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Old 09-26-2012, 08:23 PM   #1
ozziej
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Default Cidery taste

I've brewed a few recipes (a mixture of both extract and partial grain recipes) and in several I've discovered a somewhat cidery taste present- not sure what is causing this, as I've been pretty particular about sanitation, clarification, etc.. And it's not in consecutive batches (present in an amber ale, not present in a stout, not present in wit beer, but present in Belgian dubble)....

Anyone have any ideas what may be the cause of this and what I can do to eliminate it in my next go?

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Old 09-26-2012, 08:33 PM   #2
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what sugar are you using to carb your beers?

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Old 09-26-2012, 08:33 PM   #3
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Sounds like it could be green beer. How long did it persist? Green beer or fresh beer taste should age out in a week or two.

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Old 09-26-2012, 08:39 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Sometimes a cidery flavor can come from a too-warm fermentation temperature also.
Right. If the temp of the fermenting liquid gets into the 70s, then acetaldehyde production skyrockets. Acetaldehyde is what produces those green-apple like flavors.

Chris White (White Labs) in his Yeast book did an experiment with a pair of 5 gallon batches, one fermented at 68 and another at 75. I don't remember the exact numbers off the top of my head, but the 68 degree batch produced something like 7-9 ppm of acetaldehyde (with an 8-10 ppm taste threshhold), while the 75 degree batch produced something like 150 ppm.

Try cooler fermentations and see if that doesn't solve the issue.
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Old 09-26-2012, 08:40 PM   #6
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I have a similar problem with my first batch. It tastes like Champagne. It's supposed to be an IPA, but it doesn't even RESEMBLE an IPA, let alone ale of any kind. There isn't even the slightest hop profile. It's not even bitter, despite 1.5oz. of bittering hops used in the boil. Any ideas? Fermentation was quite high (think 86 at it's peak).

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Old 09-26-2012, 08:45 PM   #7
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Yea, high fermentation temps, OR acetobacter (FRUIT FLIES!). Happened to me with my second batch, an ESB. It's not right, but drinkable. I don't think it ever goes away.

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Old 09-26-2012, 08:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
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Fermentation was quite high (think 86 at it's peak).
That would do it. You can get fusel alcohols ("hot" alcohol flavor), solvently flavors, and fruity flavors. It will totally ruin the taste of the beer.
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Old 09-26-2012, 08:55 PM   #9
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It will totally ruin the taste of the beer.
Will the "off" flavors ever even out? We bottled 3 weeks ago, so the beer is only 6 weeks old.
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Old 09-26-2012, 09:06 PM   #10
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Thanks for the feedback- didn't realize the impacts of fermentation temps.... That's one area that I haven't really focussed on...


No other way to remove from existing beer? Aeration after opening?

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