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Old 06-05-2012, 05:15 PM   #1
alexp
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Default Complete. Utter. Total. N00b.

Hi everyone! Finally bit the bullet yesterday and grabbed my first beginner kit. Its the Brewers Spring Draught. This is something I have been meaning to do for a couple of years now, so I am glad I finally have something going!!

I used tapwater, but let it sit overnight to leach out as much of the chlorine as possible, and now my wort is happily bubbling away in my primary. My question is if i wanted to filter this beer would I filter it racking to my secondary? Or would I filter it prior to bottling. Just curious, as I say, Im less than 24 hours old in this hobby!! I eventually want to get into doing 100 percent kit free brewing, with grain. Baby steps first though, so please bare with me!

Cheers

Alex!

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Old 06-05-2012, 05:20 PM   #2
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Congrats. But hate to burst your bubble. But you need co2 to force the beer through a filter. No real need to filter any way if its just a hobby. Imo.

If your talking about removing the hop junk then you could use some sort of sanitized grain/hop bag over the end of the racking cane. That will help the rest of the crap will fall out during ferm.

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Old 06-05-2012, 05:24 PM   #3
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If you are just filtering to get clearer beer, I would recommend to cold crash it in you fridge for 3-5 days before bottling. Also, I would let it sit in primary for 3 weeks and skipping secondary. If it isn't clear by then, you could cold crash longer and that should help.

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Old 06-05-2012, 05:26 PM   #4
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if you filter your beer, you might end up removing all the yeast... and then who will carbonate your beer in the bottles? (moot question if you're going to keg).

there is lots you can do get clear beer: cold crash, use finings like irish moss or whirlfloc, use gelatin, etc.

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Old 06-05-2012, 05:33 PM   #5
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By the way, if it is bubbling away in primary it is beer not wort. The minute you pitch your yeast, your wort becomes beer.
Congratulations on your first batch and on your new hobby which, if you are anything like most folks around here, will become a happy obsession!
Cheers and make sure to read the stickies.
Trust me on this!

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Old 06-05-2012, 05:44 PM   #6
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i think you will be surprised how clear you can get beer by just leaving it. gelatin will take out even more. cold crashing works well to

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Old 06-05-2012, 05:49 PM   #7
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Filtering is generally not necessary.

If the kit did not come with a whirlfloc tablet or some irish moss (refined and unrefined version of the same stuff) - go to a local homebrew supply and get some. Add 1 tablet or 1 teaspoon to the boil 15 minutes before you take it off the heat.

It will help assure that proteins in the beer that might otherwise make it cloudy will drop out into the sediment cake.

You can also add knox gelatine to the secondary to further flocculate the beer.

But really, beer is for drinking, not for watching TV through.

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Old 06-05-2012, 05:55 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcell View Post
if you filter your beer, you might end up removing all the yeast... and then who will carbonate your beer in the bottles? (moot question if you're going to keg).

there is lots you can do get clear beer: cold crash, use finings like irish moss or whirlfloc, use gelatin, etc.
Yeah. Filtering and bottling are pretty much mutually exclusive.

Also, you may want to reconsider using a secondary. It's not necessary for most beers and just gives you one more chance to oxidize or infect your beer and one more container to clean. You can just leave it where it is until it's at final gravity and you get a nice, tightly packed yeast cake on the bottom of your fermenter (search for "cold crash" if you want to speed it along). Then all you have to do is keep your racking cane out of the trub when you transfer to the bottling bucket. That way, you keep most of the yeast out of the bottle, but still have enough left in suspension to carbonate the beer.

Also, if you haven't already, read through John Palmer's How to Brew. It's free online (www.howtobrew.com ) and will answer many, many of your questions. Even some you didn't know you had.
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Old 06-05-2012, 06:02 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gr8shandini View Post
Yeah. Filtering and bottling are pretty much mutually exclusive.
I dunno, i bought a couple kegs from a guy who had decided that his preferred process is to put his beer in a keg, push it through a coarse filter into another keg with co2, then push it back into the first keg through a fine filter with co2, then force carb, then use a counterflow filler to fill bomber bottles.

Takes all kinds. Also takes at least 2 kegs and a tank of co2, and a blingmann beer gun.

He also painted the kegs - right over old labels and gummy leavings of labels - and those are the two kegs that have been giving me trouble.
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Old 06-05-2012, 06:09 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gr8shandini

Yeah. Filtering and bottling are pretty much mutually exclusive.

Also, you may want to reconsider using a secondary. It's not necessary for most beers and just gives you one more chance to oxidize or infect your beer and one more container to clean. You can just leave it where it is until it's at final gravity and you get a nice, tightly packed yeast cake on the bottom of your fermenter (search for "cold crash" if you want to speed it along). Then all you have to do is keep your racking cane out of the trub when you transfer to the bottling bucket. That way, you keep most of the yeast out of the bottle, but still have enough left in suspension to carbonate the beer.

Also, if you haven't already, read through John Palmer's How to Brew. It's free online (www.howtobrew.com ) and will answer many, many of your questions. Even some you didn't know you had.
Grab the actual book (3rd edition). Dont just read the online version. Many sections have been updated. Some old advice is no longer valid and several processes have changed.
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