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Old 07-16-2013, 10:21 PM   #91
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I want to add cherry flavoring to a bock, If i was to simply add a jar of cherries and the juice to the wert, would this have the desired effect?

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Old 07-19-2013, 01:07 AM   #92
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I wanna use a dark malt but I want to also do a dark candi, do I boil this with the malt or add at end of boil?

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Old 07-19-2013, 04:33 PM   #93
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Stir in the candi sugar at the end of the boil. You just need to dissolve it.

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Old 09-06-2013, 04:00 PM   #94
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Originally Posted by new423a View Post
I want to add cherry flavoring to a bock, If i was to simply add a jar of cherries and the juice to the wert, would this have the desired effect?
Are you talking about REAL cherries? Or the cheap candy sugar cherries? Cuz the difference will be noticeable there.

I would suggest adding a jar of REAL cherries to your secondary fermentation (I assume you are doing a secondary??). Might as well add the juice as well. That small amount of juice will have a minimal affect on the overall 5 gallon batch anyway, so might as well add all of it.
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Old 09-20-2013, 05:48 PM   #95
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Originally Posted by Tehan View Post
Why should you not get oxygen in the priming mixture? won't the yeast just use it up during conditioning?
This is a little bit of a sticky wicket. Most of the micro-biology and carbonation scientists I've listened to and read actually say to not worry about it unless you are introducing Oxygen in massive quantities (i.e. splashing and stirring vigorously etc) getting a bottle conditioned beer to oxidize is really tough and usually when I see it the person admits to having poured their primary into their secondary instead of siphoning it. I'd trust the professionals and just minimize it and try not to worry
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Old 09-20-2013, 05:55 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by CarnieBrew View Post
You've never heard of late extract addition? It's pretty much the default method of brewing with extract these days, as people have realised that adding all your DME/LME at the start of the boil, especially when only doing a partial boil, means significant changes to hop additions to adjust for the high boil gravity....and further darkening of the end beer.

Why "should" you boil the extract for the whole hour? There isn't a reason...if you're concerned about bacteria that problem can be solved by boiling it for less than a minute.

For more info, read here: http://beersmith.com/blog/2008/02/20...act-additions/

I think this sticky would benefit from the update.
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Oh okay, didn't know about that. But to be fair, I've been all grain for about 3 or so years, I did my last batch of extract maybe a few months after I wrote the sticky, I'll clarify a touch, let me know if you think it makes sense.
Hey guys, just wanted to ring in with my 2 cents. Most beginners are doing late extract only when the directions tell them to, so I don't know if it's something that should be accepted as a "universal rule" or anything. The main bulk of recipes online are still old recipes and don't call for late extract. Most of the kits that are super bitter or IPA-esque are late extract. It's a good thing, but if you do it with a kit that doesn't call for it you may end up with a 70 IBU oatmeal stout or 100 IBU scotch ale, so maybe it should just be amended with a link to the process of late extract or some kind of stipulation to follow kit recipes instructions first? Just my 2 cents.
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Old 09-23-2013, 02:30 PM   #97
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No,it doesn't matter a whole lot which recipes you use late extract additions with. I've done it with everything from kit-n-kilo to pb/pm biab beers. Ales to hybrid lagers. For example,with AE beers I do a pb of 2.5-3.5 gallons in my 5 gallon BK/MT. I add 1.5-2 pounds of plain light DME to it for all hop additions.
At flame out,I add the remaing DME from the 3lb bag I use along with all the LME,Cooper's can,whatever. Stir in completely & cover to steep a couple minutes. Since the wort was still boiling hot when late additions were added,& pasteurization happens @ 160F,steeping covered a couple minutes works fine. Lighter color & cleaner flavor results. As long as good ferment temps are used as well.

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Old 09-28-2013, 03:58 PM   #98
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Originally Posted by BlackDogBrewing View Post
I don't know that it would burn, but I tie the drawstring cord around the pot handle to never let it touch the bottom.
So you've been bitten by the brewing bug, hopefully. It's a really rewarding hobby. For me it started out a hobby which lead me to go pro.

Don't know why you would burn the bag, when using any grain, you do not want to boil the grains at all! Simply steep them in 150-160 F water, usually 15-20 minutes is sufficient, you're not converting anything. After the steep, remove the bag, don't squeeze! This will add off flavors and tannins.

You can now bring this tea to a boil. I usually boil before adding the extract, if I am doing an extract brew. This can help it from sticking to the bottom and it dissolves a lot faster, especially when using a liquid extract. If using dry malt extract, expect clumps and sticky hands, and watch for boil overs. I find that DME (Dry Malt Extract) boils over more than using LME (Liquid Malt Extract). Stir is until it is dissolved. Some people boil until they see a protein break, you'll see a foam when it first starts boiling, when the foam finally dissipates, you have just completed your break. Now you can add your hops and whatnot. A few things to remember, don't cover! This will create cooked vegetable flavors in your beer.

Use Irish moss, this is a kettle coagulant, you add this about 15 minutes to the end of the boil.

If you are worried about haze in your final product, simply dissolve some gelatin in water and add to your primary, then rack to your secondary. Finings like gelatin will reduce the amount of time it needs to spend in secondary and you will end up with a clearer beer.

Good styles to start out with: Stouts, Pale Ales, and IPAs, why? You can mask a lot of mistakes with darker malts and hops.

Chilling, some people use an ice bath, just be sure to keep it covered in the ice bath so you don't get and wild yeasts. Lactobacillus can take over quickly if you leave the lid off for too long, this will make your beer sour, which is great if you're trying to make a sour. Chill as fast as possible. At around 160-170 F there are a lot of bacteria that can and will infect your beer. You want to chill to about 65-70F if doing an ale, too high you might kill the yeast or end up with gallons of acetone.

Other methods of chilling. Invest in an immersion chiller. You can usually chill your wort down to target temp in 15 minutes or so, but you are still risking infection if exposed to open air.

Better still, plate chillers. These are closed, no exposure to air, they can be hell to clean because they get clogged. You can usually back flush these pretty easily. To avoid clogging, right before transferring, if you have a valve on your kettle, drain off some of the wort till you see no more sludge. This is called cast off. A plate chiller should cool your wort down pretty quickly, but be sure to regulate the flow or it won't cool all the way, this is especially important if you are doing over 5 gallons at a time. You can top off will cold water, but again, you risk contamination.

Avoid splashing it around too much, a little oxygen is okay, it helps the yeast along, but too much and you will end up oxidizing your beer and it will have off flavors.

Once your wort is safely transferred and chilled, add your yeast. You can start off with a starter, mix some cooled wort with the yeast, some people do this the day before and keep it refrigerated until brew day, if you don't go this route, if using liquid yeast, shake it up in the vile or if using a smack pack, smack it at least an hour prior to pitching. Dry yeast, you can usually just pitch it as is, fermentation make take a little longer to start, but it will start.

Avoid lifting the lid to check out how fermentation is coming along if using a bucket. I'm not a huge fan of carboys because they can easily be exposed to light, which will skunk your beer. So be sure to keep it in a cooler, darker place.

On transfer day, like I said above, if you are worried about clarity, add some dissolved gelatin before transferring. I do this so there is a more even mix. Again, avoid sunlight, extreme temperatures, and checking under the lid.

On bottling day, if you are going that route, you can clean your bottles in the dishwasher, but to be extra safe, put them in a solution of iodifur or star san, but only do this after the are cool. These are no-rinse sanitizers. With iodifur, be sure to not use too much or you will get this almost medicinal flavor. Bottling trees are extremely useful for letting that excess liquid to drip out, just be sure to sanitize the bottling tree.

Priming, boil the corn sugar that might come with the recipe kit. You'll want to boil this for about 15 minutes to sanitize it. Avoid using table sugar, this will give your beer a cidery flavor. An alternative to corn sugar is to dissolve malt extract. Add this to your bottling bucket, some people let the priming liquid cool before adding, but it really isn't that necessary, it will cool when the beer hits it. Adding the priming liquid first and then racking your beer into it, will help to provide a more even mix. Don't bother stirring or shaking it, this can lead to oxidation and/or infection. Another alternative is to use priming drops, it's basically a sugar pill which you drop into each bottle. Just make sure your hands are clean. Now bottle! The spring loaded wands are a good way to go, make sure it presses down on the bottom of the bottle, let it over flow just a bit, you are more likely to get a more even fill and this will help to get excess air out, which could lead to beer spoilage and oxidation. Make sure your caps are sanitized, again, you can use a few different no rinse sanitizers, I usually use a bowl of solution to soak my caps, contact time should be anywhere from a few minutes to about 15 minutes. Spray bottles of the same sanitizers work in a pinch too, but I'll cover that later. If bottling solo, once the bottle is filled, place the cap on immediately, you don't have to crimp it just yet. Just letting it sit there with the cap on loose, can let excess air escape, which is a good thing. When you have your bottles lined up and filled, use the capper. Store in a room temperature room, with little to no light. Alternatively, after you've waited about a week after bottling, let it age a little in the fridge. Avoid over priming and excess temperature fluctuations, or your bottles will explode. You can use a little less recommended priming sugar and it will carbonate, it will just take a little longer.

Sanitizing: Can't stress this enough. Sanitize everything! Also, I highly recommend getting a spray bottle and either fill is with sanitizer or isopropyl alcohol. Before connecting any hoses, be sure to spray the ends of the hoses and any valves.

Hope this helps.
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:20 PM   #99
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Since sugar is dry,you don't have to worry about nasties too much,as they need air,food & warm moisture to propogate. I just boil 2C of water for a couple minutes,& stir the priming sugar in tillthe water goes clear again. Works fine with no problems.
And when the wort is boiled,o2 is driven off. So when it's chilled pour it through a fine mesh strainer to get the gunk out & aerate it a decent amount. I chill my wort to 75F,strain into Fv,then add chilled water to recipe volume & stir roughly at least 3 minutes to mix well & aerate a lil more. Take OG sample,pitch the yeast & seal it up. Aerating is good before the yeast is pitched to aid in the reproductive phase. It's after it starts fermenting or nearly done that aeration is bad.
The beer likely won't get infected at 160F plus,as pasteurization happens in seconds at 160F.

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Old 10-10-2013, 12:13 AM   #100
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Really great advice for a newbie like me, I somehow missed it at first but now found again.

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