Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Before I get started
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-18-2012, 11:44 AM   #1
jeff_brew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 9
Default Before I get started

Hi there,
first time post. I'm fairly surprised that it has taken me this long to get serious about home brew. I have always liked beer and am preparing to give it a shot.
I read a bit about brewing indoors or out. I guess the difference is that you can probably brew larger batches outdoors using a propane setup? The question I have is whether I could or should brew in the garage? My garage
has a separate area off to the side that I was thinking of turning into a man cave. The room after I wall it off with a door, has a big window in it which I could crack if venting is necessary. Could I run a propane setup in there safely, or is that a no-no? As it turns out, I have a large propane tank that feeds the gas fireplace just outside the wall of this room and could easily split a line off for brewing in that room.

Thoughts?

__________________
jeff_brew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-18-2012, 02:07 PM   #2
501irishred
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
501irishred's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Benton, Arkansas
Posts: 1,236
Liked 123 Times on 98 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

Sure you can brew in there!! Of course you may need to set fans, open door, and open/not just crack the window. Are your floors concrete in that room? I'd like to say nothing ever gets on the floor, but I'd be lying!

__________________
501irishred is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-18-2012, 03:21 PM   #3
Atonk
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 335
Liked 16 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

I brew in my garage when I can't brew outside. It's somewhat finished, and I have wood stove on the opposite side of the garage. I don't have fires going when I brew as a precaution, and usually crack a window and/or door. It can really get like a steam room in there, which is especially nice in the winter!

__________________
Atonk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-18-2012, 03:23 PM   #4
jeff_brew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 501irishred View Post
Sure you can brew in there!! Of course you may need to set fans, open door, and open/not just crack the window. Are your floors concrete in that room? I'd like to say nothing ever gets on the floor, but I'd be lying!
The floor is concrete at the moment. I intend to build a slightly raised floor which will go above the flood vents, so that I've got an actual indoor room. My house is built on raised floor and is pretty high off the ground. So, therefore my garage floor which is at ground level makes the garage ceiling very high up - on the order of fourteen feet or so.
I plan on walling this room off so that it's not part of the garage itself except via some exterior double doors leading into the garage. That's in case I or some future owner still want to use it to house a golf cart or tractor. I wanted to be able to cook the brew with the doors and perhaps window closed if possible. I guess you're saying that there needs to be a lot of ventilation. What if I had an exhaust fan set up just like normal kitchen ventilation? Could the window and doors be closed? I'm thinking about a cold day or bugs on a warm day. The darned no-seeums here in Savannah go through screens. Aside from the vapor produced, I'm a bit concerned about fire. I would not use a turkey burner. Is there some more heavy, stable platform that folks might use for indoor use?

Thanks,
__________________
jeff_brew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-18-2012, 04:08 PM   #5
jeff_brew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atonk View Post
I brew in my garage when I can't brew outside. It's somewhat finished, and I have wood stove on the opposite side of the garage. I don't have fires going when I brew as a precaution, and usually crack a window and/or door. It can really get like a steam room in there, which is especially nice in the winter!
Bear in mind that I have no experience at all when I ask this -
I thought you had to use a burner of some kind to make beer?
If so, how can you not have "fires going" when you cook in your
garage?
__________________
jeff_brew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-18-2012, 04:50 PM   #6
metanoia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Dearborn Heights, Michigan
Posts: 506
Liked 54 Times on 42 Posts
Likes Given: 99

Default

I believe Atonk means he doesn't have fires going at the same time as his brewing burners. I could see that possibly making it too hot in the garage, or at least altering known temperatures he's used to.

__________________
Homebrew Power - Sign up for our newsletter and receive a free ebook guide on how to break into homebrewing!
Fermenter: Empty :(
Bottled: Hefe-Vixen, Gingerbread Brown
On Deck: 60 Bells IPA [11/22 brewday]
Thinking about racking to a secondary? Read this first.
metanoia is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-19-2012, 03:52 AM   #7
501irishred
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
501irishred's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Benton, Arkansas
Posts: 1,236
Liked 123 Times on 98 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

When using open flame anything in an enclosed space, there are three "dangers" to avoid. Fire (of course), carbon monoxide, and asphyxiation. The later two can be solved by adequate ventilation (outgoing AND incoming air). Atonk was right on by not using the fireplace simultaneously with the burners if ventilation is minimal, as this could put additional CO in the air and use up more available oxygen. Asphyxiation is certainly a stretch for most residential construction situations (but possible), but CO poisoning is real, and fairly common. Get a CO detector for your room and use some common sense, and you should be fine to continue with your plans. They have some fairly inexpensive detectors that actually display parts per million of CO and could help you fine tune your room/system. Levels of say 3ppm may not engage a go/no go detector, but I would want to know so I could take steps to make sure it remained zero.

__________________
501irishred is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-19-2012, 04:28 AM   #8
jpeebs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Posts: 141
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 32

Default

I plan on brewing in my garage with my propane setup this winter. Once the snow hits, I'm gonna have to I think. Might feel nice with the heat, and I won't complain about the smell!

__________________
jpeebs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-19-2012, 11:59 AM   #9
jeff_brew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by metanoia View Post
I believe Atonk means he doesn't have fires going at the same time as his brewing burners. I could see that possibly making it too hot in the garage, or at least altering known temperatures he's used to.
Ok, makes sense. Thanks.
__________________
jeff_brew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-19-2012, 12:06 PM   #10
jeff_brew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 501irishred View Post
When using open flame anything in an enclosed space, there are three "dangers" to avoid. Fire (of course), carbon monoxide, and asphyxiation. The later two can be solved by adequate ventilation (outgoing AND incoming air). Atonk was right on by not using the fireplace simultaneously with the burners if ventilation is minimal, as this could put additional CO in the air and use up more available oxygen. Asphyxiation is certainly a stretch for most residential construction situations (but possible), but CO poisoning is real, and fairly common. Get a CO detector for your room and use some common sense, and you should be fine to continue with your plans. They have some fairly inexpensive detectors that actually display parts per million of CO and could help you fine tune your room/system. Levels of say 3ppm may not engage a go/no go detector, but I would want to know so I could take steps to make sure it remained zero.
Does brewing produce more CO than other forms of normal cooking? I'm trying to understand what the difference is from cooking on a gas stove in the kitchen. Or is it the use of propane that you're thinking will do that. I'm not even sure what I would use for the heat source. I mentioned that I have a propane tank very handy, but I don't have to use that. I'm open to suggestion.
I'm also curious how long a period of time the "cooking" will be. If it's only an hour or so, then it's not a big deal to open the window, but ideally I'd like to exhaust the fumes. I do plan on conditioning the air in that room with a separate source than the house hvac.
I'm editing this paragraph. I read up some on propane vs natural gas and propane burns pretty cleanly unless it's too rich, then it will produce CO. I see your general point now; just to be careful with open flame cooking. I agree it is a good idea to install a CO alarm and I will install adequate ventilation.
__________________

Reason: add'l info
jeff_brew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
You started. You stopped. You started again... Ize General Chit Chat 27 10-16-2014 05:08 PM
Just Getting Started! pigsnot Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 03-16-2011 09:09 PM
Help me get started rschoelman Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 06-17-2010 01:47 AM
can anyone tell me what i need to get started? sside49 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 06-30-2008 06:54 AM
Looking to get started zenlakin Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 12-15-2007 06:10 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS