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Old 05-21-2012, 08:12 PM   #11
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If you get a stainless brew kettle, you also have the option of using an induction cooker.

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Old 05-21-2012, 08:35 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimpanogosSlim View Post
yeah, the only question is if you WANT to do that in the summer.
Open your windows and get a fan going for sure. I can get 9 gallons to a rolling boil on my gas stove. If my pot would hold more, I could probably do more.
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Old 05-21-2012, 08:48 PM   #13
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7 gallon boil on the electric stone all the time.

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Old 05-21-2012, 08:57 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimpanogosSlim View Post
yeah, the only question is if you WANT to do that in the summer.
The weather in my area is very cool, even in summer.
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Old 09-26-2012, 05:06 PM   #15
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Whats the BTU output of the burner you use to boil 6+ gallons of wort on an indoor gas stove/rangetop? My Blichmann Floor Burner is 72,000 BTUs and it takes a good 20-30 min to boil that kind of volume. I thought most gas ranges were around 12k to 18k BTUs.

Cheers!

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Old 09-26-2012, 05:38 PM   #16
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I think the big burner on the stove I use is in the 16-17k range. Like I posted earlier, it takes a little over an hour for my already hot runoff to boil. I have found that loosely wrapping the top of the pot in foil helps, it makes a little tent to trap more of the burner's heat as it escapes around the pot, and I like to think that the shiny surface helps reflect the heat back inwards.

edit: I just looked it up, my big burner is 16,000 BTU. And this is with a 10 gallon aluminum stockpot. I think you start to get diminishing returns with bigger burners, so much of the heat is wasted to the air. This is why heatsticks/e-brewing can be so much more efficient and cheaper than gas, even though per BTU electric heat is much more expensive than gas heat.

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Old 08-24-2013, 07:52 PM   #17
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I just did a definitive test on the times to boil 6 gallons of water on my gas stovetop. This is a plain jane gas burner stovetop in a rented apt.; estimated BTU per burner is 5k BTU.
From front to back, my burners are 12" apart measuring from the outer edge of each burner. I put my 10 gallon pot which is 13.6 inches in diameter across both as evenly as I could, filled it with 6 gallons of tap water, placed foil around the edges of the lid to get the best possible seal, then cranked the gas on both burners, and checked the temp of the water at 15 minutes intervals.
Time Temp
0 minutes 80 deg F
15 minutes 120 deg F
30 minutes 155 deg F
45 minutes 182 deg F
60 minutes 205 deg F -piddly boil
75 minutes 212 deg F -rolling boil

So what does all this mean?
1) Yes, you can get a full boil on the stovetop with 6 gallons of water.
2) Probably, a wider pot would catch more heat and boil faster. About 1/3 and maybe even 1/2 of the flames from both burners were actually riding up outside of the pot and not underneath.
3) I will be upgrading to a kettle that is 15.25 inches diameter. And that will catch more heat from the burners underneath the pot, boil faster, and allow for ridiculously big 5 gallon batches without spillage.

Boom. Upgrade time.

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Old 08-24-2013, 07:59 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_strangebru View Post

So what does all this mean?
Given enough time you could probably boil on one burner and save a little gas. Back in my stovetop days I remember fashioning a partial lid with aluminum foil on the brew pot to maintain a nice boil...not pretty but it works. Or build a simple heatstick and likely do ten gallon batches stovetop. I have found there is usually a work around if your willing to spend a little time and money.

I also have a hunch that an aluminum brew kettle might be more suited to stovetopping due to better heat exchange. I also have a hunch that tri-clad bottom kettles waste a bit of energy and may boil less volume for a given heat applied, perhaps not the best choice for stovetopping.

YMMV...cheers!
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Old 08-24-2013, 09:39 PM   #19
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Time! Who wants to wait? This is America!!

As a follow up study I filled up this same brewpot -BC 40qt tri-clad- up to 9.5 gallons, it's maximum. And cranked up the heat again.
Starting from 140 degrees; it had a rolling boil at the one hour time point.
So, two burners on a regular gas stovetop can provide enough energy to get 9.5 gallons up to a boil.
Sure, it makes sense to get a heatstick. But that's an 'add-on.'
It's complicating my mojo.

The question is answered so much as:
One pot over 2 burners on a gas stove can boil 5 gallons with the lid on for a tri-clad 10 gallon pot. Also, 9.5 gallons can vigorously boil with the lid on.

I did not see how it would boil with the lid off. My assumption is that a 5 gallon vigorous boil with the lid off is possible.
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