Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Bottling ?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-09-2012, 03:50 PM   #11
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2733 Times on 1640 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

The thing to realize too is, if you're bottling, it's going to take AT LEAST three weeks for the beer to carb if the beer is above 70 consistently....that puts it at Oct 30th anyway....

__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 03:53 PM   #12
JordanThomas
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
Posts: 889
Liked 82 Times on 77 Posts
Likes Given: 426

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsiesener View Post
I'm not really trying to rush things in a way. But I had a party come up and was wondering if I could have a drinkable beer by then. I still need to figure out what is the route I need to take with using secondaries if I am not adding anything. I guess what everyone is saying is personsal preference. My next brew will be a Belgian Witbier, is there a difference with types of brews that yes you should use a secondary or no you can just leave in the primary for longer. I do understand the theory of leaving in primary for longer and then bottle to reduce the risk of contamination and oxygenation.
I would say that anything that has a lot of added "stuff" would be a good candidate for secondary. Pumpkin ales, brews with coffee grounds or chocolate, etc.
__________________
JordanThomas is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 03:55 PM   #13
Matt3989
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 452
Liked 44 Times on 38 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsiesener

I'm not really trying to rush things in a way. But I had a party come up and was wondering if I could have a drinkable beer by then. I still need to figure out what is the route I need to take with using secondaries if I am not adding anything. I guess what everyone is saying is personsal preference. My next brew will be a Belgian Witbier, is there a difference with types of brews that yes you should use a secondary or no you can just leave in the primary for longer. I do understand the theory of leaving in primary for longer and then bottle to reduce the risk of contamination and oxygenation.
Logically, what benefits would you see from putting it in a second container? I don't want this to become another secondary or not thread.

Yeast and trub will settle out the same in the primary container as they do in the secondary, and as long as you're not aging longer than 3 or 4 months, then you'll see no harm from leaving the beer in the original container.
__________________
Matt3989 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 04:20 PM   #14
jsiesener
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 19
Likes Given: 11

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt3989 View Post
Are you saying you measured the FG and got 1.10 or that's just what it's supposed to be?

How long had it been in the secondary? And idk where you heard to leave it in the secondary for one week, the classic mantra is 1 week primary, 2 weeks secondary, 3 weeks bottles. But really i think it should be 3-4 weeks primary, and 4-5 weeks in bottles.

Everyone is impatient their first brew though, especially if you don't have anything else to brew at the time. You can bottle it now, but like said before, the beer won't be ideal, especially a cream ale since it should have a fairly clean flavor.

If you do decide to bottle it soon, i would try top cold crash it for 2 days to clear it up a bit. And it might just have to condition in bottles longer before it really becomes good.
I am getting my information straight from the kit directions, and also trying to read forum questions and answers and piece things together.
__________________
jsiesener is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 04:39 PM   #15
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Between here and there, and everywhere
Posts: 12,058
Liked 477 Times on 420 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsiesener View Post
I am getting my information straight from the kit directions, and also trying to read forum questions and answers and piece things together.
Kits are notorious for having bad/poor instructions with them. They will very often rush you through the process and include dated methods (racking to secondary for no valid reason). IME/IMO, you're better off skipping racking to secondary for the vast majority of brews. I typically go with a long primary (2-12 weeks is my range currently) and then go to bottle/keg. I do have two batches aging with wood in them, that did get transferred to aging vessels (25L sanke kegs) many months ago. That was after enough time had passed for the yeast to finish doing what it would/could.

IF you're really looking to get brews to glass faster, you can shave some time off of the process by kegging. Then it depends on which carbonation method you go with. Personally, I use the two weeks at serving pressure method, so only shaving a week off of normal brews. The advantage really comes about when you keg bigger brews. Ones that could take many weeks, or even months, to bottle carbonate will take the same ~2 weeks at serving pressure/temperature to carbonate in keg. You can then bottle from keg (different methods available there) to give some away.
__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 04:49 PM   #16
Matt3989
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 452
Liked 44 Times on 38 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsiesener

I am getting my information straight from the kit directions, and also trying to read forum questions and answers and piece things together.
I didn't mean that to come off like i doubted you, sorry if it sounded short. I know that there is a lot of information out there, some of it is good, some of it is bad. So i just wanted to give you the normal example from kits/out dated books. And then also give you the advice that I've learned from a few brews and a ton of reading.

But as to your original question. If you'd like to bottle it and have it ready sooner, do it. But be aware that it might be pretty green, it might not even be fully carbed by then. But if it's not you can just leave it in the bottles and let it condition for a few more weeks. although leaving it in the fermenting vessel will help it clear up more, and also probably clean up the flavors faster.
__________________
Matt3989 is offline
jsiesener Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 05:08 PM   #17
JordanThomas
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
Posts: 889
Liked 82 Times on 77 Posts
Likes Given: 426

Default

I read in one post on this forum that I cannot specifically recall, but someone used a small plastic bottle (those weird new coke 8 oz'ers would work) to bottle with each batch. It allowed them to determine carbonation level by how firm the plastic bottle was. I thought that was an ingenious way to decide whether the beer was carb'd enough to crack open! Unfortunately I completely forgot to do it for my last batch.

__________________
JordanThomas is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 05:15 PM   #18
Matt3989
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 452
Liked 44 Times on 38 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

That's actually how Mr. beer kit does it, you can buy just those bottle for pretty cheap on Amazon. I prefer just opening one a week and drinking it though it helps me learn the changes the beer goes through over time too.

__________________
Matt3989 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 05:24 PM   #19
JordanThomas
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
Posts: 889
Liked 82 Times on 77 Posts
Likes Given: 426

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt3989 View Post
That's actually how Mr. beer kit does it, you can buy just those bottle for pretty cheap on Amazon. I prefer just opening one a week and drinking it though it helps me learn the changes the beer goes through over time too.
That's true, but those are large bottles. At least with the little plastic bottle you won't be wasting a large amount of beer. I don't mind the wait a week, wait another method, either.
__________________
JordanThomas is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-09-2012, 06:56 PM   #20
jsiesener
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 19
Likes Given: 11

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt3989 View Post
I didn't mean that to come off like i doubted you, sorry if it sounded short. I know that there is a lot of information out there, some of it is good, some of it is bad. So i just wanted to give you the normal example from kits/out dated books. And then also give you the advice that I've learned from a few brews and a ton of reading.

But as to your original question. If you'd like to bottle it and have it ready sooner, do it. But be aware that it might be pretty green, it might not even be fully carbed by then. But if it's not you can just leave it in the bottles and let it condition for a few more weeks. although leaving it in the fermenting vessel will help it clear up more, and also probably clean up the flavors faster.
I appreciate all of the advice, and I also did not try to make it sound like you came across short. I know that I have a long way to go, but am excited to get there. It is frustrating to read the directions and then hear all of this other info and try to figure out the best procedure.
__________________
jsiesener is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
bottling question why use a bottling wand? sheldon123 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 26 01-10-2013 07:44 AM
Bottling without bottling bucket TwoDollarBill Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 04-16-2011 10:18 PM
Bottling w/o bottling bucket FatherT515 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 2 03-03-2011 03:08 AM
Bottling with no bottling bucket! stevedasleeve Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 11-15-2009 02:17 PM
bottling Q. kennyv95 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 12-04-2006 08:55 PM