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Old 01-07-2014, 11:08 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by rodwha View Post
Hmmm… I had figured out how to show the results of a created recipe on Brewtoad so that it does show tenths of alcohol percentages, and their numbers are a little different than yours. The numbers I originally gave were an estimate as I couldn't see what the results were specifically. I had to look at a slide.

It shows that recipe using Nottingham as having an OG of 1.033 and 3.4% ABV with DME and 1.028 and 2.9% ABV with LME, and 29 and 30 IBU's using Goldings, though there's a slide as far as AA's go.

I'm not sure why the difference as I see your math. Brewtoad has been fairly accurate for me.
It has to do with the values that Brewtoad is using to perform calculations, any deviations in how the calculations are being performed, and how rounding is being handled. That's why I do not use brewing software. I want control over how all of my intermediate and final values are handled. I also want to know the exact calculations that are being performed.


Let's look at the O.G. equation

1.75 x 0.046 / 2.5 + 1.0 ~= 1.032

The symbol "~=" is often use in mathematics to denote "approximately equal to" on text-based systems, which is different than "equal to." The actual value is 1.0322. Brewtoad is rounding the value up to 1.033, which is not how I would handle the trailing 2. I would truncate any value in the ten thousandths position that was less than or equal to 4.

I would have to see how Brewtoad is calculating IBUs to evaluate the differences.


Let's look at how ABV is calculated

ABV = O.G. - F.G. x 105 x 1.25

Working an ABV of 3.4% backwards yields an apparent attenuation of

3.4 / 1.25 / 105 / 0.033 x 100 = 79%, which is high for Nottingham when pitched into such a low gravity wort, especially a malt extract-based recipe.

I used an apparent attenuation of 75% in my calculation

(1.032 - 1.008) / 0.032 x 100 = 75%

With that said, the only way to determine the ABV of a batch is to measure the original and final gravities and plug those values into the ABV equation shown above (a hydrometer and an accurate thermometer are essential brewing tools). For example, I recently made an all-grain Pre-Pro Pilsner that had an O.G. of 1.062 and an F.G. of 1.012.

Apparent Attentuation = 1.062 - 1.012 / 0.062 = 80.6%, which is high, but not out of the question considering the grist, mash temperature, and the yeast strain.

ABV = 1.062 - 1.012 x 105 x 1.25 = 6.56%


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Old 01-07-2014, 11:32 PM   #82
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I certainly wouldn't have rounded that up either!

I've only used Hopville, which Brewtoad took over. I also looked at a couple of others, including BeerSmith, but it just seemed much more complicated.

I don't care for the water chemistry and adding a bunch of stuff to my water. I do partial mashes mostly because I can't do a full boil, but also because it allows a little room for error with the water. I've looked at my water report and know that it's quite hard, and so I'll add 1 gal of store bought water with dark beer, and 2 gals if it's a lighter beer. I don't enter contests, and I'm quite happy (most of the time).



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...tasting a beer at 1 week, and again at 2....that to me just means there 2 less beers that are actually tasting good and are ready at the end.
"Anyway on the wall was this sign. People who drink light beer don't really like beer. They just like to piss a lot."

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Old 01-07-2014, 11:58 PM   #83
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E.A.Z.,

Question for you, would that beer be a little less dry if I used S-04? I plan on making it one more time with Nottingham as I do still have half a pack, but I normally use S-04 and like the nice malty finish it gives my beers.

Thanks!

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Old 01-08-2014, 12:19 AM   #84
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Fermentis states a 75% attenuation for S-04. I'm guessing this is an average as it shows no range.

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Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
...tasting a beer at 1 week, and again at 2....that to me just means there 2 less beers that are actually tasting good and are ready at the end.
"Anyway on the wall was this sign. People who drink light beer don't really like beer. They just like to piss a lot."

"Were I to leave where else would I go? Your words of life and of truth You hold." - Third Day
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Old 01-08-2014, 03:43 PM   #85
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Fermentis S-04 is the Whitbread "B" strain, which is the same strain as Wyeast 1098 and White Labs WLP007. Whitbread "B" is not exactly what I would call a malty yeast strain. If you are limiting your choices to dry yeast (which I only use in emergencies), the maltiest strain available is Windsor. Windsor is maltotriose challenged, which is the most common three-part sugar in wort. The maltiest ale yeast strain that I have ever used is Wissenchaftliche Station #338 (a.k.a. Wyeast 1338 European Ale).

By the way, if you make the Mild recipe again, you may want to limit the amount of chocolate malt to one ounce. While less bitter than black patent malt, chocolate malt does add a bitter edge to beer.

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Old 01-08-2014, 04:49 PM   #86
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Thanks, I stick with dry due to cost, 1 package for 2 batches

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Old 01-08-2014, 05:23 PM   #87
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If you create a larger starter you can keep any yeast strain going with no additional cost other than the DME you use. You could even create multiple jars of it so as to make it last that much longer. This can really drop your expense, and allow you to try various liquid strains that opens so many more doors.

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...tasting a beer at 1 week, and again at 2....that to me just means there 2 less beers that are actually tasting good and are ready at the end.
"Anyway on the wall was this sign. People who drink light beer don't really like beer. They just like to piss a lot."

"Were I to leave where else would I go? Your words of life and of truth You hold." - Third Day
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Old 01-08-2014, 05:32 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skitter View Post
E.A.Z.,

Question for you, would that beer be a little less dry if I used S-04? I plan on making it one more time with Nottingham as I do still have half a pack, but I normally use S-04 and like the nice malty finish it gives my beers.

Thanks!
Munton's regular (not the Gold) is also a good choice for a higher finishing gravity. Usually that's a flaw in yeast, but if you it a little less dry, that's an option for dry yeast, too. (And cheap!)
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Old 01-08-2014, 05:34 PM   #89
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Munton's regular (not the Gold) is also a good choice for a higher finishing gravity. Usually that's a flaw in yeast, but if you it a little less dry, that's an option for dry yeast, too. (And cheap!)
I don't want it as dry lol that's why I wanted to stick with S-04, I like the profile it leaves.
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:32 PM   #90
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I don't want it as dry lol that's why I wanted to stick with S-04, I like the profile it leaves.
That's what I mean. Munton's keeps it malty (less "dry") but it is a dehydrated ("dry") yeast, so it is cheaper.


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