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Old 12-28-2011, 12:39 PM   #1
natemtb
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Default Boil Evaporation?

I would like to do a full 5 gallon boil on my next batch. I was wondering if any of you guys know how much water I need to start with? 60 min. Boil, 70 quart pot, ambient temp 45-50 degrees f. Is my pot big enough? Should I add water as I go or put it all in from the beginning?
Or any other tips and suggestions?

I did a quick search but my doing it on my phone I couldn't find much. Thanks in advance for your help and input!
Thanks,
Nate

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Old 12-28-2011, 12:47 PM   #2
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I usually boil about 6.25-6.5 gallons of wort and end up with a little over 5.5 when I am finished.

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Old 12-28-2011, 12:50 PM   #3
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6.5-7 gallons you take boil off and trub that should get you 5-5.5 in the ferm. You may have to adjust this on your next brew so take notes. There is no formula for all I have a boiloff rate of 1.5gph and that took several brew days to dial in.
Also never forget that if you have to much wort after 1 hour continue boiling until it gets to where you want it. I regularly do 90 minute boils.

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Old 12-28-2011, 01:11 PM   #4
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I start with 6.5 and am usually very close to 5 after all the transfers, tubing, etc. Your methods will vary, of course, but 6.5 is a good starting point to account for evaporation with a decent rolling boil.

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Old 12-28-2011, 01:27 PM   #5
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The actual evaporation rate depends on your pot dimensions, and how hard you boil. So as others have said, start with 6.5. But after 60 minutes, be sure to make a note of the new level of the wort in your pot. That way you'll know the % you boiled off, and you will be able to properly estimate the amount you would need for a longer boil. Or a different sized batch.

FYI - the humidity in the air matters. When I boiled in the garage, in the winter, on a cold dry day, I boiled off a full extra gallon. So if you happen to be outside in the winter, you may want to up your starting wort a little bit.

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Old 12-28-2011, 01:40 PM   #6
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I found out the hard way that when using a full boil size pot, I need to add basically the amount of water to start with that equals the wort I want to end up with. The kit can and extracts need to be taken into account and they will raise the quantity a good amount. If I was using grains, the water would probably increase due in part to the boiling times.

And don't forget to scratch a line for the final wort quantity on the inside of the pan. Also marking 5 gallons and 6 gallons is helpful too.

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Old 12-28-2011, 01:44 PM   #7
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I usually lose about 1 gallon in the summer months and 1.5 gallons in the winter months. Just depends on your pots liquid surface area, boil rate, outside humidity, etc... it'll take a few brew days to dial down. I would shoot high at first, say around 2 gallons or so, then time the rate of boil off to help with future brews. This way you can always boil down to your desired gravity. You could also just put a few gallons in your pot and boil for an hour just to calculate your boil off rate. It may cost a little bit in propane, but save the risk of ruining a good brew day.

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Old 12-28-2011, 05:49 PM   #8
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Thank you all

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Old 12-28-2011, 06:42 PM   #9
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So if you measure wrong and are short a gallon in your carboy, what effect is it gonna have? can you add more water after fermentation?

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Old 12-28-2011, 07:29 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamPag View Post
So if you measure wrong and are short a gallon in your carboy, what effect is it gonna have? can you add more water after fermentation?
Don't water down the fermented beer. Add water to the carboy before you pitch the yeast.

By shorting the water, you are strengthening the beer. It could be enough to affect fermentation to where you may need more yeast.
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