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Old 02-04-2009, 01:14 AM   #1
dsoto75
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Default can I use a turkey fryer??

I have read a few posts in the forums about people asking opinions about turkey fryers for I guess boiling the wart. Can you use a turkey fryer? I'm mean I guess I don't see why not, and I'm thinking that would actually be a cool idea. If so, any suggestions as to brands?

I got about 200 bucks burning a hole in my pocket, and would not mind spending it on my beer brewing habit, before my wife finds it for more shoes or handbags

thanks for the advice

-daddy dave

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Old 02-04-2009, 01:16 AM   #2
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Yes!

Scroll down to the similar threads below and you will see some info...And if that's not enough, if you search you will find plenty more threads....

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Old 02-04-2009, 01:18 AM   #3
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Only if you want your beer to taste like fried turkey!


Just kidding. TONS of people use them. I started on a Eastman Outdoors model back when we got a great deal on them http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/fant...ng-wort-65124/

That is now the burner for my HLT and I have a bayou classic now for my kettle NORTHERN BREWER: Burners which is great. Highly recommend the bayou.

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Old 02-04-2009, 01:20 AM   #4
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Sure.. turkey fryers are fine. However, depending on where you are with your brewing endeavors, you may save some money in the long run by starting bigger...

Most of those frying pots are about 5 or maybe 6 gallons... which makes a full 5 gallon All Grain (AG) batch impossible. On eBay you can always find 10-15 gallon pots for under a hundred bucks or so.... with a 10 gallon pot you can do 6 gallon batches easily. You can also do an easy 5 gallon AG batch.

Burners are tricky... some are damned expensive for no apparent reason. Look for a bunch of BTU's in whatever you buy. Many of the turkey fryer burners are pretty small. You should be able to get a much nicer burner than that included in most of the kits.. and you can probably get it for $75 or less... possibly quite a bit less...

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Old 02-04-2009, 01:51 AM   #5
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I bought a turkey fryer because I have a electric stove and it takes forever to get water boiling. I priced out stainless steel pots and found I could get the pot and fryer for the same price. For me it was a no brainer and I did my first batch in it 2 weeks ago and bottled it tonight.

Oh, and it came with a nice thermometer.

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Old 02-04-2009, 02:01 AM   #6
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Northern Brewer has a banjo burner with stand (210K BTU's) for $80. Most turkey fryers are around 50-60K BTU's... and I know you can get a banjo burner for at least twenty bucks less if you scour the web looking for it...

And I can say from experience that the 60K BTU models will not bring 10 gallons to a real rolling boil... at least not in a reasonable amount of time under normal conditions... but you can always turn down the bigger burner to save gas.

So I say get the big burner for $50-80 and a *big* kettle and you'll be set. And you can bring it in well under your $200 limit. It will ease your transition to all grain and it will allow you to do 10 gallon batches in case you want to, oh say, supply your friend's summer barbecue without appreciably eating into your basement beer reserves... I definitely regret not starting off with a bigger burner when I started. That and a good chiller are the only two things that will really save you time on a brew day. Sure, we all love to be out there all day... but sometimes you have time constraints and besides these two piece of equipment, there's just not much more time to be saved on a brew day... so it's definitely nice to have...

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Old 02-04-2009, 02:04 AM   #7
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I love you guys.......

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Old 02-04-2009, 02:07 AM   #8
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why use a turkey fryer though...are you gonna use it for that purpose? If not, i suggest going to walmart and getting a stainless steel pot for $50

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Old 02-04-2009, 02:09 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACo View Post
why use a turkey fryer though...are you gonna use it for that purpose? If not, i suggest going to walmart and getting a stainless steel pot for $50
I think most of us are talking about the burner, not the pot.
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Old 02-04-2009, 02:14 AM   #10
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Not a problem at all... and again.. thinking ahead... If you think you might get a hankering to do a 10 gallon batch or two, then get the 15 gallon kettle so that 10 gallon batches are easy. My advice is just to look at it economically. Get the biggest darned pot you can get (and a burner to bring it to a boil). You'll never regret it...

Heck, even doing 5 gallon batches in a 15 gallon pot is awesome because you never really have to worry about boil overs. And really, it's a one time purchase. Sure, someday you might decide to upgrade to a 15.5 gallon system (to fill an actual keg). Even if you do, that 15 gallon pot will be just fine for heating strike water. And there are pros who use 15 gallon systems when they start... so that one pot should last you your entire lifetime...

A 5 gallon pot? You'll outgrow it when you go AG. A 6 gallon pot will work, but you'll find it to be a little small. Still, a 6 gallon turkey fryer might be a great budget purchase.

A 7.5 gallon pot? Will work for a 5 gallon AG batch, but you'll outgrow it when you want to make a double batch. And at this point you've already outgrown turkey fryers, so you're either looking at either a keggle (7.5 gallon pony keg or else a 15.5 full size keggle converted for brewing) or else restaurant-type stock pots. It's a very convenient size.... but on the other hand, you've now reached the point that unless you've gotten a really good deal, it won't cost much more to go a bit bigger...

A 10 gallon pot? What's the point? It's a kind of a silly size to get... You won't be able to do an All Grain double batch and you'll HATE doing a double batch without extra space for evaporation, let alone boil overs... It's really not much better than the 7.5 gallon size except that you can theoretically do a 10 gallon batch.

A 12.5 gallon pot? Is good enough for a 10 gallon extract batch, but not nearly enough for an All Grain double batch. And if you're brewing for friends at that point, the cost difference between extract and all grain is not insignificant! Blowing a hundred bucks on extract? Forget about it! (IMHO).

A 15 gallon pot? That'll do a 10 gallon batch, even All Grain, with minimal worries about boil overs and it can even heat enough water for a 15 or 20 gallon batch, which makes it useful for something even if/when your batches take on extreme proportions... and by that time, I guarantee that a 5, 7.5, or even 10 gallon pot will have been sent to the trash heap, or passed along to another brewer... The 15 gallon pot can be used in a limited capacity as you start a company and brew your own beer for a little while and it's also the ideal size for an all grain double batch... So in my mind, the 15 gallon kettle is the smallest size that will never need to be upgraded by 99.999% of the homebrewers out there. It's the size I would recommend to anyone who is serious about learning to brew and sharing their beer.

A 20 gallon pot? If you're routinely making double batches (10 gallons) of All Grain beer, this is definitely the size to get (if not a little larger). It will have the space to reduce the risk of boil overs while holding 15-17 gallons of boiling wort. Just try that with a 15 gallon kettle!

And yes... you can ALWAYS go bigger...

But with all that said... there's nothing wrong with starting with a 5 gallon pot and a turkey fryer. Maybe you'll be happy to never go all-grain. Maybe you won't ever want or need the extra capacity. But I've laid out the limitations of each size so you can make the right choice for you. I think it's perfectly reasonable to start out with a pot between 6 and 7.5 gallons and it will take you through All Grain brewing 5 gallon batches just fine. Anything beyond that is a luxury. Unfortunately though, by the time you've reached 6 gallons, you're already beyond the size of most turkey fryer kits, so you're then looking at restaurant supply stores (or "illegally made" keggles)... and at that point, the cost of going a little larger... to ten or fifteen gallons... is not so significant.

So my advice? get a 5 gallon turkey fryer if money is tight and you'll make some damn fine beer. If you've got a little flexibility in your bank account, the 7.5 gallon kettle is a LOT nicer for just a little more money... and if you're getting the 7.5 and space is not an issue, then there's a lot to be said for just getting the 15 gallon one to start with because you will never outgrow it.

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Last edited by Sir Humpsalot; 02-04-2009 at 03:34 AM.
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