Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > carbonation issues
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-12-2009, 04:38 PM   #1
jagdeuce
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 10
Default carbonation issues

I am fairly new to homebrewing but have had some good luck with most of my beers so far. The first 3 batches were well carbonated with great head retention.

My problem is that the last 3 are lacking in both the carbonation and retention.

In looking through my log and brainstorming, the only thing I changed is I started using whirlfloc tablets. Could this have anything to do with my carbonation problems.

If yes would Irish Moss have the same affect?

Also I have two more batches in carboys...is there anything I should do when I bottle those???

Thanks!!

__________________
jagdeuce is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-12-2009, 04:51 PM   #2
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2774 Times on 1659 Posts
Likes Given: 3486

Default

How long and at what temp are you storing them to carb? If it's under three weeks minimum and below 70 degrees (for NORMAL grav beers), when you are testing them, then there is nothing wrong but impatience...Storage temp, and gravity are the two most important important factors in carbing and conditioning...

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

ALL beers will reach their level of carbonation eventually. In fact, it's possible (and proven by running the numbers in beersmith) to NOT add priming sugar and get minimal carbonation of a few volumes in time (in old brewing british brewing books they didn't add sugar to some ordinary bitters, and milds and relied on time and temp to do the work naturally.)

More info can be found here....Revvy's Blog, Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. There's even a video.

__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-12-2009, 04:59 PM   #3
jagdeuce
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 10
Default

Sorry I didn't give all of the info....

The batches range in age from 3 weeks to 10 weeks and have been in my basement which ranges in temp from 66 to 72 degrees.

There is some carbonation but it is very minimal and with the older 2 batches has not changed as they have gotten older.

__________________
jagdeuce is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-12-2009, 06:07 PM   #4
hoppheadIPA
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Navarre, Florida
Posts: 192
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Patience young grasshopper. They WILL carb up!!!

__________________
hoppheadIPA is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-12-2009, 06:44 PM   #5
McGarnigle
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NYS
Posts: 1,821
Liked 43 Times on 38 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

I dunno. If these are regular sized beers, yo shouldn't have to wait 10 weeks.

How much priming sugar do you add? What are your expectations regarding fizz? Bud, Miller, et. al. tend to be on the high side, so your homebrew may never reach those levels. Whirlfloc and Irish Moss aren't going to effect the level of carbonation. You'd have to actually filter your beer (or leave it in secondary for a looooong time) to have problems due to insufficient yeast.

Head retention brings in other factors, such as style of the beer, etc.

__________________
McGarnigle is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-12-2009, 07:13 PM   #6
kevmoron
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 268
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

I disagree with the notion that all beers will eventually carb. If too much time elapses between brewing and bottling, particularly if you are making a very high alcohol beer, the yeast could possibly be dead by the time you bottle. If your yeast is dead, your yeast is dead, and it will not carb even after 6 months. I had left a Belgian Dark Strong Ale in primary for three weeks, and secondary for another five, and in a 10% alcohol environment, the yeast were dead by the time I bottled. Nine months later, it still had not carbed. In that situation, you would need to open each bottle and aliquot a small amount of fresh yeast to get it done.

__________________
kevmoron is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-13-2009, 02:42 AM   #7
jagdeuce
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 10
Default

Ok the beers were primed with 4 oz. of corn sugar into what ended up being 4.5 gallons of beer come time of bottling.

I am just looking for decent carbonation like that I get from the microbrews I am used to drinking.

Don't get me wrong, I am enjoying my beers, just looking to improve.

The 3 beers in question were an altbeir, nut brown ale, and an English Pale Ale....I have an IPA in the bottle but have not checked those yet...just shy of 2 weeks on those, will be trying one tomorrow.

__________________
jagdeuce is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-13-2009, 02:53 AM   #8
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 62,769
Liked 4909 Times on 3560 Posts
Likes Given: 988

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jagdeuce View Post
Ok the beers were primed with 4 oz. of corn sugar into what ended up being 4.5 gallons of beer come time of bottling.

I am just looking for decent carbonation like that I get from the microbrews I am used to drinking.

Don't get me wrong, I am enjoying my beers, just looking to improve.

The 3 beers in question were an altbeir, nut brown ale, and an English Pale Ale....I have an IPA in the bottle but have not checked those yet...just shy of 2 weeks on those, will be trying one tomorrow.
4 ounces of corn sugar is more than adequate for 4.5 gallons of beer. Do you have them warm enough?
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Find me on facebook: Lorena Evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Carbonation issues... BrewProject Extract Brewing 18 07-16-2009 04:23 AM
Carbonation issues? MBM30075 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 05-01-2009 06:25 PM
Carbonation issues Bruiz54 Bottling/Kegging 6 03-03-2008 01:19 PM
Carbonation issues elsmithfree Bottling/Kegging 2 11-09-2006 06:23 PM
Carbonation issues Radarbrew Bottling/Kegging 5 06-16-2006 01:29 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS