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Old 09-26-2011, 03:02 PM   #1
Tam004
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Okay, so today I tasted the fruits of my labor, my first all grain batch. It's an Abby Dubbel, brewed 6 weeks ago. It spent 2 weeks in the primary, 2 weeks in the secondary and 2 weeks in the bottle. It was a 1 gallon batch and it was bottled with 24 grams of corn sugar which I had boiled in a small amount of water for 2 minutes and cooled to room temp before adding to the beer before bottling.

It tasted okay but there is very little carbonation after 2 weeks. Should I worry or will it continue to carbonate with time?

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Old 09-26-2011, 03:04 PM   #2
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Set them in a warmer place. +70F give it more time.

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Old 09-26-2011, 03:08 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Tam004 View Post

It tasted okay but there is very little carbonation after 2 weeks. Should I worry or will it continue to carbonate with time?

This makes sense to me why they're not carbed yet.

The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.


Temp and gravity are the two factors that contribute to the time it takes to carb beer. But if a beer's not ready yet, or seems low carbed, and you added the right amount of sugar to it, then it's not stalled, it's just not time yet.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

If a beer isn't carbed by "x number of weeks" you just have to give them more time. If you added your sugar, then the beer will carb up eventually, it's really a foolproof process. All beers will carb up eventually. A lot of new brewers think they have to "troubleshoot" a bottling issue, when there really is none, the beer knows how to carb itself. In fact if you run beersmiths carbing calculator, some lower grav beers don't even require additional sugar to reach their minimum level of carbonation. Just time.

ANd since your in a 65 degree place, you have to figure another extra week. So I wouldn't bother touching them for 2 more weeks.
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Old 09-26-2011, 03:09 PM   #4
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Additionally I had a strong ale that took 6 months to carb. It's not too much of a surprise. The higher the grav the longer it takes, and your dubbel is a BIIIIG beer.

Lazy Llama came up with a handy dandy chart to determine how long something takes in brewing, whether it's fermentation, carbonation, bottle conditioning....

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Old 09-26-2011, 03:27 PM   #5
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As a new brewer, it seems like I have not yet learned about patience:-). So I will try to sit tight and try another in 3 or 4 weeks. Is this a good plan or should I wait even longer?

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Old 09-26-2011, 04:00 PM   #6
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Try in in 3-4 weeks. But again, don't stress if it's not ready.

In the future consider adding fresh yeast at bottling time, for big beers or beers that bulk aged for a long time, it's almost a necessity.

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Old 09-26-2011, 04:03 PM   #7
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You'll have some carbonation by then, but it may get even better with age. I have a Tripel that took 3-4 months to strongly carbonate. Taste continues to get more refined and additional flavors are developing (I'm at 6 months now).

My advice is to try one or two as you move on, but save the bulk of the batch for consumption at 3-9 months. To tide you over, get another batch started that takes minimal time for peak flavor (like a wheat or mild/cream ale).

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Old 09-26-2011, 04:13 PM   #8
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Those of us who started out wine making find it easier to have patience for beer brewing but even then, I find it hard not to want to get into a batch of beer early even knowing it will be better if I can just wait. LOL

I have 15 gallons of beer in kegs that I brewed in April/May that I know are ready but I don't have a kegerator set up yet. Thinking of just setting the keg in my Igloo cooler and dumping in ice and hooking up the thumb tap and CO2.

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Old 09-26-2011, 05:25 PM   #9
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Gosh yes, grab a bag of ice, hook up a picnic tap, and invite all your friends!

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Old 09-26-2011, 06:52 PM   #10
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[QUOTE="

In the future consider adding fresh yeast at bottling time, for big beers or beers that bulk aged for a long time, it's almost a necessity.[/QUOTE]

How much yeast would I need to add for a one gallon batch?

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