Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Attenuation/Mouthfeel/sweetness

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-18-2013, 03:19 AM   #1
kontrol
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 198
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default Attenuation/Mouthfeel/sweetness

I finished my first beer, bottled it 3 days ago (Still resisting to taste one at the moment). I tasted my (flat, warm/hot) beer before bottling and I must admit that it was a lot more attenuated than I expected.

I brew with extract and steep grains. Yet since I'm just learning I'm not quite ready to move to partial/all grain.

My beer was 1,046 OG and 1,013 FG. There is about 1lb and 12oz of crystal/chocolate (all together) in my 6GAL batch. Pitched WLP005 yeast and fermented at 68F room temperature the whole time.

1. How can I scale up the mouthfeel of my beer?
2. How do I increase the residual sweetness? Do I try to go for a higher OG and use less attenuative yeast? More non-fermenticible sugar?
3. I don't know what to expect yet as it's my first experience, but will my carbonated beer taste more sweet and have a higher mouthfeel than the non carbonated warm beer I tasted? It tasted... dull.
4. How do I give the sweet mouthfeel that some porter have? Molasse? Is it the only way?

I suppose that mouthfeel and sweetness in the beer are probably highly related. I'm searching for way to control them individually and together is what I ask is possible.

__________________
kontrol is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 03:32 AM   #2
badlee
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Thailand, Chiang mai,Thailand
Posts: 1,274
Liked 64 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

I dont use this method,but I would think that steeping some flaked wheat/oats and changing your yeast to one that attenuates less would do the trick.
I see from the wlp site that 005 can hit 74%, so if you go for something that maxes out at,say 78-70% then you will be ok.

__________________
badlee is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 03:47 AM   #3
helibrewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
helibrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 3,137
Liked 183 Times on 167 Posts
Likes Given: 42

Default

What style beer did you brew? Almost 2 pounds of non-fermentables with an OG of 1.046 seems like a lot of unfermentable sugar. Once it's carbed it will taste a lot different...the CO2 cuts some of the sweetness.

There's a difference in the sweetness from crystal malt and the sweetness from lower attenuated base malt.

__________________
Something is always fermenting....
"It's Bahl Hornin'"

Primary:
Brite Tank/Lagering:
Kegged: Hefeweizen, Chocolate Hazelnut Porter, Kumquat Saison, Tart Cherry Cider, Belgian Tripel, Maibock Bock, Ommegang Abbey Ale Clone, Belgian Golden Strong, German Pils (WLP830)
Bottled: Belgian Quad (Grand Reserve), Derangement (Belgian Dark Strong)
On Deck:
My Site: www.restlesscellars.com
helibrewer is offline
NordeastBrewer77 Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 04:38 AM   #4
kontrol
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 198
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Its an english brown ale

__________________
kontrol is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 04:54 AM   #5
helibrewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
helibrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 3,137
Liked 183 Times on 167 Posts
Likes Given: 42

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kontrol View Post
Its an english brown ale
Take good notes about what you think of the taste now. When it's carbed do the taste test again and compare to your green beer taste. Taking good tasting notes is the best way to tweak a recipe. I think you did everything right for an English Brown, no you just need to sit tight until you can compare the carbed version.
__________________
Something is always fermenting....
"It's Bahl Hornin'"

Primary:
Brite Tank/Lagering:
Kegged: Hefeweizen, Chocolate Hazelnut Porter, Kumquat Saison, Tart Cherry Cider, Belgian Tripel, Maibock Bock, Ommegang Abbey Ale Clone, Belgian Golden Strong, German Pils (WLP830)
Bottled: Belgian Quad (Grand Reserve), Derangement (Belgian Dark Strong)
On Deck:
My Site: www.restlesscellars.com
helibrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 12:07 PM   #6
kontrol
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 198
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Yeah I'm waiting until I can drink it. I feel it will be on the dry side. But let's see

My other questions on how to increase mouthfeel and sweetness remains. For further recipe I'd like to know how I can control these.

__________________
kontrol is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 12:45 PM   #7
helibrewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
helibrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 3,137
Liked 183 Times on 167 Posts
Likes Given: 42

Default

Crystal malt will add sweetness and higher mash temps will increase nonfermentables which increases mouthfeel, and body, but not necessarily sweetness.

Carapils malts as well as wheat and flaked oats will also increase body. Lactose is used to make sweet stouts since it is an unfermentable sugar.

Think of your extract as the fermentable portion and the steeping grains as the color, flavor, body piece.

This is a pretty good reference for what each of the grains/sugars contribute:
Grain List

__________________
Something is always fermenting....
"It's Bahl Hornin'"

Primary:
Brite Tank/Lagering:
Kegged: Hefeweizen, Chocolate Hazelnut Porter, Kumquat Saison, Tart Cherry Cider, Belgian Tripel, Maibock Bock, Ommegang Abbey Ale Clone, Belgian Golden Strong, German Pils (WLP830)
Bottled: Belgian Quad (Grand Reserve), Derangement (Belgian Dark Strong)
On Deck:
My Site: www.restlesscellars.com
helibrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 01:21 PM   #8
unionrdr
Wannabe author
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
unionrdr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Sheffield, Ohio
Posts: 28,496
Liked 1925 Times on 1693 Posts
Likes Given: 1426

Default

Maltodextrin is usually used to increase mouth feel. Can add a certain creaminess as wel. Lactose is milk sugar,typically used in milk stouts.
__________________
Everything works if ya let it-Roady(meatloaf)
My new book is on Amazon Kindle! http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L3MCU0W
unionrdr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 01:39 PM   #9
kontrol
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 198
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by helibrewer View Post
Crystal malt will add sweetness and higher mash temps will increase nonfermentables which increases mouthfeel, and body, but not necessarily sweetness.

Carapils malts as well as wheat and flaked oats will also increase body. Lactose is used to make sweet stouts since it is an unfermentable sugar.

Think of your extract as the fermentable portion and the steeping grains as the color, flavor, body piece.

This is a pretty good reference for what each of the grains/sugars contribute:
Grain List
How do I know in Beersmith grain list what is the portion of fermentable/unfermentable sugar?

And I can increase the temp of my steep to extract more unfermentable sugar? Or does it only work in a mash? I'm talking about steep grains like crystal.
__________________
kontrol is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 01:46 PM   #10
NordeastBrewer77
NBA Playa
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 7 reviews
 
NordeastBrewer77's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Posts: 7,933
Liked 1075 Times on 783 Posts
Likes Given: 3977

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kontrol View Post
How do I know in Beersmith grain list what is the portion of fermentable/unfermentable sugar?

And I can increase the temp of my steep to extract more unfermentable sugar? Or does it only work in a mash? I'm talking about steep grains like crystal.
Basically, no, you can't increase/decrease fermentables in a steep. You're basically just rinsing existing sugars from the grains, that's it. As for sweetness and mouthfeel in an extract brew, that's not normally going to be an issue. IME, extract beers seldom, if ever, over attenuate.
As for your beer, 1.013 is going to give you plenty of body and mouthfeel. There will also be some residual sweetness there. It will come across much differently when carbed.
A great tip that I can give you is that your warm, flat beer (or warm, flat beer in general) comes across thin, watery and bland. Carbonation will add to the feel of the beer and allow the flavors to come out. RDW, and wait a few weeks, you won't be worried about sweetness or body once this beer is carbed.
__________________
The Polk Street Brewery

Brewin' 'n' Que'n - YouTube Shenanigans

Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
can i drink this? I mean. Im gunna. But is it fine?
Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
it's not a barley wine. it's an ale.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlebomber View Post
Have you seen the price of ketchup lately? And I'm not talking Heinz.
NordeastBrewer77 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mouthfeel, mouthfeel, mouthfeel PhineasJWhoopie All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 9 02-05-2013 05:49 PM
Low attenuation and no sweetness smizak Fermentation & Yeast 5 12-26-2009 11:57 AM
Need more mouthfeel PavlovsCat All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 9 04-09-2009 04:49 PM
Got the mouthfeel I was looking for :) Matt Up North General Beer Discussion 6 02-18-2009 03:53 PM
Mouthfeel tigerface Recipes/Ingredients 1 10-25-2008 04:41 AM