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Old 08-06-2009, 10:22 PM   #1
ChuckCollins
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Default Cold Crashing

What does this do and how does it help?



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Old 08-06-2009, 10:48 PM   #2
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It will clear the beer much faster. It may help meld flavors too, I'm still not sure but I have read that. In any case getting the yeast out will make the beer taste cleaner.



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Old 08-06-2009, 11:22 PM   #3
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Especially when kegging, crash cooling is an excellent tool. When you put your carboy/bucket in a fridge for several days the beer will clear very quickly. First pour from the tap is clear as commercial brew..... You can bottle after crash cooling.....it just takes a couple more weeks to carb properly.

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Old 08-07-2009, 01:02 AM   #4
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Even after bottling it could be called cold conditioning. It does the same thing. It also can solidify the sediment to the bottom of the bottle. I carb (bottle condition) for one week and cold condition for one week. With my lagers I'll add some yeast. They still have less sediment and carb within a week.

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Old 08-07-2009, 01:23 AM   #5
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Before I never cold crashed, but relied on the cold conditioning to clarify the beer. My beer was always pretty hazy.

Nowadays, I add gelatin a few days before cold crashing, bottle, carbonate for a couple of weeks and then cold condition for a few days at the end of bottle conditioning. My beer is much prettier now as a result.

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Old 08-07-2009, 11:42 AM   #6
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+Hammy71,
Usually I let the beer fully ferment out. Five days to 14 days depending on the beer or how lazy I am. Then I rack to secondary and let it continue to condition for say a week. Then I put that carboy in my keggerator at around 36F for around a week.
When I rack into a keg, it is completely cleared and tasting great. If I'm in a hurry I can force carb it and serve in a few hours.
I have been doing it so long and so happy with the results I really can't see doing it any other way.

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Old 08-07-2009, 11:53 AM   #7
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It's something that isn't required by any means but if you have the capability to cold crash the primary for a day or two before racking you should. This leaves a lot more yeast in the primary, which is good if you are planning to repitch from that, and it also makes for a nice clean beer with less sediment in the keg.

As I said, not necessary but if you have the space it takes pretty much no effort, so why not.

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Old 08-07-2009, 12:05 PM   #8
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Tonedef131 -
And I thought I was working on expanding my pipeline and homebrew selection. I lost my concentration half a dozen times reading that list.
Prost.

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Old 08-07-2009, 01:40 PM   #9
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If you cold crash a primary, does it have any effect on racking a new batch of wort on that cold-crashed yeast cake? I guess my question is: if you cold crash, the yeast go dormant, right? Can you still reuse that cake for another brew?

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Old 08-07-2009, 02:28 PM   #10
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Yes, you can still use that yeast. You don't kill it. I wouldn't go racking 90F wort on top of 35F slurry though. Let the slurry warm up to room temp while you're brewing the next batch.



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