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Old 07-01-2008, 09:31 AM   #1
Mr. Awesome
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Default aerating the wort

is something like this
http://www.northernbrewer.com/pics/fullsize/mixstir.jpg

useable to aerate the wort prior to pitching yeast, or is it something else entirely? I've heard of people using oxygen stones, with oxygen canisters, but I've used this with some positive results.

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Old 07-01-2008, 11:04 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Awesome View Post
is something like this
http://www.northernbrewer.com/pics/fullsize/mixstir.jpg

useable to aerate the wort prior to pitching yeast, or is it something else entirely? I've heard of people using oxygen stones, with oxygen canisters, but I've used this with some positive results.
Those work, anything that agitates the wort. I personally shake mine up by rocking the carboy like mad. Stones work also, but really don't aerate as quick as some want to believe, not unless your using pure oxygen. Someone had a scientific eval on all the methods comparing how much dissolved oxygen ended up in the wort. I was happy to find out my shake / rocking method works just fine unless I go with an oxygen setup.
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Old 07-01-2008, 11:53 AM   #3
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This is good, I haven't seen a discussion on this in awhile. I let the chilled wort fall into the carboy from the top. This creates a lot of foaming but at least I know its getting a little oxygen in there. Then I shake like mad. Basic Brewing Radio did a show on this I think and they found out that shaking really doesn't do anything. But I don't really care because I make good beer and don't want to spend the money on more equipment right now. (actually I do want to spend the money I just shouldn't).

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Old 07-01-2008, 01:00 PM   #4
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Wyeast lab oxygenation chart
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Old 07-01-2008, 01:04 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by jcarson83 View Post
This is good, I haven't seen a discussion on this in awhile. I let the chilled wort fall into the carboy from the top. This creates a lot of foaming but at least I know its getting a little oxygen in there. Then I shake like mad. Basic Brewing Radio did a show on this I think and they found out that shaking really doesn't do anything. But I don't really care because I make good beer and don't want to spend the money on more equipment right now. (actually I do want to spend the money I just shouldn't).
+1 I have seen a noticeable difference in my beer by letting my wort fall about 3' into the bucket from my counter flow chiller. Lets just say I get enough foam that in a ale pale I have to push the foam down with the lid if I have 5 gallons in there.
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Old 07-01-2008, 01:15 PM   #6
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+1 I have seen a noticeable difference in my beer by letting my wort fall about 3' into the bucket from my counter flow chiller. Lets just say I get enough foam that in a ale pale I have to push the foam down with the lid if I have 5 gallons in there.
That is similar to my aeration method as well. I pour my cooled wort (I use an immersion chiller) through a strainer into my bottling bucket; then with my Ale Pail on the floor and the bottling bucket on the counter, I open the spigot and let the wort fall a few feet through a strainer and into the primary. I fully expect all of my beers to take off in <4 hours, and they always do.
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Old 07-01-2008, 01:21 PM   #7
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If you don't do a complete boil, then you should not worry too much about this aeration. Just get your stirrer spoon and do a 3-5 minutes vigourous stir.

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Old 07-01-2008, 01:32 PM   #8
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For high-gravity brews I use O2 through a stone, but for "normal" gravity ones I aerate by running it through the airlock...the piece at the bottom of it breaks apart the stream into 4 streams and aerates the bejesus out of it. Get lots of foam in the fermenter and I can keep the lid on (not sealed, to let displaced air escape), means one less thing to touch the wort.



This, of course, I don't do without pitching the proper amount of healthy yeast. Always, every time.

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Old 07-01-2008, 01:41 PM   #9
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I just bought one of those mix/stir rods a couple of months ago, and it seems to work ok. I can't say that I've seen any improvement over shaking the Carboy, but it sure is easier to use!

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Old 07-01-2008, 02:40 PM   #10
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My only thought looking at that rod is that it looks awfully sharp on the ends. I wouldn't want to be using that on my plastic fermenter in case I introduced scratches to it.

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