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Old 12-15-2008, 01:38 PM   #1
phidelt844
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Default Beware oversize pots on the stovetop!

So I decided I would try out my third brew yesterday, and maybe test out my shiny new 15g aluminum pot on the stove, since I'm still waiting on a propane burner. I woke up early and tossed a few gallons in to boil to "treat" the aluminum. Around 45 mins later it was still not at a boil, and there was this funky smell eminating from the pot. Once my smoke alarms started blaring, I decided I'd check a bit closer... sure enough, the heat was trapped under the overhanging sides of the pot and scorched the bejesus out of my stove. I also had a little bit of countertop meltage where the edge of my stove meets it. Needless to say, I felt like a complete idiot.. so be wary when using those wide pots on the stovetop!

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Old 12-16-2008, 01:40 AM   #2
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You're doing the boil on the stove? Crazy stuff. IMO you won't really get a rolling boil on the stove- you need to invest in a turkey burner or three ring

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Old 12-16-2008, 01:46 AM   #3
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You're doing the boil on the stove? Crazy stuff. IMO you won't really get a rolling boil on the stove- you need to invest in a turkey burner or three ring
You really don't want a roiling boil...just a gentle boil. I have no problem doing 3-4 gallon boils on the stove. For my 5.25 gallon brews, I just split them into two 3 gallon mini-batches, then recombine. Outdoors is not a practical option for me, being an apartment dweller.

15 gallons in one pot is really pushing it beyond anything reasonable for stove top, though.
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Old 12-16-2008, 01:55 AM   #4
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You really don't want a roiling boil...just a gentle boil.
Here's a good read on the subject. The short of it is that you want a full rolling boil.
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One of the most important reactions that occurs in the wort boil is the formation of "hot break". Hot break is the coagulation of proteins, formation of protein-polyphenol complexes, and reaction with hop compounds to create larger particles that will sediment out in the whirlpool at the end of the boil. These reactions occur at higher rates at higher temperatures and more agitation. This is why your wort boil must be full and rolling... the more vigorous and turbulent the boil, the more of these compounds form over time..
The Beer Life of Brian: Importance of a Full Wort Boil

May be this guy is wrong, but I believe him
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Old 12-16-2008, 02:06 AM   #5
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Just moved from a place where I was using a Turkey Fryer to an apartment and was nervous about doing a full boil on the stove. I have a gas stove and successfully brought 6 gallons of wort (hopefully soon to be mocha porter) to a rolling boil by straddling the 7.5 gallon aluminum pot that came with my turkey fryer across two gas burners. Took about an hour to bring to a boil but it worked!

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Old 12-16-2008, 03:22 AM   #6
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Jamil says you dont need a jet blaster boil. It should be boiling pretty good, but there should not be any wort jumping out of the pot.

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Old 12-16-2008, 03:28 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelikan View Post
You really don't want a roiling boil...just a gentle boil. I have no problem doing 3-4 gallon boils on the stove. For my 5.25 gallon brews, I just split them into two 3 gallon mini-batches, then recombine. Outdoors is not a practical option for me, being an apartment dweller.

15 gallons in one pot is really pushing it beyond anything reasonable for stove top, though.

You really do want a rolling boil, not a violent boil, but rolling for certain. This is basically brewing 101.
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Old 12-16-2008, 04:11 AM   #8
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I guess we're having an issue of semantics, not fact. I understand the importance of a full boil, but I suppose I associate "roiling" with "violent" (and notice I say "roiling," not "rolling;" there is a difference between the two). In other words, the boil should be going fairly well, enough to get the liquid "stirring" itself, but as someone else said, not jumping out of the pot. A contained but active boil, I suppose.

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Old 12-16-2008, 02:48 PM   #9
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Not sure if your electric or gas on your stove. If your electric and your going to keep doing stuff like this, you can get a "canning element" for your stove (unless its a GE) that will raise the element up a bit and also add more support.

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Old 12-16-2008, 03:12 PM   #10
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I think raising the burner, if possible, is an excellent idea.

I've decided which propane burner I'm going for, so that will be the next equipment upgrade. I'll stick with my small 5g kettle until then!

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