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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Can electrolytic acid etching my brew kettle destroy its layer in anyways?
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Old 03-03-2014, 05:24 PM   #1
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Default Can electrolytic acid etching my brew kettle destroy its layer in anyways?

I have just read this post: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/how-...9/#post5955330

I am seriously considering doing this...but I'd like to know if it is totally safe to do this to a brew kettle? Wont it destroy the protective layer of stainless steel?

Obviously.....everyone will say "no"...because this is surely something many of you guys do...but can I do anything during the process that can be damaging?

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Old 03-03-2014, 06:01 PM   #2
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You are referring to Passivation. It will occur naturally over time when exposed to air. If you etch your boil kettle, I would recommended you let it sit for 2 weeks in normal atmospheric air, this allows the oxide to form naturally on the exposed clean surface to rebuild the passive oxygen layer that stainless steel is known for it's corrosion resistant properties.

Granted, some acid mixtures will have an oxidizing agents which will speed up this process.

Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passiva...28chemistry%29

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Old 03-04-2014, 09:06 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IXVolt View Post
You are referring to Passivation. It will occur naturally over time when exposed to air. If you etch your boil kettle, I would recommended you let it sit for 2 weeks in normal atmospheric air, this allows the oxide to form naturally on the exposed clean surface to rebuild the passive oxygen layer that stainless steel is known for it's corrosion resistant properties.

Granted, some acid mixtures will have an oxidizing agents which will speed up this process.

Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passiva...28chemistry%29

Thanks for the reply.
So....there is a protective oxide layer on stainless steel that naturally builds up?
Shall I always keep my pot without the lid, being exposed to air while in storage?
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Old 03-04-2014, 05:28 PM   #4
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Yes, there is always a protective oxide layer.

But once it's formed, it takes something major to remove it. You can store your pot with lid on as usual.

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