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Old 04-24-2010, 03:16 PM   #1
MatthewTCranford
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Default Please Help With Wheat Extract Brew! SOOO Close

MOD EDIT: multiple threads merged. Please do not double/triple/quadruple post.

These are the ingredients I was given at my local home brew store to make an american wheat extract brew. I have been brewing with the true brew kits and now i'm a little confused without a set of directions in front of me:

-6lbs Dry Malt Extract Bavarian Wheat
-1lb victory grain
-1lb wheat
-1oz bittering
-1oz finishing

Do i steep the grain and wheat like i would a specialty grain? then do the boil with the dry malt extract? Please Help!

Also, they said to add half the bittering hops for 60 min, then half for another 30. then for the finishing hops to do half for 15 and half for five... does this mean i will be boiling for an hour and 50 minutes?

Please help! Thanks!
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Old 04-24-2010, 03:17 PM   #2
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Default Extract Wheat Help! Got ingredients, need help with the procedure!

These are the ingredients I was given at my local home brew store to make an american wheat extract brew. I have been brewing with the true brew kits and now i'm a little confused without a set of directions in front of me:

-6lbs Dry Malt Extract Bavarian Wheat
-1lb victory grain
-1lb wheat
-1oz bittering
-1oz finishing

Do i steep the grain and wheat like i would a specialty grain? then do the boil with the dry malt extract? Please Help!

Also, they said to add half the bittering hops for 60 min, then half for another 30. then for the finishing hops to do half for 15 and half for five... does this mean i will be boiling for an hour and 50 minutes?

Please help! Thanks!

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Old 04-24-2010, 03:21 PM   #3
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Whatever grain you have, you'll be steeping it all together. Do the instructions say to steep or mash? What temp does it say to do it at? They are different processes and not really interchangeable. After the steeping/mashing is done you move on to the boil phase with the extract.

As for the hops, no, you aren't boiling for nearly 2 hours. The boil should be 60 minutes. You'll add half the bittering hops as soon as you get to a boil and then after 30 minutes have passed you'll add the other half. Then after 45 minutes have passed you'll add half the finishing hops, and then at the 55 minute mark you'll add the last.

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Old 04-24-2010, 03:29 PM   #4
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You need to do a partial mash.

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Old 04-24-2010, 03:35 PM   #5
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Steep the grains at 150 degrees for 30 min. in about a gal. and a half of water. You will only need to boil 1 hour total.
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Old 04-24-2010, 04:11 PM   #6
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Heat 3 quarts of water to 165 degrees. Take off the heat, and add your grains. (it's best if the grains are loosely placed in a grain bag, not too tight). Stir well, to thoroughly wet the grains and then check the temperature. If you're between 150 and 155, you're golden! Cover it, and let sit at that temperature for 45 minutes. In the meantime, heat a gallon of water up to 170 degrees in a separate pot. After the 45 minutes is up, lift up the grain bag out of the liquid, and place it over the brew pot in a colander. Pour the 170 degree water gently over the grainbag to "rinse" it well. Throw the grains away.

Bring that resulting liquid up to a boil, adding more water to get up to your boil volume (how big is your pot?). Take off the heat and add your extract. Place back on the burner and bring to a boil. When it's boiling, add the first hops and set the timer for 60 minutes. Add the rest of the hops at the appropriate time. So, if you have 15 minute hops, for example, add them when 15 minutes is left on the timer. When the timer hits 0, turn off the heat and cool the wort.

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Old 04-24-2010, 07:27 PM   #7
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The hop additions, as Willy said, are for a 60 minute boil.

But just to clarify, think about starting a countdown timer from 60 minutes. Add your first hops and start the timer. After 30 minutes, when the clock reads 30, add the next addition. After 15 more minutes, when the clock has 15 minutes left, you add .5oz of finishing hops. And then 10 minutes later, with 5 to go, you add the remaining finishing hops. Boil for 5 more minutes, and cool down the wort quickly!

Also, if you have a smaller pot, that'd be best for the steeping the grains (It's actually a partial mash, as you have wheat malt and victory in there, both with diastatic power!). While you're waiting around while the grains steep, you can start heating up another 2 gallons of water in your brew pot, and start to dissolve the DME. Once your grains are done steeping, drain the bag, and add the water from the smaller pot to your brew kettle and bring it to a boil before you add your first hops.

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Old 04-24-2010, 10:56 PM   #8
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Default Extract Cooking temperature. Conflicting Information HELP!

Just brewed an extract wheat beer. This was not a kit. Ingredients put together by a staff member of my local home brewing store. The instructions I received from them and from this website was when adding the extracts and hops, keep the temperature at 150 def F throughout the process.

I am now brewing the last True Brew kit that I had. It's a Nut brown ale. It's directions are to keep it boiling throughout that process. Which is the correct way? and which should i use for the nut brown ale?

(with my wheat beer, i have ton of sediment in the bottom of my carboy. I plan to do a secondary frementation, but the topmost layer of sediment looks thinner and more homogeneous. Could this be sugar that did not disolve in my wort? any input would be greatly appreciated.)

Thanks!

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Old 04-24-2010, 11:09 PM   #9
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Default Batch Down! Help Needed! Save my wheat beer!

I steeped my grains at 150. However, I failed to bring to and maintain a boil during the addition of hops and malt extracts. I thought I was supposed to keep it at 150 the entire time. I cooled the wort, poured into the carboy, and added the yeast. After about 4 hours, no fermentation is taking place. There is a lot of sediment in the bottom of may carboy (4-5 inches). The top layer of sediment is very homogeneous and looks like it could be sugar that did not disolve all the way possibly? I'm thinking since I did not bring to a boil that i was unable to saturate all of the sugar? Can this happen? Is it savable? Please Please Please help! Thanks!

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Old 04-24-2010, 11:10 PM   #10
MatthewTCranford
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Default Batch Down! Help Needed! Save my wheat beer!

Made a mistake making my american wheat beer.

I steeped my grains at 150. However, I failed to bring to and maintain a boil during the addition of hops and malt extracts. I thought I was supposed to keep it at 150 the entire time. I cooled the wort, poured into the carboy, and added the yeast. After about 4 hours, no fermentation is taking place. There is a lot of sediment in the bottom of may carboy (4-5 inches). The top layer of sediment is very homogeneous and looks like it could be sugar that did not disolve all the way possibly? I'm thinking since I did not bring to a boil that i was unable to saturate all of the sugar? Can this happen? Is it savable? Please Please Please help! Thanks!

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