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Old 12-22-2012, 05:50 PM   #61
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I usually have the most luck with 2-1/2 to 3 weeks at 70-72 F.



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Old 12-23-2012, 12:07 AM   #62
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Any body have a time frame as far as how much longer it will take to carbonate bottles of beer after cold crashing? For the first time I cold crashed a Saison and it has been in bottles for atleast 2 and half weeks and the carbonation is next to non existent.
It's going to depend a lot on the temperature they're at during carbonation.

I've just done it a couple of times recently but it's taken 3-4 weeks with the house at 67 deg (and colder at night). In the summer it should be significantly faster with my house temp up around 74 or so.

I've got my first lager carbing (with no yeast added at bottling) and I won't crack open one of those for 5 weeks, just to be sure. And it might take longer than that, I'm guessing. But I'll try one then.

I just opened an Irish Red that was at 3 weeks and it had just a tiny bit of carb to it. I'll try again at 4 weeks.


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Old 12-24-2012, 11:02 AM   #63
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At least 3 weeks is the standard answer around here, and in my experience it's a pretty good one. I've had some that are "carbonated" before that point, but the carbonation continued to improve until later. I've had some that took longer, even with only moderate alcohol content (<6%) and as near the same conditioning temperature as all the others---in a closed closet at 70°F. I've had a couple that took close to 6 weeks (and one that never carbonated well, but that's because I undershot the priming sugar quantity trying for a low-carbonation ESB).

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Old 03-24-2013, 10:29 PM   #64
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I keep hearing that a beer can be cold crashed and still have enough active yeast to carb up. It seems crashing requires a longer wait since there are less yeast cells? Some of the posts here speak of slow carb times, up to a month and such, but I have cold crashed a RIS and it's carbonation is not quite strong enough, and this is 36 days after bottling. Temp has been around 75, maybe as low as 70 overnight.


I understand a RIS takes more time to condition, mature etc.. but was wondering if cold crashing a stout is a waste of time. No need for clarity, for instance. I guess i'll forego the cold crash for a stout next time around and see if carb times are faster.

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Old 03-25-2013, 10:56 AM   #65
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It really depends on your expectations for carbonation time. I've never asked a beer to be carbonated in less than a month or so, even for 4-5% beers. More than 36 days for a strong beer like an RIS doesn't strike me as remarkable. Some have been crashed (for up to a month in a couple cases) and some have not, and I can't say I see a strong trend one way or the other.

Crashing a stout is less "necessary" than a lighter beer, although I'll note that one can often distinguish whether even a dark beer is bright or murky. It can also mean less sediment in the bottles, at least in principle.

Your experiment is worthwhile. It seems logical that crashing would lengthen carbonation times, but you never know until you do a direct comparison. It'd be ideal to do a split batch, one crashed and one not, but that's probably not practical.

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Old 03-27-2013, 06:30 PM   #66
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hey Zeg.. yes i did notice much (much!) less sediment in the bottles. the RIS is carbing good finally and the amount of yeast is just a whispy film.. unlike the 1/8" i have seen in other batches. so im saying that the clarity is better to me and my tastes than forgoing a cold crash. im thinking i'll cold crash every batch from now on. i have a wildflower honey red up next and just got ingredients for a quadruppel. the quad may NOT benefit from a crash? ill have to read and learn the best temps/practices for strong belgians. never brewed one.

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Old 03-28-2013, 02:14 AM   #67
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There are certainly styles that benefit from some residual yeast... but I'm not a fan of those in general, so I tend to cold crash or at least give a long conditioning period before bottling.

Speaking of crashing, I just tried the first of a doppelbock that lagered for about 10 weeks and has been in bottles for about 6. It was absolutely crystal clear (if you held it up to a light strong enough to penetrate the deep dark brown) and I dumped the whole bottle into the glass without a trace of sediment.

After 6 weeks, though, it was clearly not yet carbonated. Between the relatively high strength (7.5% or so, I think) and the lagering, I'm not surprised. There was some carbonation, certainly enough that it was drinkable, but I expect more. Going to give the rest some more time. I'm curious to see how this will compare to the bock I just bottled, which had a bit over 3 months lagering and only a slightly lower alcohol content.

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Old 10-03-2013, 05:05 AM   #68
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There are certainly styles that benefit from some residual yeast... but I'm not a fan of those in general, so I tend to cold crash or at least give a long conditioning period before bottling.

Speaking of crashing, I just tried the first of a doppelbock that lagered for about 10 weeks and has been in bottles for about 6. It was absolutely crystal clear (if you held it up to a light strong enough to penetrate the deep dark brown) and I dumped the whole bottle into the glass without a trace of sediment.

After 6 weeks, though, it was clearly not yet carbonated. Between the relatively high strength (7.5% or so, I think) and the lagering, I'm not surprised. There was some carbonation, certainly enough that it was drinkable, but I expect more. Going to give the rest some more time. I'm curious to see how this will compare to the bock I just bottled, which had a bit over 3 months lagering and only a slightly lower alcohol content.
Hey Zeg, just curious how the carbonation came out for your Doppelbock..
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Old 10-04-2013, 01:43 AM   #69
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Hey, good timing---I have been away for most of the last few months and just popped back the last week or so.

The carbonation on the DB came around. I don't know for sure how long it took, but it definitely got there. Still no discernible sediment. I'm pretty happy with it, except that it got to be a touch too hoppy. It got a 31 in the Indiana Brewer's Cup, which I'm happy with considering that it was mostly docked for being out of style. The brew day was nearly a disaster due to some still-unidentified problems (perhaps due to poor mixing of LME) leading to a seriously low OG reading, which I had to try to adapt to. To come out with essentially no true flaws was pretty good fortune.

My next beer was a maibock, using yeast harvested from the same batch as the DB yeast. That got forgotten in lagering for something like 5 months when I got busy. I was worried, but it carbonated even faster than the DB. By 4 weeks I think it had solid carbonation. Not much in the way of sediment there, either.

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Old 10-04-2013, 07:30 PM   #70
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Thanks for the update. Haven't tried cold crashing yet, but am intrigued to do it for a batch in the future.



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