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Old 09-22-2012, 06:32 PM   #11
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Something I've been wondering about...when you cold crash, do you bottle cold as well? Or do you let it warm up? Does it matter?

Cold crashing is something I have yet to do - because I don't really have the space to do it - but I may be able to clear some space in the chest freezer to give it a try
You can bottle it cold- no need to let it warm up. It works great- if people are having issues with come cloudy beer, it can really make a difference, and in the end there is lots less crud in the bottles.
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Old 09-23-2012, 01:19 AM   #12
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I have a nut brown in primary now. Today makes two weeks, but instead of bottling tomorrow, I going to leave it in primary another week. Next Saturday would make three weeks to the day after I brewed it. Could I:

1 cold crash for three days, starting on Thursday?
2 rack to my bottling bucket on Saturday
3* let my bottles condition at room temp (70*F) for two weeks, instead of returning to the fridge?


*I don't know if I'm going to bottle this whole 5 gallon batch or not. I'm thinking of just bottling a 12 pack and transfer the rest to one of my cornies and let it carb naturally at room temp until I get my keezer done. Suggestions?

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Old 09-23-2012, 05:51 PM   #13
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I have a nut brown in primary now. Today makes two weeks, but instead of bottling tomorrow, I going to leave it in primary another week. Next Saturday would make three weeks to the day after I brewed it. Could I:

1 cold crash for three days, starting on Thursday?
2 rack to my bottling bucket on Saturday
3* let my bottles condition at room temp (70*F) for two weeks, instead of returning to the fridge?


*I don't know if I'm going to bottle this whole 5 gallon batch or not. I'm thinking of just bottling a 12 pack and transfer the rest to one of my cornies and let it carb naturally at room temp until I get my keezer done. Suggestions?
You definitely want to leave the bottles out at room temp for at least a couple of weeks before putting them back in the fridge. If you put them in the fridge too soon, you'll end up with flat beer.
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Old 09-24-2012, 12:03 AM   #14
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You definitely want to leave the bottles out at room temp for at least a couple of weeks before putting them back in the fridge. If you put them in the fridge too soon, you'll end up with flat beer.

I'm a bit confused, do you cold crash before, or after you bottle? I was thinking of cold crashing the whole bucket (nothing bottled yet) before transferring to the bottling bucket, bottle the beer, then condition at room temp for 2 weeks minimum.
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Old 09-24-2012, 12:38 AM   #15
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I'm a bit confused, do you cold crash before, or after you bottle? I was thinking of cold crashing the whole bucket (nothing bottled yet) before transferring to the bottling bucket, bottle the beer, then condition at room temp for 2 weeks minimum.
When it's called 'cold crashing' they are referring to the entire fermentation vessel being reduced to a certain temperature.

When it happens in the bottle it's just getting your beer cold in the fridge for drinking!

You want to get the bucket/Carboy down to 40-50F however you can. I call 2-3 days good enough. So you are correct, get the whole batch cold before bottling it.
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Old 09-24-2012, 12:57 AM   #16
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Awesome. Thanks Jim for the help!

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Old 09-24-2012, 02:59 AM   #17
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Awesome. Thanks Jim for the help!
No problem. Enjoy!
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:34 AM   #18
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Thanks for the cold crashing clarification(s). I have one other (newbie) question to throw on the pile. It sounds like you cold crash for a few days at 37 degrees or so, bottle while it is still pretty chilly, and then let it condition at room temperature for two or three weeks.

When calculating how much priming sugar to put in, do you plug in the initial temperature, or the conditioning temperature? I have not cold-crashed before, but I had an over-carbonation problem on the last batch, so I don't want to repeat, or add another mistake.

Thanks for all the help I have already received through months of lurking.

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Old 09-27-2012, 01:53 AM   #19
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I am a newbie, but this is my understanding from a lot of newbie research and a pretty good understanding of physics:

You have to cold crash the entire batch to precipitate solids out of solution. This is because warm fluids can hold more of a secondary material in solution. (Think of sugar in water. When the water is cold, a pile of sugar sits in the bottom of the pan. Heat the water and more sugar dissolves. Cool the water and some of that sugar will come back out of solution. Same reason it rains when a cold front moves in.) The same thing happens with dissolved proteins and yeast particles. You cool your carboy or fermenter to remove them from solution, then bottle or keg, leaving the extra material behind and resulting in a clearer brew. If you "cold crashed" after bottling, the same materials would precipitate out, but would be reabsorbed into solution if the bottle warmed up.

I believe you could accomplish nearly the same thing if you got a bottle pretty cold and poured into a glass before warming, it just wouldn't be as drastic.

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Old 09-27-2012, 09:24 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by AllDay View Post
Thanks for the cold crashing clarification(s). I have one other (newbie) question to throw on the pile. It sounds like you cold crash for a few days at 37 degrees or so, bottle while it is still pretty chilly, and then let it condition at room temperature for two or three weeks.

When calculating how much priming sugar to put in, do you plug in the initial temperature, or the conditioning temperature? I have not cold-crashed before, but I had an over-carbonation problem on the last batch, so I don't want to repeat, or add another mistake.

Thanks for all the help I have already received through months of lurking.
When calculating priming sugar you need to have an idea of how much co2 there is still in solution that´s why calculator will ask you about temperature, you have to use the highest temperature of your beer before bottling, let´s say that you fermented at 69F and then cold crash, the temperature that you have to use it´s 69F then, if you let it sit warmer after fermentation an before cold crash, lets say at 75, then you have to use 75.
Hope this helps
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