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Old 04-15-2009, 03:00 AM   #1
michschr
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Default beginner's kit or something else?

I'm wondering if someone out there can tell me whether it would be better to buy a beginner's brewing kit from a homebrew store or not. I want to begin to brew my own beer, but money is somewhat of a concern. Should I go for a cheaper kit (cheaper because it contains plastic rather than glass items) or will I be severely disadvantaged because of it? I recognize the end product will be a little different from that of glass, but at this point it is my only option. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Gracias

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Old 04-15-2009, 03:04 AM   #2
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This is only my personal opinion, but when I bought my kit I opted to get the deluxe kit with glass carboys, and I don't regret it at all. this is an addicting hobby, so it won't be a cheap one. If you want to start out with PET plastic bottles on the cheap, get a couple of these Five Gallon Bottle with blue handle - PureFlo Online Store I just bought a couple myself as secondary fermenters. both with shipping cost $27

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Old 04-15-2009, 03:06 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michschr View Post
I'm wondering if someone out there can tell me whether it would be better to buy a beginner's brewing kit from a homebrew store or not. I want to begin to brew my own beer, but money is somewhat of a concern. Should I go for a cheaper kit (cheaper because it contains plastic rather than glass items) or will I be severely disadvantaged because of it? I recognize the end product will be a little different from that of glass, but at this point it is my only option. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Gracias
I still use plastic buckets as my primaries.

No kit...no matter how "beginner" will have equipment that goes obsolete as you increase your brewing. There will always be a use for that equipment.

Figure out what you can afford. Bump it by 20% so you don't have "should have got that" remorse. Then spend your money on ingredients and get brewing.

One big hint...as soon as you have your first beer in the fermenter...you're going to want to do another one right away...trust me. So plan and spend accordingly.
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Old 04-15-2009, 03:07 AM   #4
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Plastic is fine and will last many years. Many long time brewers including myself brew in plastic. You would not be able to tell any difference between beers brewed in plastic and those in glass.

Brewing beginners kits are not like some other hobby "beginner" kits, you will use the items for a long time. Eventually you may want to add to the "toys" but a basic kit will get you making beer.

Welcome to HBT!

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Old 04-15-2009, 03:08 AM   #5
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You don't need glass or secondaries.

If you know what you need and cheaper ways to get it build up all your own equipment otherwise get a starter kit.

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Old 04-15-2009, 03:38 AM   #6
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Just get whatever you can to start brewing. You can always add onto your collection of buckets and carboys as you go. At times I still find myself stuck for a carboy of a partiucular size and end up going to the homebrew shop to pick another one up. Just try out a batch, see if you like making it, and then go from there!

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Old 04-15-2009, 03:41 AM   #7
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Nothing wrong with plastic - plus if you decide to change to glass later, you can find plenty of uses for your old plastic buckets...

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Old 04-15-2009, 02:39 PM   #8
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I would get what you can afford and upgrade as you go along...

I was lucky to already have mead making equipment when I started brewing so I didn't have many new items to get. I use both glass and plastic carboys to do my primary brewing in and I also use plastic buckets for some primaries and secondaries. I did not notice any off taste when I made beer in plastic.

The only caveat is to be very careful when cleaning the plastic so that you don't get any scratches that could be a breeding ground for infections. The warning that goes for glass is be very careful, those puppies are heavy and slippery when wet and using an old milk crate for transporting them is a good idea!

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Old 04-15-2009, 02:55 PM   #9
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I am still fairly new to the homebrewing scene, but I opted for the deluxe kit. I figured I would be sticking with the hobby, so I chose to go with an upgraded kit when I first purchased. It was only about 30$ more, so it wasn't a big deal. But if you are strapped for cash, the fermenter buckets are fine. Personally, I like the glass carboy's because I can watch what is going on during the ferment.

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Old 04-15-2009, 03:25 PM   #10
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Start with what you can afford. As a beginner you are not going to notice plastic vs glass difference.

upgrade as you go and can afford to. Save money for ingredients.

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