the right ingredients already measured out for you is exactly the same as buying those same ingredients separately and measuring them yourself. Buying them separately gives you more flexibility if you want to tweak the recipe, but if you're just starting out, I would recommend you follow an existing recipe at least for your first couple of brews.

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Old 03-26-2009, 11:40 PM   #3
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1) Unnecessary but it won't do any harm.

2) Modern dry yeast doesn't require rehydrating, just sprinkle it in.

3) Kits are fine as long as they are fresh. It's one less thing for a beginner to have to think about. Purchasing everything separately is great as long as you know what you are doing. My LHBS sells their own house kits rather than premade factory kits and I would suggest something like that if available.

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Old 03-26-2009, 11:40 PM   #4
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1) Not a big deal
2) Some people say rehydrate, some don't. I personally just dump in dry yeast most of the time.
3) Nothing wrong with kits at all. 99.9% of kits are tried and true recipes developed by brewers.

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Old 03-26-2009, 11:42 PM   #5
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Welcome. I only have 5 batches under my belt but here is my take.
1) Some people poor it all in the primary, some siphon as you were told and some (like me) use a strainer to remove the coagulated protein/gunk. Dont know that it really matters because it will all settle to the bottom in the primary and will be left behind when you rack later on. I strain it because it will be less to deal with when I bottle.
2) have not rehydrated and fermentations have been great.
3) I think a kit is great for your first few batches just to get the process down.
Have fun!

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Old 03-26-2009, 11:48 PM   #6
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Ok well I'm fairly new at homebrewing so take my advice for what it's worth.

1. I personally have never had trub at the bottom of my kettle so can't say whether you should siphon it off or not. He might be refering to hop residue in which case you should try to leave it behind, or you could just use a hop sock like I do and not have to worry about it.

2. You are better off rehydrating the yeast before pitching it. The yeast needs to rehydrate before it can start doing it's job, and because the yeast rehydrates through osmosis it can be difficult in a high sugar enviroment like wort. If you just sprinkle the yeast on top the wort some of them will be able to adapt but most will likely go dormant and settle to the bottom.

You can make beer without rehydrating your yeast but it will take longer because you'll have less living yeast to do the job.

3. Kits would be the easiest way to get started, and I would do a few kits before trying a recipe from the internet or a book, well atleast until I felt confident about my beer brewing skills. Whether or not the kit is any good depends on the kit. My local homebrew store has some really good kits, but I can't say whether or not that's the norm.

Well thats my advice anyways but I'm still pretty new so if anyone on here disagrees with what I wrote then I would take their advice instead.

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Old 03-26-2009, 11:53 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daveooph131 View Post
Ok so I went and made my final purchases today at a local shop...I'm going to brew my first batch this weekend.

When talking to the owner there were some things he said that contradicted what I’ve read in books or on this form. Can you help me clarify?
1) After cooling the wort he told me the “trub” will be on the bottom of the kettle and to siphon the wort into the primary until you just about hit the nasty pile up of cold break/trub/bad protein or whatever. (Thoughts / Opinions?)
2) The shop owner was against rehydrating the yeast….Apparently it is unnecessary and not that good for the yeast. (Thoughts / Opinions?)
3) He told me to purchase a kit. The kit was a Bavarian Hefenfeizen that has everything in a box. Hops/malt/adjunct/ect….Are kits like this good? Next time I think I want to purchase all the hops ect… separately.

Thanks – brew on
1) If you mean is boil kettle waste called trub, then no, that is the fermenter waste. Yeah, you want to avoid siphoning up the hops and proteins. Whilpooling is the term of swirling the boiled wort to put the junk in teh center of the pot and then you siphon from the side of the pot. Siphoning thru a mesh bag will prevent picking up the nasty, and clogging the siphon. Putting hops in a fine mesh bag in the boil is another technique. There is a cold break at post fermentation when you chill to let proteins sediment out.

2) The yeast instructions say it is not necessary to rehydrate, but I take boiled wort from the kettle after it has boiled a while, and let it cool in a shallow dish, into which I dump the dry yeast, for getting it started. Rehydrating is technically using water, so I just consider it kick starting the yeast with what it will soon be eating anyway, as a lower sugar appetizer. A 'very short term starter'.

3) Kits are great for people that are timid about buying their own bulk supplies, or don't want to spend the time shopping for every little thing, or don't want to screw up and brew something in the wrong proportions or with the wrong ingredients (read bad recipe) and have sub-par brew. If you are comfortable in your knowledge of brewing ingredients and how to choose and use them, then skip on further kits. The best economy of brewing is to buy your own bulk hops in pounds, and buy bulk grains in sacks. This mandates that you have all these things stored around your pad until you use them, however. Different methods for different people, but I never even considered kits, myself.
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Old 03-27-2009, 12:18 AM   #8
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For 1) it's fine to leave it in the boiler. Some do, some don't. Me, I dump everything into the fermenter willy nilly and just rack off the top when I bottle.

2) You don't *have* to rehydrate your yeast, but it is recommended to do so to get the best yeast cell count. Just be sure to dump it into the wort within 15 minutes of hydration.

3) Some kits are good, some are mediocre. I really can't say, as I've never used any of them. For your first time they'll do just fine though.

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Old 03-27-2009, 12:29 AM   #9
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2) Follow the instructions on your packet of yeast. Some say to rehydrate and some don't. I'm surprised nobody has mentioned this.

Also, the guy may have confused rehydrating with proofing or making a starter.

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Old 03-27-2009, 12:33 AM   #10
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2) Follow the instructions on your packet of yeast. Some say to rehydrate and some don't. I'm surprised nobody has mentioned this.
No one mentioned it, because no one really does that. Those that rehydrate generally rehydrate any dry yeast, unless they just get lazy or forget. Those that don't, generally don't. Both will make beer, but some of us go that extra mile (or inch, in this case) for better beer.

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Also, the guy may have confused rehydrating with proofing or making a starter.
I would hope that if someone could mistake these two very different things, they wouldn't own a LHBS... at least not for very long. That's like telling someone a Belgian Wit and a Hefe Weizen are the same thing.
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