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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Advice sought: (still) fermenting in secondary with dry hops
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Old 07-26-2012, 04:49 PM   #1
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Default Advice sought: (still) fermenting in secondary with dry hops

So I racked my IPA to secondary for dry-hopping with an ounce or cascade and maybe 3/4oz of citra. It had been in primary for ten days at 66 degrees with california ale yeast, was at around 66% apparent attenuation and had minor airlock activity - I was betting on its finishing up any remaining fermentation fairly quickly. In any case, I had some time to rack and dryhop it and my schedule has been rough, so I seized it. And yes, I suppose it could go without saying that, like many newer brewers without a robust pipeline and full fridge, I have patience issues to work through

Coming on two weeks in secondary, and I just counted 7 bubbles per min in the airlock! Was counting on being able to bottle this weekend . I have read about grassy and otherwise undesirable aroma and flavor characteristics that come with leaving beer on the hops for too long, so I am wondering whether I should rack the beer off the hops into another carboy this weekend, or just leave it be another week. I am loathe to rack and thus oxygenate the stuff if I don't need to, but also hate to leave it on the hops for another week if this would negatively impact the flavor.

What would you do in this situation?

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Old 07-26-2012, 04:53 PM   #2
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If you are dry hopping, I've heard it is best only to let it sit for a week, otherwise you can start losing the aroma characteristics and IPAs are better young. Secondly, one thing you'll see a lot on here is that airlock bubbles don't mean a thing. Your brew could just be outgassing, not a big deal. Take a gravity reading, it's the only way to be sure. If it's stable, your good to go regardless of airlock activity!

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Old 07-26-2012, 04:57 PM   #3
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Take a gravity reading.

Bubbles only mean gas is present, not fermentation. It's common knowledge that dry hopping will sometimes off-gas the beer, causing the air lock to move.

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Old 07-26-2012, 05:00 PM   #4
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Stop counting bubbles, unless you need practice counting. HYDROMETER dude.

10 days is plenty for that yeast, your process is great thus far. Leave it, don't rack again. Bottle when you have the time. +/- a few days won't give you grassy.

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Old 07-26-2012, 05:11 PM   #5
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That's a good point. Is it common to experience that much gas coming off of a beer without significant fermentation activity? I figured that, barring changes in temperature or agitation, I would not still be seeing that much. I currently ferment in a small wine cabinet with carboys and bottles puzzled together in a precarious jumble, so while the temp is stable and there is minimal vibration, it's quite a production to extricate anything for a simple gravity reading. One more reason I need a chest freezer!

I will take the advice and take a reading... Hoping I can bottle this weekend. Thanks for the advice!

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Old 07-26-2012, 05:12 PM   #6
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Just read the response about dry hopping and off gassing. Noted. Thanks!

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Old 07-26-2012, 05:15 PM   #7
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Quick follow up. If the dry hops can bring CO2 out of suspension at a greater rate, is it enough for me to need to adjust my priming sugar from what suggested on calculators?

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Old 07-26-2012, 05:19 PM   #8
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No, I would follow through on normal priming. The priming rate is more a function of the available yeast left than what CO2 is already dissolved.

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