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Old 06-10-2013, 09:06 AM   #1
samg
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Default Best IPA and tecnique

I've made 2 batches of beer to date and while they were ok, they were rushed and I'm sure could have been better.

So, I'm going to do an other, but do it properly now, on the advice from you guys!

I'm after doing something quite mild and light, a IPA really. What would everyone recommend? Also, the best process to brew the particular beer would be good.

Last time, we upped the temp (to the max the instructions said) to brew it quickly, but I now understand it should be so slow and steady.

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Old 06-10-2013, 10:45 AM   #2
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I'm after doing something quite mild and light, a IPA really.
Sounds contradictory to me.
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Old 06-10-2013, 11:32 AM   #3
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For mild and light you probably want something along the lines of a blonde or a cream ale.

As for your question about an IPA, check out the Recipies section. Many good recipes to choose from. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f69/ some of the all grain ones even contain extract versions. Also, is there a particular IPA you enjoy enough that you want to make a similar recipe? Do you want a more malt forward, or dry IPA?

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Old 06-10-2013, 11:48 AM   #4
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I mostly drink local ales, so Rebellion IPA is a big one.

Just after something not too heavy or dark.

I'll take a look at the recipes, thanks.

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Old 06-10-2013, 02:07 PM   #5
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If you use specialty grains for an extract IPA, I may recommend first wort hopping. Add the bitterring hops to the boil kettle when you put the grain bag in the water. Make sure not to put the hops in the grain bag, you want them to stay in the water for the boil. This will smooth out the bitterness, and from what I've seen a lot of people tend to first wort hop their hoppy ipas and pale ales.

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Old 06-10-2013, 02:28 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samg View Post

I'm after doing something quite mild and light, a IPA really. What would everyone recommend? Also, the best process to brew the particular beer would be good.

Last time, we upped the temp (to the max the instructions said) to brew it quickly, but I now understand it should be so slow and steady.
Well I don't think of IPA's as "mild and light"... in fact I would say the opposite.

You could brew a English Mild (AKA: a Northern Brown Ale) or you could brew as suggested a Kolsch, Cream Ale, or my favorites for this time of year (English Summer Ale or Wheat Beer).

I would not worry about you "SPEED" as long as you followed the process, and you wrote it down so in a year you can refresh your memory...

Some ALES can be brewed and in the keg in less thatn two weeks others more...It usually depends on the gravity; the lower the gravity the faster it finishes...

My 5% ABV (plus) beers spend at least 3 weeks fermenting and then kegged at least two weeks (times vary depending on the style) but I have served beers 17 days from when I made them (force carbonated in a keg).

I say:
  • Learn what flavors you like
  • Figure out what grains and hops produce those flavors
  • Brew the beer (just go for it)
  • Modify it the next time if needed...

I mean everything you brew will come out BEER and most likely be drinkable. Even the stufff you don't like someone will.

Dialing it in to be perfect (If you care) just takes doing it again...

HOW I DID...
After brewing extract for 10 years I went all grain. (I made good beer this way)
I had been doing it long enough that when I bought the MAG How to Brew's 250 clone recipes I could read the recipe and sort of figure out what it tasted like.

That and I brewed some of these beers and got a baseline and then change them...

Happy rewing...

DPB



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Old 06-10-2013, 02:38 PM   #7
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This is my favorite IPA recipe. It's perfect for summer.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f69/dogf...extract-25709/

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Old 06-10-2013, 04:16 PM   #8
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I know what the answer will be! But, is there any good kits out there? As we're just starting out, I'd like to keep it simple for now, and get to grips with basics, before having to boil up etc.

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Old 06-10-2013, 04:49 PM   #9
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I know what the answer will be! But, is there any good kits out there? As we're just starting out, I'd like to keep it simple for now, and get to grips with basics, before having to boil up etc.
Northern Brewer's Dead Ringer IPA. It's a Bell's Two Hearted clone. Use the wy1272 or wlp051 yeast, pitch a good sized starter and ferment cool. it makes a great IPA.
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:29 AM   #10
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Not available in the UK.

Anyone got any recommendations for a UK kit?

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