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Old 02-09-2013, 08:10 PM   #1
jimmarshall
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Default Chilling wort outside?

Can I speed up the chilling process by putting my wort out on the deck? Approx. 21 degrees here.

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Old 02-09-2013, 08:20 PM   #2
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Last Sunday was -18C with a stiff wind so I put the stainless steel pot outside with 20 liters of wort rather than using the chiller. Even with occasional stirring it took hours to cool. I was really surprise, I'm thinking of using a similar system to heat the house.

On the up side contamination was minimized during the cooling.

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Old 02-09-2013, 08:24 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwwbrennan
Last Sunday was -18C with a stiff wind so I put the stainless steel pot outside with 20 liters of wort rather than using the chiller. Even with occasional stirring it took hours to cool. I was really surprise, I'm thinking of using a similar system to heat the house.

On the up side contamination was minimized during the cooling.
I don't have a chiller, just doing my first batch. Was worried putting it on the deck would be a bad thing.
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Old 02-09-2013, 08:29 PM   #4
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I tried to put my kettle in the snow on my terrace. Very bad idea, because melted snow created an ice around, which worked as an isolation. It took 4 hours to cool 5 gal batch. From what I read, the water is the best conductor, much better than air.

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Old 02-09-2013, 08:29 PM   #5
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It will take a long time using convection (i.e. the breeze/wind) even at 20 degrees. I know from experience.

Conduction is the best way. If you have a large rubbermaid container you could fill that with water and stick it outside to cool to freezing temps. Then place you boil pot in the cold water. Even then to pot will transfer a lot of heat to the rubbermaid water. You would probably need to have some ice on hand to dump in the rubbermaid when that water starts to get warm.

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Old 02-09-2013, 08:34 PM   #6
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In below freezing temperatures you can cool quickly outside, but not occasional stirring. I have an aluminum strainer that I use to cool wort. And spray the water hose on the sides of it if you can. Take the aluminum strainer, largest one you can find to still fit in the kettle, turn the handle up 45 degrees and stir up and down. If you can set the kettle in soft snow, even better. 10-20 minutes and your wort will be cooled to 80 degrees from a boil. Spray with water hose first for initial cooling of the metal. Constant up and down stirring with the strainer, the ones with fairly large round holes on the bottom. Careful not to spill the beer and move it around in the snow(if you can) as it melts around the kettle. And your wort will be plenty oxygenated when you pitch the yeast.

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Old 02-09-2013, 08:53 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigRedHopHead
It will take a long time using convection (i.e. the breeze/wind) even at 20 degrees. I know from experience.

Conduction is the best way. If you have a large rubbermaid container you could fill that with water and stick it outside to cool to freezing temps. Then place you boil pot in the cold water. Even then to pot will transfer a lot of heat to the rubbermaid water. You would probably need to have some ice on hand to dump in the rubbermaid when that water starts to get warm.
I put my hose in the rubbermaid on my deck and with the water constantly running I can cool 5 gallons in 20-30 mins.
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Old 02-09-2013, 09:15 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher21 View Post
I put my hose in the rubbermaid on my deck and with the water constantly running I can cool 5 gallons in 20-30 mins.
I 1/2 fill the rubbermaid with snow, then fill it with water, then pump it through my chiller, as the snow melts just shovel more into the tub. If there is no snow, might as well do it inside where its warm and the water for the chiller gets iced.
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Old 02-09-2013, 10:09 PM   #9
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I've always had luck with just a traditional ice bath. I have a large rubbermaid tub that i have been filling with ice water always works fine. Im trying to get a wort chiller though that would be best.

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Old 02-09-2013, 10:56 PM   #10
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Use the cold air outside to freeze a bunch of water to use the next day in an icewater bath. You need the water to pull the heat away since cold air is pretty horrible at cooling wort down fast.

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