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Old 06-13-2012, 11:31 PM   #1
shawnfoxall
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Default Bottling process !

I have just bottled my first batch of homebrew . How long does it need to stay in the bottle before I can take it out ?? I am sure like many of you when you first start out you just can't wait to taste the first batch. It was bottled on Sunday I was thinking at least a week but I am not sure. It was brewed using a concentrate if that matters.
Thanks for your help .

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Old 06-13-2012, 11:39 PM   #2
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General rule of thumb is 3 weeks for a standard gravity ale, if you're storing the bottles at 70F.

FWIW, my first ale was a kit by Brewer's Best. I had carbonated beer after 2 weeks, but it wasn't even. Some were perfect, and some foamed half the beer out of the bottle. After 3 weeks it was more even, and the longer it sat the better it was carbonated (and the better it tasted).

When a bottle carbonates itself, the yeast produces CO2 that pressurizes the head space first. Then that CO2 is slowly absorbed BACK into the liquid, giving your beer CO2 in the liquid, which is what bubbles out slowly as you actually drink it.

Crack it too soon, and either the yeast hasn't produced enough CO2, or all the CO2 will escape out the top of your glass and not enough will actually be dissolved IN the beer. Chilling for 48 hours before you drink it will help dissolve the CO2 further.

Now, I totally get what you mean....patience is THE HARDEST part about brewing. If I were you, I'd go ahead and brew beer 2 while you wait..that helps. If you really want to, crack one and drink it. You'll learn about the CO2 process, and taste what "green beer" tastes like.

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Even ales take too long. I need something I can ferment during the boil and drink from the kettle!
You have to grow old, you don't have to grow up.
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Old 06-13-2012, 11:41 PM   #3
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I stored it in a fridge. I am guessing that was a big mistake ? And it's just a nutty brown ale.

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Old 06-13-2012, 11:43 PM   #4
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Not a big mistake at all. Pull them out, give them a shake/swirl to get yeast back into suspension and throw them in a closet for a few weeks and you'll be good!

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Originally Posted by SittingDuck
Even ales take too long. I need something I can ferment during the boil and drink from the kettle!
You have to grow old, you don't have to grow up.
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Old 06-13-2012, 11:56 PM   #5
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Revvy's bottling tips.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/bott...ebrewer-94812/

3 weeks at 70 then refrigerate a couple for 2 or 3 days for testing.

The sticky's have ton's of useful tid bits that calm the fears of us noobies. Welcome to the madness.

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Old 06-13-2012, 11:58 PM   #6
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Thanks guys , I appreciate the info. I am sure you will hear back from me soon.

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Old 06-14-2012, 12:00 AM   #7
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Yeah I really should have deferred to Revvy's post.

Welcome to HBT!

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Originally Posted by SittingDuck
Even ales take too long. I need something I can ferment during the boil and drink from the kettle!
You have to grow old, you don't have to grow up.
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Old 06-14-2012, 12:23 AM   #8
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I bottle mine and almost always chill one down at a week, for testing purposes only That gives me a way to gauge how the batch is going to finish up, I usually start real consumption at 2-3 weeks (I do find they are primo around 6 weeks, if they last that long). But I usually have 4 batches in various stages, so keeping the new one aging isn't a huge problem. When the pipeline is running low I start to get to thinking I may have to resort to buying brews, and sometimes I do. Get the pipeline going, have fun, and enjoy your brew.

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Old 06-14-2012, 12:33 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ButcherBoy
I bottle mine and almost always chill one down at a week, for testing purposes only That gives me a way to gauge how the batch is going to finish up, I usually start real consumption at 2-3 weeks (I do find they are primo around 6 weeks, if they last that long). But I usually have 4 batches in various stages, so keeping the new one aging isn't a huge problem. When the pipeline is running low I start to get to thinking I may have to resort to buying brews, and sometimes I do. Get the pipeline going, have fun, and enjoy your brew.
Agreed!

I highly suggest setting aside a six pack and not touching it, even if you run out...my first beer at 5 months was way better than any first attempt at anything else I've ever done in my life. It was also awesome on it's own. Had a buddy who didn't realize it was homebrew ask where he could buy a six pack
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Originally Posted by SittingDuck
Even ales take too long. I need something I can ferment during the boil and drink from the kettle!
You have to grow old, you don't have to grow up.
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Old 06-14-2012, 12:47 AM   #10
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5 months ? I have never had a beer last near that amount of time lol. But I will try it and see what happens. Thanks for the suggestions. I am going to start a new batch this weekend so I just have a starter kit with the bucket and carboy. I need another bucket so I can do two at once. It looks like this is going to turn into a full time hobby for me.

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