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xiach 02-16-2013 12:17 AM

Beer not carbonated
 
I got a mr beer kit and made some beer. I refrigerated the bottles after 1 week of secondary fermentation as instructed. I tried one bottle and its still flat. Can I take them out of the fridge and keep fermenting? Or is it too late?

captwalt 02-16-2013 12:32 AM

I take it that you fermented in the lbk ( little brown keg), bottled your brew with the required amount of sugar, sealed them, and after 1 week you put them in thd fridge and....... Nothing. You can pull them out, bring them ip to about 70 degrees F, and wait 2 to three weeks to try another one. 4 weeks would be better.

Jeffinn 02-16-2013 01:01 AM

+1 to what captwalt says. You gotta warm them up to get the carbonation going.

RIC0 02-16-2013 11:44 AM

2 weeks minimum at room temp for good carbonation, could take longer. RDWHAHB

SteveM 02-16-2013 01:58 PM

...and if not done in two weeks, let them go longer. Even without the priming sugar, beers can carbonate to an acceptable level eventually (he said, after doing this once by mistake many years ago).

homebrewdad 02-16-2013 03:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveM (Post 4910193)
...and if not done in two weeks, let them go longer. Even without the priming sugar, beers can carbonate to an acceptable level eventually (he said, after doing this once by mistake many years ago).

How? Carbonation is made by CO2 production, a byproduct of fermentation. If gravity is stable, no more CO2 is produced.

That's why we add priming sugar, to kick off a mini fermentation. If your beer carbed up with no priming sugar, either (a) fermentation was not done, or (b) you had a very slow infection of a wild yeast or similar.

SteveM 02-16-2013 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebrewdad (Post 4910482)
How? Carbonation is made by CO2 production, a byproduct of fermentation. If gravity is stable, no more CO2 is produced.

That's why we add priming sugar, to kick off a mini fermentation. If your beer carbed up with no priming sugar, either (a) fermentation was not done, or (b) you had a very slow infection of a wild yeast or similar.

If 100% of the fermentables are consumed, then no more CO2 is produced. But that seldom happens, and unless you've Pasteurized your brew, it will continue to ferment, though very slowly.

I don't recommend it but having done it, I know it to be the case.

jflongo 02-16-2013 05:01 PM

And just to give you an idea on time. I bottled an Irish Stout on 1/22/2013. Tried one after a week, flat. Tried one after 2 weeks, flat. Just tried one last night, so 24 days later, and it had a nice head on it. I've had some beers take 3 or 4 days to carbonate, and as you can see this one took over 3 weeks.

I always give people this recommendation, and since you using Mr Beer it's even easier. After 3 or 4 days, give your bottle a light squeeze and see how hard it is. Do this every day or so. When it's at the point, where it's hard to squeeze, then you know it's carbonated. Then you can put it in the fridge. For other people that use glass bottles, you could still sanitize 1 soda plastic 12 or 16oz bottle and use that same strategy.

RIC0 02-19-2013 02:16 PM

I have a red ale that sat for 3 weeks cracked one open and it was as flat as can be. All other beers I brew age in the same room and are ready to drink at 3 weeks. Brought in a few bottles to work and put in a drawer as it's warmer than my storage room. They are carbed up now so why these needed the higher temp over others I"m not sure. I also made this same batch 3 months ago and had no issues.

SteveM 02-19-2013 03:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RIC0 (Post 4920262)
I have a red ale that sat for 3 weeks cracked one open and it was as flat as can be. All other beers I brew age in the same room and are ready to drink at 3 weeks. Brought in a few bottles to work and put in a drawer as it's warmer than my storage room. They are carbed up now so why these needed the higher temp over others I"m not sure. I also made this same batch 3 months ago and had no issues.

Other than my "test bottles," three weeks is about my bare minimum for allowing beers to carbonate.

Keep in mind that the yeast may become inactive, but a bit of gentle agitation of the bottles (moving them from one location to another was certainly enough) and warmer temperatures (but not too warm) will stir up some additional fermentation - et voila, carbonation.


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