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Old 06-20-2013, 01:33 AM   #1
SteelPeat
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Default With all this cold break, will my beer be cloudy?

I'm trying to make a nice clear lawn mower ale but after I cooled, there was so much cold break. I whirlpooled and siphoned but it all got sucked in. My question is, will it settle in the primary?

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Old 06-20-2013, 01:56 AM   #2
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Yes. Just give it plenty of time. I've fermented directly in my kettle for several dozen batches with all the break material still in it. It'll still clear.

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Old 06-20-2013, 06:02 AM   #3
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Actually cod break improves clarity, that is why it is recommended to rapidly cool the wort.
It will eventually settle on the bottom.

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Old 06-20-2013, 11:15 AM   #4
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Yep what was said above. Both the Hot and Cold breaks help make the compounds that cause haziness to coagulate together so that they can and will fall out of suspension. Just do not stir or jostle the fermenter during fermentation, give it at least 2 weeks of fermentation and when you transfer to your bottling bucket rack from over top of the trub cake (watch your autosiphon or siphon hose and lift it up if you see the beer being transferred getting hazy(means it is sucking up yeast/trub). Also chill your bottles for a couple days(week) before drinking which will help clear the rest out.

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Old 06-20-2013, 12:28 PM   #5
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Thanks you guys. I used whirfloc in it and am using S-04 yeast, which flocculates really well (its the only one I can get readily in Korea). I am hoping it cakes really well at the bottom.

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Old 06-20-2013, 01:44 PM   #6
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It'll definitely clear up on its own, particularly with Whirlfloc - it always gets the job done for me. But, for some reason, if it does seem a bit hazy when it hits the secondary, you can throw in some Gelatin or Biofine for fining purposes - just a little extra insurance against haziness!

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Old 06-20-2013, 02:52 PM   #7
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If you have the equipment to do so, cold crash it to 35-36*F 4-5 days prior to bottling. That will promote the settling of suspended material, clear the beer nicely and really compact/firm the bottom trub.
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Old 06-21-2013, 12:22 AM   #8
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A lot of cold break mush can be a symptom of highly bicarbonate water that's not treated. Creating poor mash pH, causing starch not to gelatinize by the alpha enzymes. If you had a good boil and the mash and wort pH was in the park and the wort was cooled pretty quick. It is a condition caused by a brewing problem. Stirring mash to death and running off the starch, stirred into solution, through a poor filter bed or no filter bed, low boil, a poor hot break, slow wort cooling. Rack the wort off the mush, before it goes into the fermenter. The mush gives beer bitter, astringincy, some confuse with hop bitterness. Less noticeable in beer with a lot of black. In a light beer, you should rack the beer off the stuff.

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Old 06-22-2013, 04:19 AM   #9
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Unfortunately I don't have the equipment to cold crash. The best I can do is keep it in my air conditioned room with the A/C cranked. I will let you know in a week and a half whether or not it all settled i a nice trub cake.
I am also thinking that a week after bottling I should put all the beers in my refrigerator for an addition week to prevent esters from being created and giving off flavours.

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Old 06-22-2013, 04:36 AM   #10
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A beer that's been bottled generally won't be putting out any more esters as they're produced mainly during initial fermentation. If anything, room temperature conditioning for an ale helps to reduce off flavors, the main benefit of cold storing an ale is to improve clarity.

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