Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > About to buy my first setup
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-25-2014, 06:29 AM   #21
Matticus_Tarp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 5
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

The stout doesn't taste like a 512 Pecan Porter like I had hoped, but hey, it's got the strong dark taste I love.

__________________
Matticus_Tarp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-25-2014, 06:45 AM   #22
kaconga
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Rathdrum, Idaho
Posts: 966
Liked 136 Times on 104 Posts
Likes Given: 47

Default

Definitely on the right track! Temp control is number one thing most brewers need to do. A chest freezer takes all the guess work out of it. If you haven't then I suggest "how to brew" for the most comprehensive homebrewing book I have seen. Welcome to the obsession

__________________
kaconga is offline
Newsman Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-25-2014, 07:38 PM   #23
MindenMan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Carson City, Nv
Posts: 1,637
Liked 234 Times on 176 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

If you are not a DYI guy,you can purchase a Johnson controller, but it will only control cooling, not heating and cooling. The STC-1000 is a well known and used controller by members of this site. The STC-1000 will control both heat and cooling, and are available through Flea-Bay, and Amazon for less than $30.00. If you find a used Turkey fryer setup for approximately $20.00, the pot it comes with (usually 30qt), is big enough for any beginner IMO. When you decide to purchase a larger a larger pot, the burner can still be used and has plenty of heat available, even with a 15 gallon pot. At that point you have a $50.00 equivalent burner and a free pot. I still use my turkey fryer with a 10 gallon pot, a 5psi regulator, and I have never run it wide open heat. Granted, that burner doesn't bring water or wort to a boil in less than 10 minutes, but I don't care, as I use between 3 and 3-1/2 pounds of propane for a full boil 5 gallon batch.

__________________
MindenMan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-25-2014, 10:20 PM   #24
MB331
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 30
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin79 View Post
You have just opened the door and let in the flood lol. Ask 100 home brewers what to purchase to get started in home brewing and you undoubtedly get 100 different answers. What you buy depends largely on your budget and how serious you plan to get into home brewing. Of course, the catch is, no one really knows how serious they are going to get until they at least brew their first few batches. There are many of us that wished they would have simply bought x,y,z right away instead of upgrading to it later. But hindsight is 20/20, and I can personally tell you that if someone told me that I had to buy everything I have accumulated over the past 2 years right at the start, I might not have a hobby in home brewing. I think your best bet is to decide whether you will be brewing inside on a stove, or outside on a burner. If you are brewing inside, then a standard 5 gallon starter kit such as those from northern brewer, morebeer, Midwest, or any of the mainstream homebrew suppliers will be adequate to get you started. They won't break your budget, and you will have infinite avenues to expand later on. If you can commit to brewing outside, you may want to look into getting a kettle larger than 5 gallons (at least 10 gallons). This will give you the ability to do full boils and make it easier to do all grain when you are ready
Well said. My only suggestion would to get PET carboys (fun to observe fermentation and the price is right) and bomber bottles instead of the 12 ouncers (capping 48 bottles per batch is not fun).
__________________
MB331 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-29-2014, 07:06 AM   #25
Matticus_Tarp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 5
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Are bomber bottles the flip top grolsch looking bottles?

__________________
Matticus_Tarp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-29-2014, 11:00 AM   #26
Riot
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 494
Liked 49 Times on 46 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Nope, bombers are regular crown cap bottles at about 24 oz. A turkey fryer is a good investment. It will be a workable pot until you start to upscale and I know the burner that came with mine is powerful enough for a 15 gallon kettle.

__________________
Riot is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-29-2014, 11:12 AM   #27
Thompson8816
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 50
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

just brewed my first batch this past weekend of an IPA. Turned out great! Started small so I can gain some experience before spending a lot of $$$ on 5 gallon equipment and ingredients. I would hate to go spend all the money and just ruin beer because of the lack of experience!! Anyways this is what I bought and it wasnt expensive at all.
1 Gal carboi (might as well get the ale pale)
bottle siphone
siphone tubing
Bottle caps
bottle capper
Sanitizer
stopper
airlock

__________________
Thompson8816 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-29-2014, 11:34 AM   #28
ChelisHubby
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 317
Liked 37 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 141

Default

Thompson just keep it cool when you ferment with it for the first 3 or 4 days use a bucket with water and Iced plastic bottles if you can check the water temp you want to try for 65 degrees as this is the middle range of where most yeast like to ferment. Enjoy your Pale Ale as it is Summer!

__________________
ChelisHubby is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-29-2014, 11:58 AM   #29
eadavis80
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 263
Liked 17 Times on 13 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

I am 10 extract batches in. I have never purchased any temp control devices and I don't think my beers have been anything short of good. Would I like to down the road? Sure, but there are other things I am glad I have instead.

Here are the essentials:

1. 6.5 gallon primary bucket - the cheapest place to let your beer ferment - about $16
2. A spoon - metal or plastic to stir ingredients - less than $5
3. An airlock - a little piece of plastic that helps you gauge Co2 release during fermentation - $1.50
4. A kettle. Bigger is better, but starting with a 5 gallon stainless steel kettle is fine for a beginner. You can find these online for $20. I would not use this kettle for any other cooking. I kept mine exclusively for beer only.
5. A bottling bucket - you'll transfer your fermented beer into this other bucket on bottling day
6. A bottle capper - used to cap your freshly bottled beers
7. Tubing - used to transport the beer from the primary bucket to the bottling bucket on bottling day.
8. Auto siphon - see descriptor for no. 7
9. Thermometer - essential to keep water and wort at certain temps at various stages
10. Hydrometer - While not "essential" for a beginner, it's the only way to really know if fermentation is complete. That being said, 95% of beers you'll do as a beginner will be done fermenting if you just let them sit in the primary for 2 weeks.
11. OxyClean - Some will say always buy BPW or some other home brewing CLEANER, but I find OxyClean works fine and is cheaper. I've never had any infections.
12. Sanitizer - Oxy Clean works to CLEAN your equipment, but a sanitizer like StarSan or Iodophor is truly essential to keep bacteria from contaminating your batch.

This would be fine to start: http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/b...arter-kit.html

Later on, you might want to get a BIGGER kettle to do full volume boils, meaning instead of adding 2.5 gallons of water to your wort, you'll boil all the wort together. You'll also want to add a wort chiller because doing ice baths is cheap and easy, but it's also annoying and slow. Wort chillers will cool your wort a lot faster.

Yeast starter kits and stir plates would also be something to look at, though I myself have not done either and I'm 10 batches in. I either just pitch the WYeast Smack Pack directly into the wort or pitch dry yeast (cheaper and you get more yeast cells).

AS you can see, brewing is like any hobby. It's cheap to get started and make good beer. However, if you're like most, you'll just continue to add to your resources with time and experience.

__________________
eadavis80 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bad Ass Setup! mateo27 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 03-22-2012 02:40 PM
My AG setup... billy915 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 8 11-17-2010 02:37 PM
a little help with my setup rhltechie Equipment/Sanitation 8 08-31-2010 12:56 PM
3 Keggle Setup vs 2 Keggle/Cooler MLT Setup NoisufnoC Equipment/Sanitation 8 01-18-2010 04:54 PM
What was your first setup? Bandit112 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 14 08-11-2007 04:37 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS