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Old 12-29-2012, 06:53 AM   #11
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The 3 week primary plan is still a good one, even if you don't "see" fermentation happening. As you will read so many time on this site, airlock activity is NOT an indicator that the beer is/is not fermenting. Always trust your hydrometer, especially with your FG. If you want more coffee flavor after you check FG a few weeks from now you could always add a few of those starbucks via instant coffee deals with your priming sugar. I'm sure it will come out great! The coffee doesn't always come through pre-fermentation because of all the sugar in there. Its easier to pick out post fermentation.

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Old 01-04-2013, 06:06 PM   #12
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So, my beer has been fermenting for 8 days now and is still incredibly cloudy. I was thinking I didn't pitch enough yeast. I figured I needed to use 10.5 g. I just did a calculator online and it suggested 12g.

How much of an issue could this be? Should I just repitch more yeast?

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Old 01-04-2013, 06:17 PM   #13
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Cloudyness has little to do with yeast.

You pitched enough. You saw the signs of initial fermentation (bubbling in the airlock). Fact is, your beer is probably nearing it's FG. At this point, the yeast are just cleaning up after themselves, and improving overall flavor for you.

If you're really worried, I'd take a hydrometer reading. Generally, I don't take any before the 12 day mark . . . but 8 days won't kill you. Just keep it sanitized

To eliminate the cloudyness, when you're ready to bottle, cold crash the beer for a day. This means to put it in a place where the temperature is in the mid 30's or so (degrees F). You're in Wisconsin, this shouldn't be hard to find Cold crashing will help settle out yeast and proteins that cause cloudyness. Don't do it for more than about 24 hours, though, else you might lose too much yeast prior to bottling.

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Old 01-04-2013, 07:58 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masterfool101 View Post
Cloudyness has little to do with yeast.

You pitched enough. You saw the signs of initial fermentation (bubbling in the airlock). Fact is, your beer is probably nearing it's FG. At this point, the yeast are just cleaning up after themselves, and improving overall flavor for you.

If you're really worried, I'd take a hydrometer reading. Generally, I don't take any before the 12 day mark . . . but 8 days won't kill you. Just keep it sanitized

To eliminate the cloudyness, when you're ready to bottle, cold crash the beer for a day. This means to put it in a place where the temperature is in the mid 30's or so (degrees F). You're in Wisconsin, this shouldn't be hard to find Cold crashing will help settle out yeast and proteins that cause cloudyness. Don't do it for more than about 24 hours, though, else you might lose too much yeast prior to bottling.
Hey thanks for the reply. I'll research up on cold crash and go that route more than likely. What are your thoughts on a secondary for 2 weeks?

The main problem with WI right now is finding a place warm enough to cold crash my beer.
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Old 01-04-2013, 09:17 PM   #15
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The general consensus on this forum is that Secondary Fermentation is not necessary. It's better to just leave it in the primary for the time you would have put it in a secondary. The reasoning behind this is that when you transfer the beer, you've got a better chance of getting an infection and/or oxidizing the beer.

That being said, transfering to a secondary is a good way to help clear the beer. If you're worried about clarity, you might want to do this . . . just be sure that (a) You are extremely careful about sanitation and (b) you transfer carefully, making sure the beer doesn't splash.

As for somewhere WARM enough . . . that's funny. if there's snow outside, consider a tub of water (one of those beverage tubs with rope handles from Walmart works great) filled with a snow/water mixture. It will cool the beer down quickly, but also not get it cold enough to freeze. Fill the tub when you go to bed. Add more snow in the morning, if necessary.

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