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Old 08-01-2013, 04:33 PM   #1
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Default All-grain recipes

As I'm waiting for my first brew to be finished in the bottle, I'm looking at recipe kits for the next one. I feel like I read somewhere that all-grain recipes require some different techniques and equipment from what I received in first kit. (This first one I brewed used malt extract and hop pellets.) Is this true? I'm only doing one-gallon batches at this point and some of the "(sm)All Grain Recipe Kits" listed on AHS look interesting.

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Old 08-01-2013, 04:57 PM   #2
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Yes. All-grain requires that you have a way to mash the grains. Usually most people use a cooler to achieve this. You'll then need to sparge the grains, and the rest is as easy as boiling, adding hops, and cooling. Honestly, if you can make oatmeal you can do all-grain. Check out the all-grain section. I went all-grain for about $100 in equipment to start out.

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Old 08-01-2013, 04:59 PM   #3
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Yes.

All grains require that you extract the sugars from the malt grains directly. This requires a different technique called mashing which involves soaking the grains in hot water and then rinsing and extracting your wort from the residual sugar waters. A different technique then adding syrup/sugar to water.

Once you get the worty sugar water, boiling it and adding hops is *exactly* the same though.

There are equipment, called a mash tun, dedicated to mashing but there are methods using simple equipment such as a grain sack and a method could Boil In A Bag (BIAB) in which you, er, boil in a bag.

Brooklyn Brew Shop specialises is 1 gallon all-grain ingredient kits using a pasta pot and a metal strainer and stove top mashing. Heres an example of a recipe they have which describes stovetop mashing. (Although I don't get the "consistancy of oatmeal" business. Mashed grains in my experience *never* have the consistancy of oatmeal.)

But you'll probably want to read up an "real" mashing or BIAB.

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Old 08-01-2013, 05:43 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Darwin18 View Post
Yes. All-grain requires that you have a way to mash the grains. Usually most people use a cooler to achieve this. You'll then need to sparge the grains, and the rest is as easy as boiling, adding hops, and cooling. Honestly, if you can make oatmeal you can do all-grain. Check out the all-grain section. I went all-grain for about $100 in equipment to start out.
I went from extract to all grain for about $5.

I bought a nylon bag and starting doing BIAB.
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Old 08-01-2013, 05:46 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by woozy
using simple equipment such as a grain sack and a method could Boil In A Bag (BIAB) in which you, er, boil in a bag.

.
I believe the term is brew in a bag. You do not want to boil your grains. You only want to mash them at around 150F.
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Old 08-01-2013, 06:00 PM   #6
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I went from extract to all grain for about $5.

I bought a nylon bag and starting doing BIAB.
I'm talking about traditional mashing, not BIAB. For that you'd need a cooler, a conversion kit for the cooler, a chiller, and likely a bigger pot than what you start out with extract brewing. That's usually up around $100.
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Old 08-01-2013, 06:44 PM   #7
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I'm talking about traditional mashing, not BIAB. For that you'd need a cooler, a conversion kit for the cooler, a chiller, and likely a bigger pot than what you start out with extract brewing. That's usually up around $100.
Right... but my point is that you can go to an all-grain method for less than $100.

BIAB vs. "traditional" brewing is talked about ad nauseum here... but it's nice to point out the options to newbies.
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Old 08-01-2013, 06:49 PM   #8
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Right... but my point is that you can go to an all-grain method for less than $100.

BIAB vs. "traditional" brewing is talked about ad nauseum here... but it's nice to point out the options to newbies.
True. I like to give out advice with methods that I have experience with.
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Old 08-01-2013, 06:49 PM   #9
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I believe the term is brew in a bag. You do not want to boil your grains. You only want to mash them at around 150F.
D'oh!!!! I knew that! I need my *COFFEE*!!!

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I'm talking about traditional mashing, not BIAB. For that you'd need a cooler, a conversion kit for the cooler, a chiller, and likely a bigger pot than what you start out with extract brewing. That's usually up around $100.
I think the point was that all-grain need not be expensive. BIAB is a cheap and legitimate way to do all-grain. And for a one gallon batch you don't need the bag-- just a strainer (although a grain bag is nice).
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Old 08-01-2013, 06:56 PM   #10
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If you are only doing 1 gallon batches, you probably have all the equipment on hand to do all grain. Most of the cost of all-grain startup is due to the increased volumes - eg 7 gallons+ of wort to do a 5 gallon batch. You need big kettles and some way to mash and sparge a good chunk of grain and then some way to cool it. For a 1 gallon batch, you could just use a couple cheapo grain bag, mash right in a pot, and just let the bag drain in a colander. The only real trick would be keeping the temp in the correct range with a small volume. The easiest thing would probably be to preheat you over and then just toss the whole pot in there. That should hold temps close for an hour pretty well.

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