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Old 05-17-2013, 07:09 PM   #1
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Default Bottle Carbination Calculator

I am using both BeerSmith2 and iBrewMaster2 currently and both have bottle carbing calculators. I understand everything there BUT the temp input.

What temp is this supposed to be? The temperature of the beer when adding priming sugar? The temp I'll be carbing at?

Any input would be helpful!

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Old 05-17-2013, 07:38 PM   #2
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Usually the temperature you are carbing at, remember to keep it at a temperature that will not make the yeast dormant. So usually about what you fermented at.

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Old 05-17-2013, 07:52 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by 5oBrewing
Usually the temperature you are carbing at, remember to keep it at a temperature that will not make the yeast dormant. So usually about what you fermented at.
Oh snap, that might account for my first few bottles being geysers. Good to know.

I have been carbing at ambient temp in my basement (which hovers around 75) almost all the time except for when the outside temp breaks 85.

Thanks for the info!

Do you think I should move my bottle carbing to 65f in my fermentation chamber?
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Old 05-17-2013, 08:07 PM   #4
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Usually the temperature you are carbing at, remember to keep it at a temperature that will not make the yeast dormant. So usually about what you fermented at.
I dont agree, temperature in this kind of calculators is the highest temperature beer was kept after the fermentation finished. CO2 dissolves in beer during fermentation and you have some remaining CO2 after fermentation is done (and how much depends on temperature) so if you ferment at 64F and keep it at 64 till botteling then input 64F in the priming calculator, but if you let it warm to let say 75F then you input 75 in the calculator. At 75 there will be less residual CO2 in your beer than at 64 (more CO2 dissolve in the liquid at lower temperature) and you ill have to use more sugar to get the same level of carbonation
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Old 05-17-2013, 11:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polboy

I dont agree, temperature in this kind of calculators is the highest temperature beer was kept after the fermentation finished. CO2 dissolves in beer during fermentation and you have some remaining CO2 after fermentation is done (and how much depends on temperature) so if you ferment at 64F and keep it at 64 till botteling then input 64F in the priming calculator, but if you let it warm to let say 75F then you input 75 in the calculator. At 75 there will be less residual CO2 in your beer than at 64 (more CO2 dissolve in the liquid at lower temperature) and you ill have to use more sugar to get the same level of carbonation
Ah, I see. That seems to make sense! Thanks!
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Old 05-17-2013, 11:06 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polboy

I dont agree, temperature in this kind of calculators is the highest temperature beer was kept after the fermentation finished. CO2 dissolves in beer during fermentation and you have some remaining CO2 after fermentation is done (and how much depends on temperature) so if you ferment at 64F and keep it at 64 till botteling then input 64F in the priming calculator, but if you let it warm to let say 75F then you input 75 in the calculator. At 75 there will be less residual CO2 in your beer than at 64 (more CO2 dissolve in the liquid at lower temperature) and you ill have to use more sugar to get the same level of carbonation
+1 to ^^this^^
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Old 05-17-2013, 11:10 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by duboman

+1 to ^^this^^
Thank you for weighing in on this! This going to probably help solve the issues that I have had when I have been bottling!
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Old 05-18-2013, 05:26 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polboy View Post
I dont agree, temperature in this kind of calculators is the highest temperature beer was kept after the fermentation finished. CO2 dissolves in beer during fermentation and you have some remaining CO2 after fermentation is done (and how much depends on temperature) so if you ferment at 64F and keep it at 64 till botteling then input 64F in the priming calculator, but if you let it warm to let say 75F then you input 75 in the calculator. At 75 there will be less residual CO2 in your beer than at 64 (more CO2 dissolve in the liquid at lower temperature) and you ill have to use more sugar to get the same level of carbonation
What about lagering? I assume there is still some final fermentation going on when the temps are colder. Do you use 35 or what ever it might be? I have my first lager about ready to bottle and assumed I would bottle cold instead of letting it warm up.

Very timely thread and response..Thanks..
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Old 05-18-2013, 06:19 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vNmd

What about lagering? I assume there is still some final fermentation going on when the temps are colder. Do you use 35 or what ever it might be? I have my first lager about ready to bottle and assumed I would bottle cold instead of letting it warm up.

Very timely thread and response..Thanks..
After you lager, you can still bottle-condition at room temperature. Some people who don't have a place to properly lager in the carboy will bottle the beer, let it carbonate for 3 weeks, and then cold-condition the bottled beer in the fridge for the lagering period after that.
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Old 05-18-2013, 06:33 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by vNmd View Post
What about lagering? I assume there is still some final fermentation going on when the temps are colder. Do you use 35 or what ever it might be? I have my first lager about ready to bottle and assumed I would bottle cold instead of letting it warm up.

Very timely thread and response..Thanks..
Fermentation is over before lagering is begun, so it won't produce more co2 at those cold temperatures. You would still use the diacetyl rest temperature (generally in the 60s for most lagers).

I really really hate those calculators by the way! They have you carb "to style", which in some ways can be helpful. But they may tell you that an English pale ale should be .75 volumes, while a lambic should be 4.6 volumes. That means the EPA would be totally flat, while the lambic would cause bottle bombs if carbed that highly!

I like almost all of my bottled beers carbed at about 2.6-2.7 volumes anyway, regardless of style, so I use 1 ounce of corn sugar per gallon of finished beer for almost all of my beers.
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