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Old 03-26-2009, 08:31 PM   #1
yeasty
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Default bottling the right way with no off flavors

i have noticed that the bottling tool i use (dont know what it is called), the thing with the spring valve on the bottom that you hook to your bottling bucket spigot, creates a fair amount of bubbling and turbulence when i use it. i have been wondering if this is why some of my beers from each batch seem to have an off flavor. i wont even try to describe it, but its nasty. i always think i can tolerate it and halfway though the beer i dump it. i am assuming when you bottle you want NO BUBBLING when it transfers to the bottle. is there a better tool ? should i use my auto siphon and a clamp...this would be a pain in the arse ?

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Old 03-26-2009, 08:36 PM   #2
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If you are using a bottling wand connected to your spigot and you fear it is causing the problem. You could always just run a small piece of tubing from the spigot and use the spigot to control the filling instead of the spring loaded bottling wand.

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Old 03-26-2009, 08:41 PM   #3
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can you maybe try to describe the flavor a bit for us. Is it anything like wet carboard? it is also possible that a few bottles end up with a bit of infection in them.

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Old 03-26-2009, 09:07 PM   #4
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i will try to describe it but i know it wont help. its kind of a bitter bite that leaves a mouth feel on the tongue and lips. it persists and even builds as you drink it....one batch that i accidentally aerated when transferring to the bottling bucket had this flavor so bad i couldnt drink any of them (i did save some). but i also noticed it in an english pale ale when i shook a six pack up real good to try to get it to carb up a little quicker (i know not a thing that should be done). it is possible a few bottle did not get cleaned well enough. i have been using the sanitze feature on my dishwasher but there is always a small amount of moisture left in the bottles after that process. i have been fearful of letting them dry because i thought the time that would take would be worse ? for lack of a better description i would call it a mixture of CHEAP NASTY root beer and licorice....

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Old 03-26-2009, 09:36 PM   #5
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I don't trust my dishwasher sanitization setting. if you read up on killing bacteria using high temperatures - you will find that bacteria die at different temps depending on what the bacteria strain is. they begin to die @ 100F - 140F and take up to an hour at these temperatures to fully die. More hearty strains will live up to boiling temperatures for longer periods of time.
My dishwasher is also a POS, but I would rather clean thoughroughly then sanitize using starsan or equivalent.
there are lots of threads here that discuss this point: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/clea...tation-109900/

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Old 03-26-2009, 09:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yeasty View Post
for lack of a better description i would call it a mixture of CHEAP NASTY root beer and licorice....
I've had off flavors that match this description well in a few of my brews. It spans between yeast strains, fermentors, and extract/all grain. It's weird, but I do understand your 'bitter' description. It's not a hop bitterness but it most definitely does have a bitter bite to it. One batch was a pale ale that was a bit more on the bitter side to begin with and it's almost undrinkable. I think it might be related to fermenting temps. The past few brews I've made, I've paid strong attention to the ferm temps (and kept them low) and they've all not had this flavor. Still haven't decided if this is a coincidence or not. I should try a split batch and ferment one at 60 and one at 70 and report what I notice. I might actually do that this weekend, as I have a lot of extract lying around and nothing to really do with it except make starters...
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Old 03-26-2009, 11:51 PM   #7
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I don't think this has anything to do with using a bottling wand (unless the wand wasn't sanitized).

Jim

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Old 03-26-2009, 11:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougan View Post
I've had off flavors that match this description well in a few of my brews. It spans between yeast strains, fermentors, and extract/all grain. It's weird, but I do understand your 'bitter' description. It's not a hop bitterness but it most definitely does have a bitter bite to it. One batch was a pale ale that was a bit more on the bitter side to begin with and it's almost undrinkable. I think it might be related to fermenting temps. The past few brews I've made, I've paid strong attention to the ferm temps (and kept them low) and they've all not had this flavor. Still haven't decided if this is a coincidence or not. I should try a split batch and ferment one at 60 and one at 70 and report what I notice. I might actually do that this weekend, as I have a lot of extract lying around and nothing to really do with it except make starters...
i think you are on to something. being i noob i am still working out my proceedure and these batches were fermented at the top of the temp range.....i am still mystified why some were tasting good though ???
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Old 03-27-2009, 12:59 AM   #9
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First things first, ferment in the mid 60's at the highest. Water bath and ice if necessary for the first 5 days.

Second, to try to reduce the oxygenation of your beers when bottling, poke the wands plunger in the bottle where the side meets the bottom, and then slowly apply pressure so you get just a trickle and minimal splashing, after a few seconds , the beer should be above the plunger and then you can jam it all the way down and fill as normal.

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Old 03-27-2009, 01:13 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedIrocZ-28 View Post
First things first, ferment in the mid 60's at the highest. Water bath and ice if necessary for the first 5 days.

Second, to try to reduce the oxygenation of your beers when bottling, poke the wands plunger in the bottle where the side meets the bottom, and then slowly apply pressure so you get just a trickle and minimal splashing, after a few seconds , the beer should be above the plunger and then you can jam it all the way down and fill as normal.

i need to refine my want technique. but the question remains would that sort of oxygen exposure cause off flavors like this ? or am i looking at some other cause ??
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