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Old 12-07-2012, 07:23 PM   #51
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Phew...i'm exhausted just reading this....

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Old 12-07-2012, 07:23 PM   #52
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Phew...i'm exhausted just reading this....
I disagree
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:27 PM   #53
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:30 PM   #54
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I just did for the first time on a stout. The advantages (so I have heard) are smaller bubbles and better mouthfeel. Disadvantage is a longer time to prime.

I'm sure there are more of both, I just don't know them.

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Old 12-07-2012, 07:43 PM   #55
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I wondered the same thing. My thought is this: you need to cool quickly for multiple reasons.

1. The faster you cool, the less time you spend in a range where bacteria can take hold. As long as you don't actively cool, you may stay above a safe temp long enough to complete your steeping. A safe temp being like 168*f or so.

2. The faster you cool, the less time you spend creating some group of letters that I can't remember. MDS, maybe? All I know is that it is worse for a pilsner than other beers. There is a small window where the evaporation of this compound is reduced but it is still being created, so you want to get through this window quickly.

3. Cold break. This is probably the least critical as it affects only (as far as I have heard) the clarity of the beer. The faster you cool, the more proteins and other dissolved solids you can get out of solution.

I'm sure there are other reasons that I don't know and I am probably misspelling at least a little, so corrections are more than welcome.

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Old 12-07-2012, 08:02 PM   #56
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I think you are thinking of DMS, and that is driven off by boiling longer and more vigorously.

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Old 12-07-2012, 09:05 PM   #57
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That's a bit overkill.
Life got in the way, and I forgot about it. Its still a tasty beer but I wouldn't call it an ipa. I like to go 2 weeks on my ipas and then force Carb in a keg
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Old 12-07-2012, 10:05 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gcdowd
I think you are thinking of DMS, and that is driven off by boiling longer and more vigorously.
Thanks, I knew it was something like that. Maybe I misunderstood, but I thought it was created by the heat from the wort. As long as it was boiling, the DMS was being drive off as fast as it formed, but during cool down there is a period when it is still being formed but not driven off quite as fast. So if you stayed at a certain sub-boiling temp long enough, you could accumulate it.

Maybe my head is in my @$$...
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:33 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freisste View Post
Thanks, I knew it was something like that. Maybe I misunderstood, but I thought it was created by the heat from the wort. As long as it was boiling, the DMS was being drive off as fast as it formed, but during cool down there is a period when it is still being formed but not driven off quite as fast. So if you stayed at a certain sub-boiling temp long enough, you could accumulate it.

Maybe my head is in my @$$...
I understand the DMS does not form when the wort is below 140F. Its a reason some people like to use an immersion chiller prior using a counterflow device. I'm hoping for a convoluted chiller for Christmas but I think I'll still use my immersion chiller to get to 140. The immersion chiller is pretty efficient at getting down to that temp so I'm thinking the combo is the best way to go.
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Old 12-22-2012, 12:12 PM   #60
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Any body have a time frame as far as how much longer it will take to carbonate bottles of beer after cold crashing? For the first time I cold crashed a Saison and it has been in bottles for atleast 2 and half weeks and the carbonation is next to non existent.

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